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Chemical composition of alfalfa concentrate flour (g/100 g, based on dry weight) 

Chemical composition of alfalfa concentrate flour (g/100 g, based on dry weight) 

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Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is primarily grown for and used in animal feed, but in recent years it started to be used more often for human nutrition, as it is a rich source of easily assimilated proteins, minerals (calcium, phosphorus, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, copper, selenium, organic silicon, manganese), vitamins (C, K, D, E, U, provita...

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... Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the most economical forage legume cultivated globally, and belongs to the leguminous family [1]. It is rich in protein, vitamins, minerals and other important nutrients [2,3]. The rich nutrients contain many potential active ingredients, such as saponins, flavonoids and polysaccharides [3]. ...
... It is rich in protein, vitamins, minerals and other important nutrients [2,3]. The rich nutrients contain many potential active ingredients, such as saponins, flavonoids and polysaccharides [3]. Saponins are natural extracts with unique biological activities and function as antioxidants [4,5]. ...
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Background Oxidative stress could seriously affect the growth performance of piglets. As natural extracts of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa), alfalfa saponins have been shown to function as antioxidants in piglets in vivo. However, few studies have investigated the effects and mechanism of alfalfa saponins against oxidative stress in piglet cells in vitro. In the current study, piglets’ small intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2) was explored to investigate the protective effects of alfalfa saponins on injured cells induced by H2O2. Methods To investigate the effects and mechanism of alfalfa saponins against oxidative stress in piglet cells, the cell viability, activity of antioxidant enzymes, LDH and the amount of MDA were detected in H2O2-treated cells after the cells were pre-incubated with alfalfa saponins. The mechanism of alfalfa saponins against H2O2-induced oxidative cell damage was explored by detecting the expression of mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins. Furthermore, the signaling pathway of alfalfa saponins in IPEC-J2 cells under oxidative stress was also investigated. Results The results indicated that alfalfa saponins could rescue cell viability, elevate the activity of antioxidant enzymes and down-regulate the activity of LDH and the amount of MDA in H2O2-induced cells. Conclusion Alfalfa saponins could inhibit oxidative stress-induced cell mitochondrial apoptosis through the MAPK signaling pathway, thereby providing a new method for improving antioxidant stress ability by means of nutritional regulation.
... In addition, the amino acid composition of alfalfa concentrate obtained after the production of the food additive "Alfalfa Complex" is being studied, where the rich composition of the necessary complex of amino acids, minerals and proteins has been confirmed by classical and spectral methods [1]. ...
... Alfalfa leaf proteins are divided into two types: insoluble green fraction rich in lipids, chlorophyll and carotenoids, white fraction (soluble) contains 65% Ru Bis COribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase [1]. ...
Article
In vitro methods have environmental advantages of preparing bio additives as harmful chemicals such as fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides are used. In addition, obtaining biomass does not depend on seasonality and a long growing season. In this series of experiments, an accelerated method for obtaining a sterile alfalfa culture was developed by adding 1% potassium humate to the explant culture. From 4 varieties of alfalfa, 3 cell lines were selected, characterized by heterogeneity of callus tissues. 1 - line morphogenic structures; 2 - line - without meristematic foci and brown and dark brown in color, which were not further differentiated; 3- line forming polymerogenic tissues. In addition, it was possible to induce denser tissues from loose callus by passaging on the Risting medium in the Ray khan variety. Structured tissues with meristematic foci induced on Risting medium were lyophilized and the dried biomass was prepared for further biochemical analyses. Thus, we have optimized the conditions for obtaining biomass from alfalfa culture and carried out the selection of cell lines, and we assume that callus lines, upon receipt of positive biochemical analyzes, can be used as feed additives.
... Consequently, it is promising to combine dietary fiber with meat products. As the king of forage grass, alfalfa not only has abundant dietary fiber, but also contains many other beneficial ingredients (Apostol et al., 2017;Wang et al., 2018). ...
... With improvement of life standard, there is a growing demand for healthier, more delicious, and highly nutritious food. Alfalfa is rich in fiber and essential amino acids, and contains saponins and flavonoids, as well as a high content of unsaturated fatty acids (Apostol et al., 2017;Wang et al., 2018), which is very consistent with the nutritional requirements of people. Two types of alfalfa ...
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Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is abundant in dietary fiber, alfalfa saponins, and other active ingredients. However, the application of alfalfa is scarce in food. Meatball is one of the most popular meat products in daily life, but eating too many meatballs could result in obesity, hyperlipidemia, and other diseases. With increasing attention to healthy diet, how to keep the original color, aroma, taste, and shape of food with low fat and nutrition has become an urgent problem to be solved. In this study, different amounts of alfalfa meal or extruded alfalfa meal were added to pork meatballs to explore the optimal adding ratio of two kinds of alfalfa meal in pork meatballs. Further animal experiments were conducted for two weeks to prove the efficacy of two kinds of alfalfa balls in lowering blood lipid and body weight. The results showed that 0.5% alfalfa meal and 1% extruded alfalfa meal could improve the quality of prepared pork meatballs. Animal experiments demonstrated that two kinds of alfalfa meal pork meatballs had a good effect of reducing blood lipid, and the alfalfa meal pork meatballs had a better effect on reducing serum cholesterol and average daily weight gain of mice. This study provided a theoretical basis for making healthy and nutritious pork meatballs, which could provide more delicious food for people, especially people who are obese and the elderly. To keep the original color, aroma, taste, and shape of food with low fat and nutrition, alfalfa meal or extruded alfalfa meal was applied to pork meatballs. The research demonstrated that alfalfa meal could improve the quality of prepared pork meatballs and have a good effect on reducing blood lipid and body weight of mice.
... Alfalfa is a common feedstuff included in the diets of many livestock species (Sen et al., 1998), including cattle. Alfalfa provides a source of protein, fiber, and other nutrients (Apostal et al., 2017). Alfalfa leaves have a high protein content and alfalfa stems are high in fiber (Palmonari et al., 2014). ...
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Alfalfa is often included in the diets of beef animals; however, the nutrient content of alfalfa is variable depending on the region in which it is grown, climate, soil, and many other factors. The leaf portion of alfalfa has a less variable nutrient composition than the stem portion of the plant. The variability that is present in the alfalfa plant can make the development of total mixed rations of consistent nutrient content difficult. As such, the purpose of this study was to determine how inclusion of fractionated alfalfa leaves and alfalfa stems impacts performance and carcass quality of finishing beef steers. Twenty-four steers were allocated to one of three treatments: a control group fed a typical finishing diet with alfalfa as the forage (CON; n=8), a typical diet that replaced alfalfa with fractionated alfalfa leaf pellets and alfalfa stems (ProLEAF MAX™ + ProFiber Plus™; PLM+PFP; n=8), or a typical diet that replaced alfalfa with alfalfa stems (PFP; n=8) for 63 days. Steers were fed individually once daily, weighed every 14 days and ultrasound images were collected every 28 days. At the end of the feeding trial, steers were harvested at a commercial facility and carcass data was obtained. Analysis of dry matter intake demonstrated that steers receiving the PFP and CON diets consumed more feed (P < 0.001) than steers consuming the PLM+PFP diet. Steers receiving the PLM+PFP diet gained less (P < 0.001) weight than the steers receiving the other two dietary treatments. No differences (P > 0.10) in feed efficiency or carcass characteristics were observed. Steers receiving the PFP diet had improved (P = 0.016) cost of gain ($0.93 per kg) when compared to steers receiving PLM+PFP ($1.08 per kg) diet. Overall, our findings demonstrate that inclusion of PFP in place of alfalfa hay in a finishing diet has the potential to improve cost of gain, without negatively affecting growth, performance, or carcass characteristics of finishing feedlot steers.
... The variety of fruits and vegetables, methods of their pre-processing, added forms and amounts of addition significantly affect the appearance of the product, taste, structure, nutritional value, storage capacity [2]. In general, plant raw materials that are widely used in food production are mainly carrots [3], tomatoes [4], shiitake mushrooms [5], onions [6], celery, kelp [7], etc. and rare alfalfa [8], very little fruit. Of the fruits, apples, pineapples and plums [9] have a small number of applications. ...
... In a similar study on alfalfa seed, the seed was made into flour. Total protein, total lipid, ash and crude fiber contents in 100 grams of sample were reported as 34.24, 1.39, 11.65, 21.38 grams, respectively [20]. Table 2. Other physical and chemical analyzes. ...
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Edible sprouts are rich in flavonoids and other polyphenols, as well as proteins, minerals, and vitamins. Increasing sprout consumption necessitates improving their quality, palatability, and bioactivity. The purpose of this study was to test how KNO3 priming affects the sprouting process species on three Medicago species (Medicago indicus, Medicago interexta, and Medicago polymorpha) and their nutritional values. Targeted species of Medicago were primed with KNO3, and the levels of different primary and secondary metabolites were determined. KNO3 induced biomass accumulation in the sprouts of the three species, accompanied by an increased content of total mineral nutrients, pigments, vitamins, and essential amino acids. Besides, our results showed that KNO3 enhanced the activity of nitrate reductase (NR), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and glutamine synthetase (GS) enzymes, which are involved in the nitrogen metabolism and GOGAT cycle, which, in turn, increase the nitrogen and protein production. KNO3 treatment improved the bioactive compound activities of Medicago sprouts by increasing total phenolic and flavonoid contents and enhancing the antioxidant and antidiabetic activities. Furthermore, species-specific responses toward KNO3 priming were noticeable, where Medicago interexta showed the highest antioxidant and antidiabetic activities, followed by Medicago polymorpha. Overall, this study sheds the light on the physiological and biochemical bases of growth, metabolism, and tissue quality improvement impact of KNO3 on Medicago sprouts.
Article
Background Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L ) is one of the most planted crops worldwide primarily used to feed animals. The use of alfalfa in human diet as sprouts, infusions and nutritional supplements is rapidly gaining popularity. Despite this, allergenicity assessment of this novel plant food is largely lacking. Results Here, leaf protein extract of alfalfa was studied using a combined proteomics, IgE‐binding inhibition assay and in silico approach to find potential allergens. We have identified and annotated 129 proteins using in‐gel digestion proteomics and Blast2Go suit. A search against COMPARE database, using the identified proteins as query sequences, revealed high similarity with several allergenic proteins. The Single Point Highest Inhibition Achievable assay (SPHIAa) performed on the multiplex FABER® allergy testing system confirmed the in silico results and showed some additional potential allergens. This approach allowed the detection of proteins in alfalfa leaves cross‐reacting with plant allergens from three different allergen families such as lipid transfer, thaumatin‐ like and Bet v 1‐like protein families. In addition, the absence of structural determinants cross‐reacting with seed storage allergenic proteins and with animal allergens was recorded. Conclusion This study reports for the first time potential allergenic proteins in alfalfa. The results suggest that this plant food can be safely introduced, as a protein‐rich supplement, in the diet of patients allergic to animal food allergens. Allergic patients towards certain plant food allergens need to be careful about consuming alfalfa because they might have allergic symptoms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.