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Characteristics of the participants (N=103).

Characteristics of the participants (N=103).

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Article
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This study aimed to evaluate the fear of COVID-19, loneliness, resilience, and quality of life levels in older adults in a nursing home during the pandemic, and the effects of these variables and descriptive characteristics on their quality of life. Data were collected using a participant information form, the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), the Bri...

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Context 1
... duration of stay in the institution for 54.4% of the participants was 1-5 years, only 17.5% of the participants had children, and 90.3% of them stayed in a room with four or more people. Of the almost half (45.6%) the participants who had COVID-19, 79.6% had a history of chronic disease, and 81.6% of the participants had no change in sleep patterns during the pandemic (Table 1). ...
Context 2
... duration of stay in the institution for 54.4% of the participants was 1-5 years, only 17.5% of the participants had children, and 90.3% of them stayed in a room with four or more people. Of the almost half (45.6%) the participants who had COVID-19, 79.6% had a history of chronic disease, and 81.6% of the participants had no change in sleep patterns during the pandemic (Table 1). ...

Citations

... Regarding age, the research highlights that older people suffered the most from negative effects such as fear and loneliness 19,20 . Younger individuals had fewer negative emotions because they saw COVID-19 as a less risky disease for them 21 , although they did report anxiety and depression due to the social restrictions imposed 21 . ...
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The outbreak of COVID-19 forced a dramatic shift in education, from in-person learning to an increased use of distance learning over the past 2 years. Opinions and sentiments regarding this switch from traditional to remote classes can be tracked in real time in microblog messages promptly shared by Twitter users, who constitute a large and ever-increasing number of individuals today. Given this framework, the present study aims to investigate sentiments and topics related to distance learning in Italy from March 2020 to November 2021. A two-step sentiment analysis was performed using the VADER model and the syuzhet package to understand the overall sentiments and emotions. A dynamic latent Dirichlet allocation model (DLDA) was built to identify commonly discussed topics in tweets and their evolution over time. The results show a modest majority of negative opinions, which shifted over time until the trend reversed. Among the eight emotions of the syuzhet package, ‘trust’ was the most positive emotion observed in the tweets, while ‘fear’ and ‘sadness’ were the top negative emotions. Our analysis also identified three topics: (1) requests for support measures for distance learning, (2) concerns about distance learning and its application, and (3) anxiety about the government decrees introducing the red zones and the corresponding restrictions. People’s attitudes changed over time. The concerns about distance learning and its future applications (topic 2) gained importance in the latter stages of 2021, while the first and third topics, which were ranked highly at first, started a steep descent in the last part of the period. The results indicate that even if current distance learning ends, the Italian people are concerned that any new emergency will bring distance learning back into use again.
... Older people suffer most from the negative effects of COVID-19. Restrictive measures, fear, and loneliness have had negative repercussions on the resilience of people aged 65 and over, thus compromising their physical and psychological wellbeing (Plagg et al., 2020;Set, 2020;Savci et al., 2021). Esposito et al. (2021) underline how young participants due to the social restrictions imposed suffered of anxiety and depression; furthermore, Biviá-Roig et al. (2020) found that pregnant women during lockdowns suffered most from anxiety and depression. ...
Article
Full-text available
The pandemic nature of COVID-19 has caused major changes in health, economy, and society globally. Albeit to a lesser extent, contingent access to shops and places to socialize the imposition of social distancing and the use of indoor masks is measures still in force today (more than a year after the start of the pandemic), with repercussions on economic, social, and psychological levels. The fear of contagion, in fact, has led us to be increasingly suspicious and to isolate ourselves from the remainder of the community. This has had repercussions on the perception of loneliness, with significant psychological consequences, such as the development of stress, anxiety, and, in extreme cases, depressive symptoms. Starting from these assumptions, this research was developed with the aim of deepening the perceptions that the participants have of their own mental health, loneliness, fear linked to contagion, and attitudes toward imposed social distancing. In particular, we wanted to analyze whether there is a relationship between perceived fear and the perceived level of mental health, loneliness, and attitude toward social distancing. Finally, we wanted to analyze whether there are differences related to gender, age, marital status, current working mode, and educational qualifications. The research, performed after the diffusion of the vaccination in Italy, lasted 14 days. The participants were 500 Italians who voluntarily joined the study and were recruited with random cascade sampling. The research followed a quantitative approach. The analyzed data, from participants residing throughout the national territory, allow us to return the picture of the perceptions that Italians have of the fear of contagion, of their level of mental health, of loneliness and of their attitude toward social distancing. In particular, the data show that fear of COVID-19 is an emotional state experienced by the entire population and that young people have suffered more from loneliness and have been less inclined to accept the imposed social distancing. The data that emerged should make policymakers reflect on the need to find functional strategies to combat COVID-19 or other health emergency crises whose effects do not affect the psychological wellbeing of the population.
... According to the data of Ministry of Health, older adults constitute 11% of the reported patients and 72% of deaths. 9 After the first case was seen in Turkey on March 11, 2020, various measures were taken across the country for all people, but especially for older adults. A partial curfew was introduced for older adults and those with chronic diseases. ...
... There are previous studies conducted before the pandemic regarding health literacy level of older adults, [23][24][25] and several studies related to fear of COVID-19 during the pandemic. 9,13,29,30 However, a gap exists in the literature regarding whether there is a relationship between fear of COVID-19 and health literacy levels in older adults during the pandemic. It is thought that determining the fear of COVID-19, health literacy levels, and the associated factors in older adults could lead to an increase in the awareness of older adults about the prevention and control of the disease, and guide healthcare professionals in their education of older adults. ...
Article
This study aimed to examine the fear of coronavirus and the health literacy levels of older adults during the pandemic. The sample consisted of 304 older adults from five family health centers in Turkey between April and May 2021. The data were collected using the Fear of COVID-19 Scale and the Health Literacy Scale. The fear of COVID-19 was found to be higher in women, those with chronic diseases, and those who found the epidemic measures insufficient (p < 0.05). The health literacy level was found to be higher in those with high education level, those in the 65-74 age group, and those with not using regular medicine (p < 0.001). The health literacy of older adults was a slightly above moderate level and the fear of COVID-19 was at a moderate level. Health literacy levels of older adults may be increased with written, visual, and verbal health trainings.