Citations

... Legumes have also been manipulated for the development of new media (Ravimannan et al., 2014;Uthayasooriyan et al., 2016;Shareef, 2019;Mohammed et al., 2020). Legumes are food crops belonging to the Leguminosae family. ...
... In previous studies using soybean and soy-based products for media preparation, most researchers considered several parameters in media preparation, especially pH, which may affect microbial growth in the media Uthayasooriyan et al., 2016;Shareef, 2019). Nevertheless, in the present study, we disregarded the influence of pH on microbial growth to significantly reduce the risk of contamination. ...
... Soybeans contain nine essential amino acids such as valine, tryptophan, threonine, phenylalanine, methionine, lysine, leucine, isoleucine, and histidine (Monte Singer et al., 2020). Previous studies have shown that soy-based products can serve as good sources of nutrients for the cultivation of various microorganisms, especially bacteria and fungi Uthayasooriyan et al., 2016;Shareef, 2019;Cruz et al., 2020). Similar results were obtained in this study, where B. subtilis grew very well in both media, SBA and NA. ...
Article
Nutrient agar is a commonly used medium for the isolation and growth of a broad range of microorganisms. The feasibility of using soybean as a base medium in the development of alternative growth media was assessed in this study. Nutrient agar was used as a standard guide to evaluating the performance of the formulated soybean agar. Bacillus subtilis was inoculated and allowed to grow on nutrient agar and soybean agar. Their growth was compared within 24 h after inoculation based on the morphology of individual colonies formed on both media and the pattern of bacterial growth. Our results showed that soybean agar had comparable performance to nutrient agar as the morphological characteristics of B. subtilis colonies formed on both media are generally identical in terms of texture, margin, optical properties, colour, elevation, and shape. However, due to the similar appearance of the bacterial colonies and the soybean agar, the colonies formed on the soybean agar were slightly larger than those formed on nutrient agar. In addition, our findings also revealed that agar strips formed the best soybean agar compared to gelatin and agar powder. Ultimately, this study has shown that locally available soybeans and agar strips can be easily formulated as an alternative to commercial nutrient agar and have great potential for bacteriological research.
... Sources of carbohydrates can be from tubers such as arrowroot, gayong, gembili, sweet potato and taro, cassava [1,4,6]. Types of nuts, according to Garraway and Evans (1984), the medium must contain protein for apical hyphal spore formation [7,8]. ...
... This showed that the nutrients contained in the mung bean and rice medium were able to support the growth of the fungus. According to Shareef (2019), the composition of the culture medium was an important factor for the growth of microorganisms [7]. Endophytic fungi isolate E1 showed the same growth rate of isolates in the three types of alternative medium (mung bean, corn, and rice) and control (PDA). ...
... This showed that the nutrients contained in the mung bean and rice medium were able to support the growth of the fungus. According to Shareef (2019), the composition of the culture medium was an important factor for the growth of microorganisms [7]. Endophytic fungi isolate E1 showed the same growth rate of isolates in the three types of alternative medium (mung bean, corn, and rice) and control (PDA). ...
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Article
Medium for the growth of endophytic fungi generally uses Potato Dextrose Agar media, but because the price is expensive, it is necessary to find materials for alternative media from organic materials that are easy to obtain and inexpensive. The legume group was one of the alternative ingredients as the source of protein, corn, and rice as the source of carbohydrates for the growth medium. This study aimed to determine the potential of organic matter such as rice, corn, and legumes as a medium for the growth of endophytic fungi. The research methods included: rejuvenation of endophytic fungus isolation, preparation of organic medium from rice, corn, legumes, and potatoes, growth test of endophytic fungus on 4 types of organic media.
... It is also predicted that a large number of bacteria species in the environment also cannot be cultured due to the lack of appropriate media which are needed for their growth [6]. This is the main driving force behind the constant effort for the formulation and development of newer media for culture of bacteria [8][9][10]. Such new Open Access BMC Research Notes *Correspondence: ashfaque@rakmhsu.ac.ae media will allow scientists to grow and study currently un-culturable bacterial species. ...
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Article
Objective: Although many bacterial culture media are available commercially, there is a continuous effort to develop better selective media for bacteria, which cannot be grown on existing media. While exploring antibacterial properties of clove, we observed that it has the potential to selectively inhibit growth of certain types of bacteria. This led us to do the experiments, which resulted in developing a new media which selectively allowed the growth of only Gram-negative bacteria, while inhibiting the Gram-positive bacteria. Results: Mueller Hinton Agar (MHA) was used as the base media and was modified to develop MHA-C15 (MHA containing 15% volume/volume water extract of clove). Gram-negative bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa grew on MHA-C15. However, none of the major Gram-positive bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus mutans, Bacillus spp. and Enterococcus spp. grew on it. Taken together, these findings show that MHA-C15 is a newly developed selective media for culture of Gram-negative bacteria.
... The author reports that, with the exception of the rice-based medium, all other media proved effective in growing the tested microorganisms, which included bacteria and fungi commonly associated with food spoilage or diseases (Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, B. cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Penicillium sp., and Aspergillus sp.). Given the satisfactory results, the author stated that these alternative media could easily replace conventional culture media (Shareef, 2019). In the Philippines, Gabunia et al. (2019) evaluated corn extract as an alternative growth medium for S. aureus and E. coli. ...
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Article
Conventional culture media are expensive owing to their constituents. Thus, several studies have sought to develop and evaluate the efficacy of alternative, low-cost culture media, in most cases, using natural and easily accessible raw materials. The present study is a literature review, observing various formulations of culture media based on products of plant origin for the growth of microorganisms and production of microbial compounds of industrial interest. In most formulations, vegetable substrates, such as soy, certain beans, corn, and rice, were used in addition to hortofruticultural products. Compared to conventional media, the alternative culture media often present satisfactory results in terms of microbial growth efficiency and production cost.
... It is also predicted that a large number of bacteria species in the environment also cannot be cultured due to the lack of appropriate media which are needed for their growth [6]. This is the main driving force behind the constant effort for the formulation and development of newer media for bacterial culture [8][9][10]. Such new media will allow scientists to grow and study currently un-culturable bacterial species ...
Full-text available
Preprint
Objective: Although many bacterial culture media are commercially available, there is a continuous effort to develop better selective media for bacteria, which cannot be grown on existing media. While exploring antibacterial properties of clove, we observed that it has the potential to selectively inhibit growth of certain types of bacteria. This led us to do the experiments which resulted in developing the media which selectively allowed the growth of only Gram-negative bacteria, while inhibiting the Gram-positive bacteria. Results: Mueller Hinton Agar (MHA) was used as the base media and was modified to develop MHA-C15 (MHA containing 15 % volume / volume water extract of clove). Different Gram-negative bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa grew on MHA-C15. However, none of the major Gram-positive bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus mutans, Bacillus spp. and Enterococcus spp. grew on it. Taken together, these findings show that MHA-C15 is a newly developed selective media for culture of Gram-negative bacteria.
Article
This study aims to reuse food waste (FW) as growth media for bacterial cultures for bioremediation of heavy metal. The best natural medium was selected based on the carbon, nitrogen, and other elements. The batch culture of Comamonas terrae showed growth stability for 16 days in the pig bone medium. C. terrae showed the best growth at pH of 7.4, temperature of 35°C, and medium concentration of 10 g/L. The C. terrae showed heavy metal (HM) removal efficiencies of Cd (52%) Cr (63%) Pb (62%) and Zn (55%). In addition, the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results revealed the bioadsorption of HM in C. terrae. The study suggests the C. terrae can efficiently remove HM and C. terrae may be used for bioremediation of HM. Therefore, pig bone waste is a cost-effective medium and a good solution for the valorization and reuse of FW in line with the circular economy.