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Category formation according to Tverski and Gati 1978 (illustration from van der Leeuw 2020a).

Category formation according to Tverski and Gati 1978 (illustration from van der Leeuw 2020a).

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In this paper we conceptualize transformations as societal shifts from one basin of attraction to another. Such shifts occur when a society's information processing system is no longer fit to deal with the dynamics with which the society is involved. To understand when this might be the case, we conceive of a dynamic interaction between two domains...

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... discuss the dynamics of categorization we will use a simplified model of categorization in relation to decision making under uncertainty (Tversky 1977, Tversky and Gati 1978, Kahnemann et al. 1982; Fig. 2). [2] Categorization combines a number of phenomena into a category that is distinguishable by adopting one or more of their characteristics as a label. That process requires pattern recognition, a comparison between similarities and dissimilarities among the phenomena observed. In the first phase of that process, the category is the ...
Context 2
... discuss the dynamics of categorization we will use a simplified model of categorization in relation to decision making under uncertainty (Tversky 1977, Tversky and Gati 1978, Kahnemann et al. 1982; Fig. 2). [2] Categorization combines a number of phenomena into a category that is distinguishable by adopting one or more of their characteristics as a label. That process requires pattern recognition, a comparison between similarities and dissimilarities among the phenomena observed. In the first phase of that process, the category is the ...

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