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Case 1 - Overall Targeted Reduction(MAX). 

Case 1 - Overall Targeted Reduction(MAX). 

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Conference Paper
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Regulating the power consumption to avoid peaks in demand is a known method. Demand Response is used as tool by utility providers to minimize costs and avoid network overload during peaks in demand. Although it has been used extensively there is a shortage of solutions dealing with real-time scheduling of DR events. Past attempts focus on minimizin...

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... we are less restricted than in the case of AVG. So it was expected to get results in between MAX and AVG.In (Fig.2)we chose to present the results produced by the MAX estimate. ...

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Citations

... The first is to forgo accuracy guarantees in favor of performance. Techniques such as [39,27,50,40] develop fast algorithms that can have arbitrarily large errors in the objective function (utility maximization, cost minimization, etc.). Authors in [39] develop a genetic-algorithm-based heuristic, while [50] presents a heuristic based on change making. ...
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