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Cars per household, by country

Cars per household, by country

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Technical Report
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In this study, the results of a new survey on attitudes and preferences towards electric vehicles are reported. In addition, these results are compared with those of a similar survey conducted in 2012, so that the evolution of preferences towards electric cars by European drivers can be mapped.

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... Figure 4 displays national statistics for car ownership and household characteristics. Inspection of the sample data and available national statistics, statistical tests and a sense check across the selection of countries suggests, on the basis of the indicator 'cars per household', that the samples drawn from the national panels are typical of conditions applying to each of the MS surveyed. ...

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