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Cannabidiol induces activation of the caspase cascade, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and release of cytochrome c. A, Jurkat tumor cells were exposed to various concentrations of CBD (2.5 or 5.0 M) or the vehicle or for 24 h, In addition, the role of CB2 in the CBD-induced changes in caspase activity was monitored by culturing Jurkat cells with CBD (2.5 or 5.0 M) as well as the CB2-selective antagonist, SR144528. Next, the cells were lysed, the cellular proteins were isolated, and Western analysis was performed. The levels of the procaspases as well as the presence of the cleaved form (CF) of various caspases were examined. B, Jurkat tumor cells were exposed to various concentrations of CBD (2.5 and 5.0 M) or the vehicle for 24 h. Fifteen minutes before the end of the incubations, DiOC 6 was added for a final concentration of 40 nM. The cells were harvested and analyzed by flow cytometry. The percentage of cells with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential is depicted. C, the effect of CBD exposure on the level of cytosolic cytochrome c in Jurkat cells was determined by culturing the cells with CBD (2.5 and 5.0 M) CB2-selective antagonist SR144528 (5.0 M) for 24 h. The cells were harvested and washed, and cytosolic proteins were analyzed for cytochrome c by Western blot analysis. 

Cannabidiol induces activation of the caspase cascade, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and release of cytochrome c. A, Jurkat tumor cells were exposed to various concentrations of CBD (2.5 or 5.0 M) or the vehicle or for 24 h, In addition, the role of CB2 in the CBD-induced changes in caspase activity was monitored by culturing Jurkat cells with CBD (2.5 or 5.0 M) as well as the CB2-selective antagonist, SR144528. Next, the cells were lysed, the cellular proteins were isolated, and Western analysis was performed. The levels of the procaspases as well as the presence of the cleaved form (CF) of various caspases were examined. B, Jurkat tumor cells were exposed to various concentrations of CBD (2.5 and 5.0 M) or the vehicle for 24 h. Fifteen minutes before the end of the incubations, DiOC 6 was added for a final concentration of 40 nM. The cells were harvested and analyzed by flow cytometry. The percentage of cells with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential is depicted. C, the effect of CBD exposure on the level of cytosolic cytochrome c in Jurkat cells was determined by culturing the cells with CBD (2.5 and 5.0 M) CB2-selective antagonist SR144528 (5.0 M) for 24 h. The cells were harvested and washed, and cytosolic proteins were analyzed for cytochrome c by Western blot analysis. 

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In the current study, we examined the effects of the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol, on the induction of apoptosis in leukemia cells. Exposure of leukemia cells to cannabidiol led to cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2)-mediated reduction in cell viability and induction in apoptosis. Furthermore, cannabidiol treatment led to a significant decreas...

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... the mechanism of cannabidiol- induced apoptosis, we examined the activation pattern of caspases after CBD exposure. To this end, Jurkat cells were exposed to various concentrations of cannabidiol (2.5 and 5 M) or the vehicle for 24 h. Next, the cells were harvested and the presence of the various caspases was determined by Western blot analysis (Fig. 5A). The results demonstrate that exposure to CBD at concentrations of 2.5 M or greater led to activation of the caspase cascade. More specifically, we ob- served cleavage of caspase-8, and reduction in procaspase-2, -9, and -10, which are thought to be involved in initiating the caspase cascade. In addition, the cleavage of the effector ...
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... investigated by examining the effect of CBD on Jur- kat mitochondrial membrane potential as well as the levels of cytosolic cytochrome c. Exposure of Jurkat cells to 2.5 M or greater CBD for 24 h led to a significant reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Fig. 5B). Furthermore, 2.5 M or greater CBD led to a significant increase in the level of cytosolic cytochrome c (Fig. 5C). Together, these results suggest a direct role of the mitochondria in CBD- induced ...
Context 3
... of CBD on Jur- kat mitochondrial membrane potential as well as the levels of cytosolic cytochrome c. Exposure of Jurkat cells to 2.5 M or greater CBD for 24 h led to a significant reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Fig. 5B). Furthermore, 2.5 M or greater CBD led to a significant increase in the level of cytosolic cytochrome c (Fig. 5C). Together, these results suggest a direct role of the mitochondria in CBD- induced ...

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