Figures
Explore figures and images from publications
Figure - uploaded by Amira El-Shal
Content may be subject to copyright.
Calculated long-run impact of health disasters on MMR, U5MR, and NMR in LMICs from a dynamic model specification

Calculated long-run impact of health disasters on MMR, U5MR, and NMR in LMICs from a dynamic model specification

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
In times of epidemics and pandemics, depletion or diversion of health system resources from routine health care is common, posing serious threats to primary care. This paper estimates the contemporaneous and long-run effects of health disasters on maternal and child mortality in 111 countries during 2000-2019 using two-way fixed-effects and two-ste...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... dummies are included (but not reported) in all specifications to control for period fixed effects. In Table 4, we report the estimated long-run effects of changes in our explanatory variables of interest on MMR, U5MR, and NMR, indicating how each parameter is calculated. ...
Context 2
... we estimate that occurrence of health disasters increases MMR, U5MR, and NMR, respectively, by about 0.3%, 0.3%, and 0.2% immediately in LMICs (Table 3). While these effects are significant, the magnitude of the long-run effects is much larger, and about 35%, 80%, and 26%, respectively, after a year ( Table 4). The lagged values of the disaster dummy are highly significant for all three mortality ratios (Table 3), confirming an appropriate long-term dynamic specification (Table 4). ...
Context 3
... these effects are significant, the magnitude of the long-run effects is much larger, and about 35%, 80%, and 26%, respectively, after a year ( Table 4). The lagged values of the disaster dummy are highly significant for all three mortality ratios (Table 3), confirming an appropriate long-term dynamic specification (Table 4). As anticipated, both GDP per capita and physician density have significant short and long-run effects on maternal and child mortality in LMICs (Tables 3 and 4). ...
Context 4
... dummies are included (but not reported) in all specifications to control for period fixed effects. In Table 4, we report the estimated long-run effects of changes in our explanatory variables of interest on MMR, U5MR, and NMR, indicating how each parameter is calculated. ...
Context 5
... we estimate that occurrence of health disasters increases MMR, U5MR, and NMR, respectively, by about 0.3%, 0.3%, and 0.2% immediately in LMICs (Table 3). While these effects are significant, the magnitude of the long-run effects is much larger, and about 35%, 80%, and 26%, respectively, after a year ( Table 4). The lagged values of the disaster dummy are highly significant for all three mortality ratios (Table 3), confirming an appropriate long-term dynamic specification (Table 4). ...
Context 6
... these effects are significant, the magnitude of the long-run effects is much larger, and about 35%, 80%, and 26%, respectively, after a year ( Table 4). The lagged values of the disaster dummy are highly significant for all three mortality ratios (Table 3), confirming an appropriate long-term dynamic specification (Table 4). As anticipated, both GDP per capita and physician density have significant short and long-run effects on maternal and child mortality in LMICs (Tables 3 and 4). ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
In times of epidemics and pandemics, depletion or diversion of health system resources from routine health care is common, posing serious threats to primary care. This paper estimates the contemporaneous and long-run effects of health disasters on maternal and child mortality in 111 countries during 2000-2019 using two-way fixed-effects and two-ste...

Citations

... Because universal health coverage entails a significant cost, estimating the effects of user fee imposition is crucial, especially in settings where resources are constrained. The depletion or diversion of health system resources brought about by successive epidemics and pandemics together with the negative impact of such events on maternal and child health, reinforce the relevance of this study (El-Shal et al., 2021b). The persistently high burden of out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditure on health in Egypt further motivates this study. ...
Article
The effect of introducing or increasing user fees for health services in low- and middle-income countries is controversial. While user fees are advocated as an effective means of generating revenue and enabling health service quality improvement, they constitute a financial barrier to access health services for the poorer. This paper contributes to the literature on the demand-side financing in health by providing evidence on the medium-term effects of introducing user fees on the utilisation of family planning, antenatal and delivery care services, women’s access to health care, and child health status in a middle-income country setting. Using a difference-in-differences identification approach to establish causality, we find that the introduction of user fees in Egypt had no negative effect on the utilisation of family planning and delivery care services. Further, fees did not hinder women’s access to care and did not harm child health outcomes. Positive effects were even observed with respect to the utilisation of antenatal care services. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that the potential decrease in demand due to the user fee imposition might have been offset by an increased willingness to pay for a health care quality that could be, at least partly, perceived as higher.