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CONSORT diagram of participant flow in this study.

CONSORT diagram of participant flow in this study.

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Objectives: To assess the effects of P6 and LI4 acupressure on post-caesarean pain and analgesic consumption. Design: This was a randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study conducted in a university-affiliated obstetrics clinic between July 2017 and July 2018. Participants: Women (n=132) were randomly assigned to acupressure (n=44), p...

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... women were blinded to the applied intervention type. However, the first author, who was responsible for data collection, was not blinded to the application (Figure 1). ...

Citations

... Some studies have shown that a period of the physiotherapy program and massage therapy in the early stage of the post-cesarean section has a positive effect on pain reduction and analgesic consumption (19)(20)(21). A recent study also reported a relationship between physical activity and pain-related disability reduction in women with normal delivery (22). ...
... Studies examining the effect of physical stimuli on postoperative pain intensity found low pain perception in the experimental groups compared to the control group (P <0.05) and needed fewer medications to control pain (p≤0.05) (11,(19)(20)(21). ...
Article
Background & Objective: The cesarean section increases worldwide and has many side effects, including acute pain. This study investigated the relationship between physical activity during pregnancy, analgesic consumption, and maximal postoperative pain in women with low segment cesarean section. Materials & Methods: 340 Cesarean section women were interviewed by demographic and global physical activity questionnaires during the pre-operative visits. The participants were categorized into high, moderate, and low physical activity groups (high PA, moderate PA, low PA, respectively) according to the global physical activity questionnaire guidelines. The maximal postoperative pain (MPP), the type, and doses of analgesia used/2 days were recorded. Pearson correlation, Chi-square, and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: MPP was reduced in the high PA group (5.48 ±1.72) compared to the moderate (6.46±1.30) and low PA groups (6.97±1.92; p<0.0005, p<0.0005, respectively). There was a difference between the moderate and low PA groups (p=0.04). Paracetamol was the common analgesic without significant difference among groups (p=0.37). The numbers of paracetamol doses significantly reduced in the high PA group (3.31±1.65) compared to the low PA group (4.03±2.01, p=0.01). MPP had a significant and low negative correlation with total physical activity (r=-0.25, p=0.0005). There was a negative significant correlation between occupation (r=-0.491, p=0.0005), recreational (r=-0.262, p=0.0005), and travel activities (r=--0.150, p=0.006) with MPP. There was a low positive correlation between sedentary activity and MPP (r=0.23, p=0.0005). Conclusions: Maternal physical activity can be a non-pharmacological and cost-effective method of pain management.
... Spirometry is required to improve pulmonary function in gas exchange and oxygenation however, most patients are not able to breathe deeply because of pain at the site of chest surgery. Various studies have been performed on the effectiveness of Hugo point acupressure to reduce pain [15][16][17]. Due to the lack of a study of the effect of Hugo pressure on the chest tube pain, we conducted a study to determine the effect of Hugo massage on the respiratory volume and the pain intensity in patients with the chest tube. ...
... Regarding the positive effect of Hugo point acupressure massage on reducing the pain intensity in patients in the chest tube at the expiratory stage, no similar study has been performed so far, however, in line with the positive effect of Hugo point acupressure massage on reducing pain in various diseases in line with the results of the study of Akgün et al. (2020), the acupressure group (P6 and LI4) had the lowest post-cesarean pain compared to the placebo group and the control group [18]. Also, in many studies, Hugo point massage has had a significant effect on reducing natural childbirth and post-cesarean pain [17,[21][22][23]. ...
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Introduction Hugo point is the most important pain control point in the body, so the study was performed to determine the effect of Hugo point massage on respiratory volume and the pain intensity after chest tube placement. Materials and methods The study was performed as a randomized crossover clinical trial on 61 patients with a chest tube. Patients were placed in every two hours through the ternary permutation block once under a false point pressure, once under a Hugo point pressure, and once without intervention. Data were collected using a questionnaire of demographic, clinical information, the Numerical Pain Rating Scale, and spirometry. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to analyze the data. Findings There was no significant difference in the pain intensity before and during the intervention between the three groups. However, after the intervention, the mean pain intensity in the control group was higher than the Hugo and placebo groups (P < 0.001), and the mean pain intensity in the placebo group was higher than in the Hugo group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the three groups in terms of the rate of ascent and retention time of spirometry ball the three times before, during, and after the intervention. Conclusion Hugo point massage reduces the pain intensity; however, has no significant effect on their respiratory volume. Hugo point massage is recommended to reduce the severity of pain in patients with chest tube.