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©Clint Zeagler-Movement Sensor Placement Body Map [64]. 

©Clint Zeagler-Movement Sensor Placement Body Map [64]. 

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Conference Paper
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One of the first questions a researcher or designer of wearable technology has to answer in the design process is where on the body the device should be worn. It has been almost 20 years since Gemperle et al. wrote "Design for Wearability" [17], and although much of her initial guidelines on humans factors surrounding wearability still stand, devic...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... choices in on-body location come down to a balance between the desired use of the wearable device and the affordances different parts of the body offer. Each consideration listed has a corresponding body map (see figure 1 as an example) created from synthesizing the affordances found in literature. The full collection of body maps can be downloaded for use [64]. ...
Context 2
... general public's interest in fitness tracking by means of body movement and step counting launched companies like Fitbit into household names. While complex algorithms have made it possible to capture some body movement information without respect to the location of the sensor on the body, more precise readings can come from planning on-body sensor location, placement, and attachment (see figure 1). ...
Context 3
... consideration listed has a corresponding body map (see figure 1 as an example) created from synthesizing the affordances found in literature. The full collection of body maps with references and design considerations can be downloaded for use [64]. ...

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