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Breakdown of Face-to-Face Participants (n=34)

Breakdown of Face-to-Face Participants (n=34)

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Article
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Information Systems (IS) research is often conducted under the assumption that technology use leads to positive outcomes for different stakeholders. However, many IS studies demonstrate limited evidence of having engaged with the stakeholders that they claim benefit and speak on behalf of. It is therefore not surprising that examples abound of wher...

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... recruited policymakers included Members of the European Parliament, Senators, and an advisor to the government from the Office of Science, Technology and Innovation. In total, 48 people were recruited across all target groups and in the end, 34 stakeholders attended the consultation (See Figure 2). Appendix B outlines the breakdown of participants groups in more detail. ...

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... The identification of relevant real-world problems requires the involvement of those affected already in the initial problem identification phase [14]. In order to engage with different stakeholders we invited citizens and collected problems and challenges using the digital citizen science application MyResearchChallenge [8]. ...
Conference Paper
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Design-oriented research typically involves some kind of research problem discovery activity in order to identify and understand the problem space. Researchers can apply different methods to explore the problem space, for instance, interviews or focus groups. However, these methods are time consuming and do not scale well. Especially when it comes to discovering socially relevant real-world problems they require access to the general public to reach domain experts that is often difficult to achieve for researchers. Citizen science offers a promising approach for research problem discovery by actively involving citizens into the scientific inquiry to access knowledge on a large scale. In this paper, we report on a participatory action following a digital citizen science approach by specifically exploring the topic "home office" and corresponding challenges along four different subtopics. We report on (1) our approach and process to involve citizens in the problem discovery phase, (2) the implementation of the process in the web-based digital citizen science application MyResearchChallenge to enable citizens to register, collect, discuss, and vote challenges, and (3) provide a summary on the collected challenges.
... To address this gap in research, we adhere to design science research by following the methodology formulated by Peffers et al. (2007) and seek to design actionable guidance for sourcing and managing external data by using a rigorous research process. McCarthy et al. (2020) argue that the successful identification of relevant real-world problems in DSR relies on the engagement of stakeholders (i.e., practitioners) in all phases, starting with the initial problem identification phase. Our multi-year research project debuted in February 2020, when we formed an expert group with practitioners from nine high-profile companies to investigate the challenges related to external data sourcing and management. ...
Conference Paper
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External data has become an indispensable pillar in state-of-the-art decision-making and value creation in an enterprise context. Despite the increasing motivation to use external data, information systems (IS) research still lacks an adequate data sourcing perspective. This study aims to address this gap by investigating the practical challenges in this emerging field and developing a reference process for sourcing and managing external data. To this end, we adopt a design science research approach leveraging collaboration with practitioners from nine high-profile companies. Our findings contribute to the scarce body of knowledge on data sourcing in IS by proposing explicit prescriptions in the form of a reference process for sourcing and managing external data.
... Following our goal of designing a digitization pipeline for documents that contain both printed text and symbols/objects, we define design requirements (DR) for a corresponding prototype ( Fig. 1 -Step 2). Here, as argued by [27], it is crucial for the success of the DSR project to involve those affected by the practical problem that was characterized in the initial problem statement ( Fig. 1 -Step 1). To do so, we first interviewed employees of a practitioner to get practical requirements from the end-users firsthand. ...
Chapter
Although digitization is advancing rapidly, a large amount of data processed by companies is in printed format. Technologies such as Optical Character Recognition (OCR) support the transformation of printed text into machine-readable content. However, OCR struggles when data on documents is highly unstructured and includes non-text objects. This, e.g., applies to documents such as medical prescriptions. Leveraging Design Science Research (DSR), we propose a flexible processing pipeline that can deal with character recognition on the one hand and object detection on the other hand. To do so, we derive Design Requirements (DR) in cooperation with a practitioner doing prescription billing in the healthcare domain. We then developed a prototype blueprint that is applicable to similar problem formulations. Overall, we contribute to research and practice in multiple ways. First, we provide evidence for selected OCR methods provided by previous research. Second, we design a machine-learning-based digitization pipeline for printed documents containing both text and non-text objects in the context of medical prescriptions. Third, we derive a nascent design pattern for this type of document digitization. These patterns are the foundation for further research and can support the development of innovative information systems leading to more efficient decision making and thus to economic resource usage.KeywordsDocument image analysisOptical character recognitionDigitizationMachine learningPreprocessingPostprocessing
... Design Science Research (DSR) targets to solve real-world problems in business and society. From a societal perspective, engaging with citizens to understand problems and provide solutions is critical and constitutes a prerequisite for responsible research and innovation in IS and beyond [1,2]. Citizen Science, "the (large-scale) involvement of citizens in scientific endeavors not only as participants but as co-researchers" [3 p. 273] is a prominent approach to foster extensive public participation in research projects with the aim to close the gap between scientific and public perspectives on real-world problems [3]. ...
... Identifying and formulating problems that matter requires substantial engagement with the stakeholders [9]. However, scholars rarely involve those affected by their research [1,10]. Approaches to leverage creativity, wisdom, and experience of the society for identifying relevant research problems are still scarce. ...
... Based on the existing DSR, Citizen Science, and crowdsourcing literature introduced above, we derive an initial set of design requirements (DR) for our participatory problem discovery system following a CDSR paradigm. As argued by [1] and [2] the identification of relevant real-world problems requires the involvement of those affected already in the initial problem identification phase which is crucial for the success of a DSR project [7]. We thus articulate the first and second design requirements as follows: DR1: The system should enable the cooperation between researchers and citizens to jointly explore the problem space of a DSR project. ...
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To solve societal problems, it is essential to engage with actual problem owners in society in a scalable way. In this paper, we follow a Citizen Design Science Research (CDSR) paradigm proposing to more actively involve society in DSR projects. Specifically, we present MyResearchChallenge.digital, a prototypical system that supports participatory problem discovery by enabling the involvement of citizens in problem awareness in a scalable way. The system allows researchers and citizens to cooperate on the exploration of a given problem space, leveraging the creativity and wisdom of the crowd for identifying and describing relevant DSR problems. The evaluation of the prototype with 30 representative citizens points to the system’s strengths and opportunities related to its ease of use and the problem articulation feature but also reveals weaknesses and threats concerning the problem exploration features and issues about platform abuse.
Article
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Social media platforms are a pervasive technology that continue to define our modern world. While social media has no doubt brought many benefits to society in terms of connection and content sharing, numerous concerns remain for the governance of social media platforms going forward; including (but not limited to) the spread of misinformation, hate speech, and online surveillance. However, the voice of citizens and other non-experts is often missing from such conversations in information systems literature which has led to an alleged gap between research and the everyday life of citizens. Our qualitative study presents findings from 16 hours of online dialogue with 25 citizens on the dark sides of digitalisation and social media platform governance. The online dialogue was undertaken as part of a worldwide consultation project called “We, the Internet” which sought to provide citizens with a voice on a range of topics such as “Digitalisation and Me”, “My Data, Your Data, Our Data”, and “A Strong Digital Public Sphere”. Five phases of thematic analysis were undertaken by the authors to code the corpus of qualitative data. Building on the Theory of Communicative Action, we discuss three dialogical processes critical to citizen discourse: lifeworld reasoning, rationalisation, and moral action. Our findings point towards citizens’ perspectives of current and future issues associated with social media platform governance, including concerns around the multiplicity of digital identities, consent for vulnerable groups, and transparency in content moderation. We also reveal citizen’s rationalisation of the dilemmas faced in addressing these issues going forward including tensions such as digital accountability vs. data privacy, protection vs. inclusion, and algorithmic censorship vs. free speech. Based on outcomes from this dialogical process, moral actions in the form of policy recommendations are proposed by citizens, and for citizens. We find that tackling these dark sides of digitalisation is something too important to be left to ‘Big Tech’ and equally requires an understanding of citizens’ perspectives to ensure an informed and positive imprint for change.