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Boxplots for the climatic variables air temperature (°C) and vapour pressure (hPa) by season (spring and autumn are averaged; winter = purple, spring/autumn = orange, summer = green) and location. Minimum temp is the mean minimum air temperature, mean temp is mean air temperature, maximum temp is the mean maximum air temperature and vapour pressure is the mean vapour pressure. The indoor climate is from our study homes and outdoor climate values are from the 100 grid cells that are the most climatically similar to the mean home indoor climate. The box plots display data range, quartiles and median with dots as outliers. Figure was generated with R (version 3.3.2; http://www.R-project.org) package ggplot2 (version 2.2.0; http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=ggplot2).

Boxplots for the climatic variables air temperature (°C) and vapour pressure (hPa) by season (spring and autumn are averaged; winter = purple, spring/autumn = orange, summer = green) and location. Minimum temp is the mean minimum air temperature, mean temp is mean air temperature, maximum temp is the mean maximum air temperature and vapour pressure is the mean vapour pressure. The indoor climate is from our study homes and outdoor climate values are from the 100 grid cells that are the most climatically similar to the mean home indoor climate. The box plots display data range, quartiles and median with dots as outliers. Figure was generated with R (version 3.3.2; http://www.R-project.org) package ggplot2 (version 2.2.0; http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=ggplot2).

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Article
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Human engineering of the outdoors led to the development of the indoor niche, including home construction. However, it is unlikely that domicile construction mechanics are under direct selection for humans. Nonetheless, our preferences within indoor environments are, or once were, consequential to our fitness. The research of human homes does not u...

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... troglodytes) and Bornean orangutans (P. pygmaeus) have body temperatures nearly equal to that of humans (Just et al., 2019). Thus, perhaps the most parsimonious hypothesis is that the mean body temperature has not undergone alteration during the course of hominin evolution. ...
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... troglodytes) and Bornean orangutans (P. pygmaeus) have body temperatures nearly equal to that of humans [80]. Several species of Euarchonta (which encompasses primates) evince body temperatures < 35 • C [60]. ...
Preprint
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