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Block diagram of the device's working process

Block diagram of the device's working process

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Haptic interfaces allow a more realistic experience with Virtual Reality (VR). They are used to manipulate virtual objects. These objects can be rigid and soft. In this letter, we have designed and evaluated a vibrotactile hand-held device (VibeRo) to achieve haptic cues of different soft objects. The proposed method is based on combining the visio...

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... the FSR readings -through transmission control protocol (TCP) socket communication -to the Unity game engine installed PC. The Unity installed PC is configured as the server. While the BBB is a client that sends FSR analog signals (F N ) and a discrete value received from the Teensy board which represents a current working mode of the setup. Fig. 6 exemplifies the block diagram of the communication pipeline between the VibeRo and the PC. Unity3D game-engine is used to project simulated surroundings onto the Oculus HMD. In Unity, we created an environment, similar to the real world, with a virtual hand model and a soft object. The animation is processed using a built-in Unity ...

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... A handheld device (PaCaPa) can provide proprioceptive feedback to render size, shape, and stiffness in VR (Sun et al., 2019). Tasbi and Vibero feature squeeze and vibrotactile feedback combined with pseudohaptics to provide sensations of contact and stiffness in VR (Pezent et al., 2019(Pezent et al., , 2020Adilkhanov et al., 2020). Finally, ultrasound as a mid-air free-hand technology, is able to simulate varying stiffness sensations in VR (Marchal et al., 2020). ...
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Chapter
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Thesis
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