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Block diagram for AES encryption and decryption 

Block diagram for AES encryption and decryption 

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Article
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Protection of multimedia information from different types of attackers and send it over communication channels has become important for people and governments. The form of reconstructed image from an actual transmission channel is an important challenge faces the ciphering algorithms. MAES algorithm is an important modified version of AES algorithm...

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Context 1
... The AES algorithm consist of sequences of 128 bits for each input and output. Sometimes these sequences will be referred to as blocks where the number of bits they include, will be referred to as their length. The AES algorithm cipher key is a sequence of 128, 192 or 256 bits. Ten rounds are on AES algorithm encryption, as can be shown in Fig. (1). Initially, the 128-bit key is expanded into eleven so-called round keys, each of them 128 bits in size. To ensure high security of the encryption each round contain transformation by utilize the corresponding key of cipher. The mentioned sizes state in above is only permit sizes while the other sizes are not allowed. Input block is ...
Context 2
... visual scene of original secret, ciphered transmitted, ciphered received and reconstructed images are viewed and compared to check the effect of channel on the image for two values of SNR only, where the tests of other SNR values shown in appendices. Figures (7-14) show the images visual scene for four tests. As clearly shown the difference between transmitted and received ciphered images is so little such that the human eyes cannot sense this difference for all tests and ...
Context 3
... factor used to evaluate in two direction, one by comparing between the histogram of transmitted and received ciphered images, while the other by comparing between histogram of original and extracted versions of secret image. As shown in Figure 13, the histogram of two versions of secret images are much compatible especially with 20 dB as in 13-c, which mean the encryption algorithm was more stronger against channels problems. Figure 14 is also confirm this analysis. ...
Context 4
... shown in Figure 13, the histogram of two versions of secret images are much compatible especially with 20 dB as in 13-c, which mean the encryption algorithm was more stronger against channels problems. Figure 14 is also confirm this analysis. ...
Context 5
... 5000 pair of adjacent pixels was randomly selected from tests images. Figure 15 shows the correlation coefficients of original and reconstructed version of secret images for four tests used. as clearly shown in Figure the correlation coefficient of original and extracted images was so convergence especially with SNR equal to 20 dB (15.c), ...

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Citations

... Only the Mix Columns transformation is bypassed in the last round. Pseudocode of AES encryption process is given below and the decryption includes the inverse transformations of each step in the encryption [29]. ...
Chapter
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... Şekil 4 AES algoritması blok diyagramı [26] 3. Resim Şifreleme Uygulaması ve Güvenlik/Performans Testleri Şekil ...
... AES encryption algorithm[10].Advanced Encryption Standard algorithmAdvanced Encryption Standard (AES) comprises three block ciphers: AES-128, AES-192 and AES-256. Each cipher encrypts and decrypts data in blocks of 128 bits using cryptographic keys of 128-, 192-and 256-bits[11].Figure 2.5 shows the AES encryption algorithm The encryption algorithm goes through five phases in each round where each phase does a certain function to encrypt the data. ...
... In[10]:= iv=enc["InitializationVector"]; iv//Normal; ...