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Bioswale concept diagram: (1) Dirty and polluted water from rooftops, roads and parking lots enters the bioswale; (2) Water is slowed down by various plants and rocks, pollutants settle out, clean water infiltrates the soil; (3) Water enters the perforated pipe and is slowly absorbed into the ground; (4) Excess stormwater exits the bioswale and flows through the pipe into the recipient, cleaner then when it entered and in the amount significantely reduced. Source: http://www.cranejapan.co/grass-bioswale-diagram.html

Bioswale concept diagram: (1) Dirty and polluted water from rooftops, roads and parking lots enters the bioswale; (2) Water is slowed down by various plants and rocks, pollutants settle out, clean water infiltrates the soil; (3) Water enters the perforated pipe and is slowly absorbed into the ground; (4) Excess stormwater exits the bioswale and flows through the pipe into the recipient, cleaner then when it entered and in the amount significantely reduced. Source: http://www.cranejapan.co/grass-bioswale-diagram.html

Source publication
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The experience in stromwater management shows that traditional stormwater systems are often unable to absorb and process all of the excess water runoff, resulting in frequent flash flooding in urban areas. Contemporary approaches suggest the implementation of vegetated swales as green infrastructure that is an alternative or a supplement to traditi...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... these hard materials before they enter our drinking water system is of crucial importance for the sustainability of rivers and streams. The way of functioning of a bioswale is illustrated in Figure 1. (1) Dirty and polluted water from rooftops, roads and parking lots enters the bioswale; (2) Water is slowed down by various plants and rocks, pollutants settle out, clean water infiltrates the soil; (3) Water enters the perforated pipe and is slowly absorbed into the ground; (4) Excess stormwater exits the bioswale and flows through the pipe into the recipient, cleaner then when it entered and in the amount significantely reduced. ...

Citations

... Implementing contemporary integrated stormwater management approaches, complemented with the elements of blue and green infrastructure, is the final instrument of urban planning and design that is considered to be of great significance in preventing flooding. Namely, increasing urbanization has resulted in the increase of paved surfaces in urban areas, which are usually impervious, and thereby alter both the quantity and quality of surface runoff water [10]. In terms of quantity, less water is infiltrated and more runs off at the surface, which affects the physical structure of streams and rivers, and may cause flash flooding. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Within an integrated planning approach, urban streams are a valuable natural resource with strategic significance for creating resilient cities. This paper explores the revitalization of small urban streams within sustainable development practices, and discusses the manifold benefits that it brings about. Best practice examples are presented to illustrate how watercourse revitalization improves flood mitigation and stormwater treatment, strengthens urban ecology, diversifies recreation options, and enhances visual appeal of the waterfront. These experiences are used to establish urban planning and design guidelines for revitalization of small streams in the City of Niš. The results of this study should help with both setting up policy framework and implementation in planning practice.
... Bioswales design35 ...
Preprint
Full-text available
This chapter addresses some of the most fundamental questions asked by those who need to understand the flood risk faced by their cities and towns:-Where is the flooding coming from?-Why urban flood specifically?-What impact does flooding have on urban areas?-What the effect does urbanization has on flood risk?-what are existing non-structural, and structural mitigation measures for urban flooding?-What is the urban planning tools' role in flood risk reduction for cities and towns and their inhabitants? The key messages from this Chapter are:-Understanding the type and source of flooding are both essential if the appropriate flood risk reduction measures are to be identified.-Rapid urbanization severely challenges existing flood management infrastructure and putting life and properties at high risk when it is not well planned.-Identifying the existing non-structural, and structural mitigation measures for urban flooding-Land use planning and regulation of new development is a central measure for reducing future flood risk, particularly in rapidly urbanizing emerging economies.-Sustainable infrastructure for stormwater management through landscape architecture and its role in flash flood risk reduction.
Thesis
Bu tez çalışmasında UI GreenMetric Sistemini'nin değerlendirilerek, sürdürülebilir ve yeşil kampüslerin planlaması sürecinde ihtiyaç duyulun planlama yöntemi belirlenmiştir. UI GreenMetric Sistemi'nin değerlendirilmesi sonucunda, GreenMetric sisteminin peyzaj ekolojisi yaklaşımını ve yeşil altyapı uygulamalarını içerdiği görülmüştür. Bu yaklaşımlar kapsamında planlama stratejileri ve ilkeleri oluşturulmuş ve İzmir Demokrasi Üniversitesi Uzundere Kampüsü Peyzaj Master Planı hazırlanmıştır. Hazırlanan Peyzaj Master Planı, UI GreenMetric Değerlendirme Sistemi'ne göre puanlanmıştır. Puanlama sonucunda, İzmir Demokrasi Üniversitesi Uzundere Kampüsü'nün, 3025 puan alabileceği ve bu puan ile dünya sıralamasına girebileceği görülmüştür. Bu sonuç, sürdürülebilir ve yeşil kampüslerin planlama ve tasarım sürecinde, henüz sürecin başında UI GreenMetric Değerlendirme Sistemi'nin referans alınmasının önemli avantajlar sağlayacağını ortaya koymuştur.
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter highlights some substantial questions inquired by researchers to comprehend the flood risks (FRs) that occur in their cities as follows: (1) What is the impact of flooding on urban areas? (2) what effect does urbanization have on FR? (3) What are the existing nonstructural and structural mitigation measures for urban flooding? and (4) What is the role of urban planning and landscape tools in flood risk reduction (FRR) for cities as well as their inhabitants? The main messages in this chapter could be summarized as follows: (1) Comprehension of both the sources and types of flooding is vital if proper FRR measures are to be determined, (2) Unplanned urban growth could seriously put lives and properties at high risk (3) Land use planning and regulation, and Sustainable infrastructure for stormwater management through landscape archi- tecture are fundamental measures for future FRR (4) The application of the urban planning approach for FRR in arid and semiarid regions has not yet received adequate attention and facing many challenges for its implementation, and finally (5) the combination of structural and nonstructural mitigation measures in spatial planning could be much more effective than using one type of measure alone.