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''Beloved Stalin is the People's Happiness'' (1949). The Beloved Leader with His Happy People. Authors' Collection of Soviet Posters.  

''Beloved Stalin is the People's Happiness'' (1949). The Beloved Leader with His Happy People. Authors' Collection of Soviet Posters.  

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Contemporary scholarship has noted Mikhail M. Bakhtin's apparent animosity toward rhetoric. Bakhtin's distinction between monologue and dialogue helps to explain his view of rhetoric, which is both hostile and receptive—hostile to monologic rhetoric but receptive to a dialogic rhetoric that is responsive to others. This article reads Bakhtin's acco...

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... posters link Stalin by association with claims of the ever-increasing accomplishments of the worker and persist from the mid to late 1930s through the end of World War II to Stalin's death. One of these posters, ''Beloved Stalin is the people's happiness'' (Figure 5), displays the adulation of the leader by the masses of festively dressed and appropriately excited men, women, and children. The occasion is a holiday parade in the Red Square (most likely the May Day), with Stalin (stand- ing on the Mausoleum housing Lenin's embalmed remains) looming above the crowds carrying red banners, flowers, and portraits of Lenin and other Soviet lea- ders. ...

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