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Baseline data of the HIV cohort and TB incidence rates

Baseline data of the HIV cohort and TB incidence rates

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Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of death in HIV patients worldwide. Here we describe the epidemiology and outcome of HIV-TB co-infections in a high-income country with low TB incidence and integrated HIV and TB therapy according to European guidelines. Methods This study was based on the HIV cohort of the Helsinki University Hospital...

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Context 1
... 1998 and 2015 there were 1939 HIV-positives on regular follow up in our cohort (Table 1). Among the HIV-TB cases, the place of birth was Finland in 25 cases and Sub-Saharan Africa in 12 cases. ...
Context 2
... countries of birth seen in those classified as others were Thailand in 9 cases, Estonia in two cases, Germany in one case, Lithuania in one case and Egypt in one case. The mean CD4 counts at the time of TB diagnosis for the different subgroups presented in Table 1 , place of birth other 146 (9-561). ...
Context 3
... incidence rates of TB in different subgroups of HIV-positives are shown in Table 1. The incidence rates in the range of 100-700 cases per 100,000 population are very high compared to the current general TB incidence rate of 5 cases per 100,000 in Finland. ...

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... HIV care in Finland is free of charge, and patients can initiate ART upon diagnosis. There have been clinical studies of physical health outcomes among HIV patients in Finland and of HIV epidemiology in the country (e.g., Holmberg et al., 2019). However, social sciences empirical research into the experience of living with HIV in low prevalence countries, such as Finland, has been lacking. ...
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... It has been shown that TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome can develop when ART is initiated (Worodria et al., 2011;Abay et al., 2015;Haridas et al., 2015;Boulougoura and Sereti, 2016). Importantly, ART-controlled HIV infection appears to interfere with TB infection (Worodria et al., 2018;Holmberg et al., 2019). ...
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