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Balance test regressions for pre-intervention period (December 2014-April 2015) I II III IV 

Balance test regressions for pre-intervention period (December 2014-April 2015) I II III IV 

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The applied behavioural literature has found green nudges to be effective mechanisms for reducing residential water and energy consumption. This study estimates the impact of several such behavioural interventions on residential water consumption in Cape Town, South Africa-a setting characterised by both water austerity and extreme income inequalit...

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... test whether the treatment and control groups are balanced in the pre-intervention period across the now familiar demographic characteristics: monthly consumption, daily average consumption, number of billing days (over the month) and property value. The estimates reported in Table 4 (2009), we control for stratification by including tariff block and suburb dummy variables in the regressions. 5 The table indicates that the treatment and control groups are balanced on key characteristics such as consumption, daily average consumption and property value. ...

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