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Bakelite molecular formula: (C16H26O2)n[7]  

Bakelite molecular formula: (C16H26O2)n[7]  

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Article
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Bakelite material has been used to produce the various components for cars and consumer goods industry in Thailand. The growth of Bakelite consumption increases Bakelite waste. Bakelite waste is prohibited from disposing of direct landfilling and open burning because of the improper disposal and emission reasons. A large amount of this waste needs...

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... The 28-days density of Waste Bakelite Mortar (WBM) was lower than Conventional Mortar (CM) which equal to 2,136 kg/m3 because of the density of WBFA is 16.36% lower than sand. The density of WBM in each WBFA proportion was shown in Fig. ...

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Citations

... This shows that the particle size of waste material has played an important role in developing paver block strength. Compared to the waste marble study, waste marble is well usable instead of the usual aggregate in the concrete paving block production [48]. A study on the lime as filler material [49] showed in Fig.8, the compressive strength value of a mixture of 10% lime with curing of time 28 days is 42.27 Mpa. ...
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... The reduction of WB in a hammer mill and classification by sieve follows the procedure used by Usahanunth and Tuprakay [11], the process is illustrated in Fig. 1. ...
... The use of WBFA as fine aggregate in cement mortar has been studied by Usahanunth and Tuprakay [11]. In this paper, the follow-up of their study involves an extended study of the use of WBCA and WBFA in concrete. ...
... In this study, the materials for mixing concrete include the following: (1) Portland cement Type 1, conforming to the specification of TIS15-2547 [12]; (2) natural fine aggregate (NFA), which is natural sand and follows ASTM C136 [13], as shown in Fig. 4(b); (3) natural coarse aggregate (NCA), which is crushed stone and follows ASTM C136 [13], as shown in Fig. 5(b); (4) waste Bakelite fine aggregate, conforming to ASTM C136 [13], shown in Fig. 4(a) and used to replace NFA; (5) waste Bakelite coarse aggregate used as coarse aggregate to replace NCA, conforming to ASTM C136 [13], as shown in Fig. 5 a); and (6) plain water, the quality of which complies with ASTM C1602 [14]. The mix design of mortar samples followed the mix from Usahanunth and Tuprakay [11]. The mix design of concrete samples in this study was prepared based on a water-cement ratio equal to 0.53 [4,10], and the same water-cement ratio as WBM [11]. ...
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... The curing water sample obtained from a water curing basin which contains three cube specimens (volume equals to 0.01 m3) of concrete mixed with 12% waste Bakelite coarse aggregate and filled with 150 liters of curing water.The Phenol and Formaldehyde test result were shown in Table 3. As well as, the quantities of six heavy metals which may effect to the environment and people health were refered from the test of [17] as presented in Table 4.The test methods based on standard methods for examination water and wastewater 22nd Edition (2012).The test result was shown in Table 3. ...
... Curing water verification of six heavy metals from[17,132]. found in the water sample less than the effluent standard specified by [18] as well as the Soluble Threshold Limit Concentration (STLC) of hazardous waste.[19] ...
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This study reports the investigation of the waste thermosetting polymer, Bakelite (BAK), as a reinforcement along with ceramic particles (silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3)) in recycled thermoplastic acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) matrix for better sustainability. The ABS composite matrix has been prepared using a twin-screw extrusion (TSE) process. For mechanical testing and thermal stability analysis, conventional universal tensile testing and differential scanning calorimetry set-up has been used. The results of the study suggest that best mechanical properties were attained without the reinforcement of ceramic particles (90% ABS–10% BAK–0% SiC–0% Al2O3 by wt%), but ceramic reinforcements contributed to thermal stability of the matrix.
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India places 3rd in the world for the consumption of plastic wastes. The road transport system gives many benefits to people, communities and the local economy. The road sector produces the highest level of greenhouse gases directly, through fossil energy used in mining, transportation, paving works and indirectly through the emissions coming from vehicles. Non biodegradable products plastic and rubber stay for a long time on site and cause environmental pollution. As an alternative, bakelite and plastics can be used for the road and pavement construction. This paper also helps us to know about the general properties and characteristics of waste plastics and bakelite.