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Backtracking algorithm (taken from [1]). 

Backtracking algorithm (taken from [1]). 

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Conference Paper
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Predictive business process monitoring methods exploit historical process execution logs to provide predictions about running instances of a process, which enable process workers and managers to preempt performance issues or compliance violations. A number of approaches have been proposed to predict quantitative process performance indicators, suc...

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... [1], cases are replayed using a heuristics-based backtracking algorithm that searches for the best alignment between the model and a partial trace. e algorithm can be illustrated by a traversal of a process tree starting from the root node, e.g. using depth--rst search, where nodes represent partial candidate solution states (Figure 3). Here the state represents the aforementioned alignment state of the case replay. At each node, the algorithm checks whether the alignment state till that node is good enough. If so, it generates a set of child nodes of that node and continues down that path; otherwise, it stops at that node, i.e. it prunes the branch under the node, and backtracks to the parent node to traverse other branches. ...

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Citations

... A review of the literature reveals three primary predictive process monitoring approaches: model-based approaches [4,9], sequence-to-feature encoding (STEP) approaches [10,11], and simulation-based approaches [12,13]. ...
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... Additionally, in Bai and Sarkis (2013), the authors treat only the implementation phase of BPM life cycle for the same BP types. Then, several approaches have been proposed for the monitor phase to predict quantitative process performance metrics, such as remaining cycle time, cost, or probability of deadline violation (Leontjeva et al., 2015;Maggi et al., 2014;Metzger et al., 2012 ;Pika et al., 2012;Verenich et al., 2017) for the support and operational BPs. In ...
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