Table 4 - uploaded by Pietro Della Sala
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Average total dry weight, in grams per plant, of maize and bean in two soils across the nutrition levels(left) and at three different levels of nutrition across the two soil types(right). It is furthermore shown the effect of splitting the dose.

Average total dry weight, in grams per plant, of maize and bean in two soils across the nutrition levels(left) and at three different levels of nutrition across the two soil types(right). It is furthermore shown the effect of splitting the dose.

Source publication
Research
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A small study about the early stages of growth in Zea mays and Phaseolus vulgaris grown in different conditions of soil and nutrients availability done in the context of a master course in research methods. This paper wass only an exercise.

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... total dry weight (TDW) in maize was lower than bean in both soils but the gap is higher in case of quartz sand. The two species grew better in sandy soil rather than quartz sand, the difference was more evident in case of maize than bean (Table 4). In maize the fertilization with 5% of the nutrition is not sufficient to have a significant increase in the biomass production while raising the dose to 50% it is. ...
Context 2
... first species in soils with poor or null amounts of nutrients produces respectively 0.86 and 0.79 times the total dry weight at high levels of fertilization while the bean pass from a minimum fraction of 0.96 with no nutrition to 1.05 times with a low input of 5% of nu- trition. In both species there is an increase on 5% in total dry weight per plant due to the splitting of the high dose although is not significant (Table 4). The TDW in quartz sand was significantly lower than in sandy soil only for 0% and 5% of nutrition. ...
Context 3
... dry weight production of both species is, in fact, higher in sandy soil than quartz sand and always in- creases with the level of nutrition, but the gap in maize is always larger than bean (see Table 4). The higher gaps in dry weight between high and low nutrition or between sandy and quartz soil may be related with the seeds weight and composition of the two species. ...
Context 4
... explanation for this is that the latter paper reasoned on the final yields and we are reasoning only on a very limited time window of the plant's growth and it is possible that considering a longer period or the entire vital cycle of the plants there may be a difference .This could be investigated further in a future research. The total dry weight production is not in- fluenced by the splitting of the dose in maize (Table 4) and in bean it seems to have an effect if compared with the same level of nutrition, 50%, but not if compared with 5% nutrition. The explanation for maize be- havior is, as for the shoot-root ratio, the fact that we are considering a very limited period of time while for bean's situation we need to make further considerations. ...
Context 5
... Table 4 and Table 5 it is possible to see that this situation was founded only for bean and only in the sandy soil, richer of nutrients in itself and less affected by leaching. Our conclusion is that bean in sandy soil may be stressed by high concentration of not uptaken ions around the roots that induced a mild saline stress, even without evident symptoms at leaf level, leading to a minor photosynthetic area due to less cell elongation and consequently less dry weight accumulation (Shalhevet et al. 1995); this is in addition partly supported by Grattan and Grieve (1998). ...