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Average size of residential dwellings in selected European countries, m 2 (Entranze data tool 2017).

Average size of residential dwellings in selected European countries, m 2 (Entranze data tool 2017).

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Technical Report
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This document identifies interventions that might work across energy cultures and be adaptable to different infrastructures and socio-economic conditions across Europe. This work builds on the results of the typologies of sustainable energy consumption initiatives and a careful and critical analysis which has engaged the ENERGISE consortium members...

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Context 1
... 2009). There are great differences among European countries in this respect, as shown in Figure 2, with average dwelling size ranging from about 60 m 2 in Estonia, Latvia and Romania to more than 100 m 2 in Portugal, Denmark, Ireland and Cyprus. Larger dwellings consume more energy, but multiple rooms offer the opportunity for regulating temperatures when rooms are not used. ...

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