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Average blackout costs, after 100 simulations of reciprocally altruistic control agents for 5 different scenarios. As the amount of altruism (the size of the agents' neighborhoods, r ) increases the quality of the results approaches what we would get from a single agent with perfect knowledge of the power grid.  

Average blackout costs, after 100 simulations of reciprocally altruistic control agents for 5 different scenarios. As the amount of altruism (the size of the agents' neighborhoods, r ) increases the quality of the results approaches what we would get from a single agent with perfect knowledge of the power grid.  

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Power grids are complex dynamical systems, and because of this complexity it is unlikely that we will completely eliminate blackouts. However, there are things that can be done to reduce the average size and cost of these blackouts. In this article we described two strategies that hold substantial promise for reducing the size and cost of blackouts...

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... negotiating with its neighbors, Agent a executes any control actions that need to be taken locally, such as shedding load, switch- ing capacitors on or off, or changing generator set points, and then returns to collecting data and sharing it with its neighbors. By considering not only local goals, but also the goals of its neighbors, the agents are able to dramatically reduce the average size of set of simulated cascading fail- ures ( Fig. 7 ). ...

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