Average and median weight of plastic Bottles. 

Average and median weight of plastic Bottles. 

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Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), a polyester based thermoplastic polymer, is used worldwide for packaging foods and beverages. The sharp rise of PET application has increased potential hazards on human health and environment. The main objective of the study was to determine the amount of plastic waste that was generated from bottled drinking water...

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... Tabuk, PET water bottled is produced by 7 companies, and mostly 4 sizes of water bottle are produced by them, such as 250mL, 330mL, 600mL and 1.5L. Initially, median weight of aforementioned bottles as shown in Table 1, was multiplied by the weighted average of survey responses to generate daily plastic water bottle consumption in Tabuk. It is noted that weight of bottles wasn't constraint for a distinctive size of the bottle, and therefore the average dry weight of bottles was adopted in this study. ...

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