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Average Within-Subject Correlations for Items Used in Composite Variables (Study 1) Variable 1 

Average Within-Subject Correlations for Items Used in Composite Variables (Study 1) Variable 1 

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H. T. Reis and P. Shaver's (1988) interpersonal process model of intimacy suggests that both self-disclosure and partner responsiveness contribute to the experience of intimacy in interactions. Two studies tested this model using an event-contingent diary methodology in which participants provided information immediately after their social interact...

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Context 1
... HLM, we calculated the average within-subject corre- lations for items within the self-disclosure and partner disclosure composite variables. These correlations are presented in Ta- ble 1. ...

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... Although more research is needed to establish the benefits associated with cultural sharing, successful intercultural couples are often aware of and curious about their differences (Ting-Toomey, 2011), which can be linked to more supportive and effective communication about culture. Effective communication and feeling understood in general enhance intimate feelings in romantic relationships (Laurenceau et al., 1998). In intercultural relationships, in which misunderstandings are more likely to occur (Holoien et al., 2015), effective and supportive communication may be especially important to fostering relationship success. ...
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Intercultural romantic relationships are increasingly common and although the obstacles such couples face are well documented, the factors that facilitate their success are less studied. Although cultural differences may present challenges, they also offer opportunities for self-expansion—personal growth via new perspectives, knowledge, and identities. In three studies using cross-sectional, dyadic, longitudinal, and experimental methods ( N Total = 896), self-expansion was associated with relationship quality and identity outcomes (i.e., identity integration, cultural self-awareness). Self-expanding through a partner’s culture (i.e., cultural self-expansion) was uniquely related to identity outcomes, beyond self-expanding more generally ( relational self-expansion). Furthermore, actively sharing cultures and discussing their differences were linked to greater cultural and relational self-expansion, which in turn differentially predicted partners’ relationship quality and cultural identities. These studies provide a first look at the role of self-expansion in intercultural relationships, demonstrating that the way couples negotiate their cultures is linked to both relational and personal outcomes.
... When suppression is used as an emotional expression strategy, it tends to subdue not only negative emotions but also the positive responses as well. 31 As a consequence, lack of positive emotions tends to inhibit the sustenance of cordial social relationships wherein individual desires to withdraw or inhibit or show disinterest in social transactions. 32 Thus, suppression accounts for the commensurate drop in expressing positive emotions, creating incongruence in the authenticity of individual's emotional expression. ...
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... Self-disclosure is a precondition for any social relationship (Laurenceau et al., 1998). It is expressed in terms of individuals' willingness to reveal details relating to their status, life events, and aspirations (Deci and Ryan, 2011), and serves several purposes, such as increasing mutual understanding (Laurenceau et al., 1998), and building trust between partners to a relationship (Rubin, 1975). ...
... Self-disclosure is a precondition for any social relationship (Laurenceau et al., 1998). It is expressed in terms of individuals' willingness to reveal details relating to their status, life events, and aspirations (Deci and Ryan, 2011), and serves several purposes, such as increasing mutual understanding (Laurenceau et al., 1998), and building trust between partners to a relationship (Rubin, 1975). Moreover, disclosure enables people to identify and integrate meaning into their prior processes and experiences (Frattaroli, 2006). ...
... Moreover, research shows that feelings of daily intimacy and marital satisfaction are correlated with perceived responsiveness (Laurenceau et al., 1998). In line with this finding, our second hypothesis (H2) is that a positive correlation will be found between intimacy and engagement in the online sphere. ...
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... In relationships, stress is often characterized by greater disconnection and social withdrawal (Repetti et al., 2009;Schulz et al., 2004), but perceived partner responsiveness may promote better coping and support provision by facilitating experiences of closeness and open communication (Manne et al., 2018), even during times of stress (Repetti, 1989;Williamson et al., 2013). Perceived partner responsiveness tends to make people feel safe to reveal their needs and vulnerabilities to their partners (Clark & Lemay, 2010;Laurenceau et al., 1998) and can help promote confidence that a partner is willing to provide responsive support (see Reis et al., 2017), which may be protective against the negative consequences of stressors. ...
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... As an important construct in intimacy research, PPR is considered the "central organizing structure" of relationship research [3]. PPR can not only promote an individual's psychological health and relationship quality or relational satisfaction with a partner by increasing the individual's intellectual humility and encouraging their emotional expression but also explain the relationship among self-disclosure, partner disclosure, and intimacy through its mediating effect [4][5][6][7]. ...
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... If the other person reacts positively to what is expressed, there is a greater chance that the relationship between the two people will be strengthened as a result (Reis and Shaver 1988, p. 375). According to Laurenceau et al. (1998), intimacy develops over repeated interactions over time and is important for the user to open up emotionally. With each interaction, a perception is formed that reflects the level of intimacy and the meaning of the relationship. ...
... For the user to perceive the communication as engaging, the voice assistant should try to understand, accept, and validate the user in factual and emotional contexts. According to Laurenceau et al. (1998), in any interaction, perceived qualities and individual differences can influence the user's behavior. If the perceived motives and needs differ strongly from the interests of the counterpart, this can have a negative influence. ...
... If the relationship between the user and the voice assistant is to be strengthened, it is also important that the mutual exchange of personally relevant information or emotions takes place (Laurenceau et al. 1998). This poses a challenge because social robots do not have an actual ability to feel and suffer (Bendel 2021). ...
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... The notion is that self-disclosure may help to cognitively process cancer-related thoughts and feelings and make sense of the cancer experience, leading to emotional acceptance (Lepore, 2001). Similarly, the relationship intimacy model suggests that reciprocal self-disclosure is associated with higher levels of relationship intimacy via perceived partner responsiveness (Laurenceau, Barrett, & Pietromonaco, 1998;Manne & Badr, 2008). However, some studies suggest that disclosure is not always beneficial. ...
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Extensive literature addresses the correlates of communication behaviors within couples in the specific stressful context of oncology. This literature focused mainly on the concepts of disclosure, concealment, holding back and protective buffering to gain more insight into the potential benefit of open communication on the psychological and relational wellbeing of the patient, the spouse and the dyad. The current systematic review aims to present this literature, summarize research findings and suggest empirical, theoretical and clinical implications. Methods: The search method applied in this review was in line with the PRISMA guidelines. Key words related to couples' communication and oncology were used to identify relevant studies according to title and abstract fields from 1.1.2000 until 31.1.22. Results: Out of 3277 papers, a total of 55 articles were identified as relevant for this review. These quantitative studies used cross-sectional and longitudinal designs. Overall, integrating findings from different studies showed that while avoiding communication is negatively associated with psychological and relational wellbeing, the benefit of disclosure seems to be dependent on different factors including the partner's responsiveness, contextual factors and personal characteristics. The existing literature is limited in providing data regarding the nature of adequate or helpful partner responses, the best timing, and the specific topics that are recommended to be disclosed such as specific fears. Most importantly, it is limited in heterogeneity of constructs of communication that were studied, scales that were used and diverse mediators and moderators that were examined. Accordingly, an effort to reach consensus of definition and assessment of communicative behavior is recommended for future studies, and addressing responsiveness to communicative initiations seems to be important for clinical practice.