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Annette Schmid & Veerle Pennock: "SMELL FAX", view of the prototype. Photo credits: Annette Schmid.

Annette Schmid & Veerle Pennock: "SMELL FAX", view of the prototype. Photo credits: Annette Schmid.

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Citations

... In recognising this tendency in HCI, Heinzel et. al [5] proposes reconsidering concepts and prototypes that were considered failures at the time of their making. Plainly said, to work against our tendency to edit out knowledge that does not fit in the current narrative of a project. ...
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Materially driven research can often feel like a long series of failed experiments, which ends with us telling only the story of how we succeeded. We propose engaging with the making experience as travelers, losing ourselves in the making while preserving the outcomes of each experiment. In doing so, we might be able to, on one hand document this iterative journey as a research outcome in itself and, on the other, identify the roads not travelled as opportunities and starting points for new projects. We present an open ended exploration that led us to articulating the possibilities of becoming travelers in the design process.
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Digital Craftsmanship, and other explorative design research practices using digital fabrication, depend on sample making and material exploration. Rather than describing a method of making use of the information present in samples co-inhabiting a timeline, this pictorial reports on the loose ends that may emerge out of the main journey, when taking a traveler's approach to making. By loose ends, we mean successful samples that are not suitable to the main inquiry of the present design research process, but that under certain circumstances can become starting points for new investigation lines. We describe four examples of such loose ends and introduce the concept of fellow travelers as a metaphor for describing the process of co-inhabiting a timeline and a journey while ultimately having diverging goals and outcomes.