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Analytic pipeline for network analysis (prior to community detection)

Analytic pipeline for network analysis (prior to community detection)

Source publication
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Full-text available
Recent work within the language sciences, particularly bilingualism, has sought new methods to evaluate and characterize how people differentially use language across different communicative contexts. These differences have thus far been linked to changes in cognitive control strategy, reading behavior, and brain organization. Here, we approach thi...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... analytic pipeline, shown in Figure 2 (full code available at https://osf.io/6z79s/), transformed the raw survey responses into an adjacency matrix that was used to compute the network measures in R (R Core Team, 2016). ...
Context 2
... both of these networks, we did not remove any topics or apply any thresholding prior to calculating the three network measures. Moreover, for both networks, our aim was to describe -at a global group level -patterns of the sample as a whole (i.e., we opted for the aggregate final step in Figure 2). ...
Context 3
... Networks. As can be seen in the left stream of Figure 2, the first adjacency matrix was used to make five context networks for each participant (i.e., one network per communicative context). Here, we assessed the conversational topics bilinguals discussed in each context (collapsed across languages). ...
Context 4
... Networks. As can be seen in the right stream of Figure 2, the second adjacency emotional and chit chat were both discussed in the dominant language, we gave that pairing a value of 1). Next, we weighted each edge to reflect the total number of contexts in which those two topics were discussed in the same language (e.g., if emotional and chit chat were both discussed in the dominant language across all five contexts, the edge weight would be high. ...
Context 5
... each of the context and language networks, we used the igraph package in R (Csárdi & Nepusz, 2006) to calculate three basic network measures: network size, mean network strength, and network density (this process is demonstrated within the shaded central portion of Figure 2). ...
Context 6
... interest was motivated by past psycholinguistic findings that some topics, such as discussing emotions, are typically reserved for the first, or more dominant language (Ardila, Benettieri, Church, Orozco, & Saucedo, 2019; Dewaele, 2015). Thus, we next identify the steps taken to perform community detection on our two language networks (not depicted in Figure 2). ...
Context 7
... average network structure for each communicative context is illustrated in Figure 4 (i.e., we aggregated network measures across all subjects to understand group-level behavior -the bottom right option from Figure 2). As can be seen from these figures (and Table 3), some contexts seem to share size and weight similarities (e.g., home and family) whereas others visibly vary (e.g., work and social). ...

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