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Alex McDowell's World Building Mandala (2015) 

Alex McDowell's World Building Mandala (2015) 

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The worldbuilding practices of science fiction authors have the potential to play a key role in society, given that they involve the design and depiction of complex, alternative realities set in the future. This potential is acknowledged by Transition Design--an emerging area of practice that melds futures-based narratives, foresight, and systems-t...

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Context 1
... in film happens at earlier stage when writers, directors, production designers, etc. bring together their expertise to create worlds. Alex McDowell - Professor at the School of Cinematic Arts at University of Southern California, and Director of the World Building Media Lab (WbML) and 5D Global Studio -has developed a worldbuilding model for film and virtual reality, known as the Worldbuilding Mandala (see Figure 7). McDowell's model integrates elements of story and worldbuilding, beginning with 'what if' and 'why not' origin questions and extrapolating out to develop context, ecologies, and domains (2015). ...

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The Diamond Star is a personal foresight method that proposes a creative exercise to discover individual possibility. It helps to open imagination and envision multiple pathways toward a future by utilizing values assessment to align one's vision with deeply held values and commitments.

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... However, course instructors need to be careful with the amount of dystopian storytelling they apply to the class since it may leave the reader no hope of escape from the unpleasant realities (Jameson, 2005) and thus limits visioning capabilities. Besides utopian and dystopian storytelling, science-fiction-related reading assignments can help to explore and envision different futures (Bina et al., 2017;Rajaniemi & Weisman, 2019;Zaidi, 2017) or engage in worldbuilding (McDowell, 2019;Zaidi, 2019). One of these (sustainable) future narratives is called "solarpunk" (Razaghi, 2019;Reina-Rozo, 2021;Williams, 2019). ...
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This book gives insights into important factors that are shaping effective learning for sustainability and describes innovative teaching formats that will enable students to contribute to a more sustainable world in their future role as decision makers. Basic concepts in the context of sustainability-related teaching and learning are defined and the relation between learning objectives, methods, skills and outcomes is conceptualised. The book’s detailed description of 23 teaching formats, including their learning objectives, course contents and structure, as well as applied methods aims at supporting lecturers and trainers in the design of their own teaching formats. With conbtributions by Pilar Acosta, Bimal Arora, Hasret Balcioglu, Diana Bank Weinberg, Maria Angeles Bustamante Gallego, Silke Bustamante, Julen Castillo-Apraiz, Helen Chiappini, Arrate Lasa Elguezua, Iñaki Etaio Alonso, Diego Rada Fernandez de Jauregui, Irene Garnelo-Gomez, Jonatan Miranda Gomez, Zsuzsanna Győri, Tony Henshaw, Igor Hernandez Ochoa, Mark Hoyle, Maria V. Ilieva, Divya Jyoti, Achilleas Karayiannis, Prashan S. M. Karunaratne, Philipp Kenel, William Kitch, Tetiana Kravchenko, Idoia Larretxi Lamelas, Edurne Simón Magro, Olaia Martinez Gonzalez, Martina Martinovic, Virginia Navarro Santamaria, Maria, Nemilentseva, Rana Parweeen, Andrea Pelzeter, Daria Podmetina, Manuel Quirós, Ellen Saltevo, Marina Schmitz, Elena Senatorova, Kai Shaman, Aušrinė Šilenskytė, Julia Solovjova, Unai Tamayo Orbegozo, Marko, Torkkeli, Itziar Txurruka Ortega, Gustavo Vargas-Silva, Anna Young-Ferris and Chuan Yu.
... However, course instructors need to be careful with the amount of dystopian storytelling Chapter 5. Sustainable Futures of Business they apply to the class since it may leave the reader no hope of escape from the unpleasant realities (Jameson, 2005) and thus limits visioning capabilities. Besides utopian and dystopian storytelling, science-fiction-related reading assignments can help to explore and envision different futures (Bina et al., 2017;Rajaniemi & Weisman, 2019;Zaidi, 2017) or engage in worldbuilding (McDowell, 2019;Zaidi, 2019). One of these (sustainable) future narratives is called "solarpunk" (Razaghi, 2019;Reina-Rozo, 2021;Williams, 2019). ...
... The consensus achieved by the participants regarding these future actions enabled developing a scenario of what the university would look like if all these actions were implemented in upcoming years. This process of moving from a dystopic scenario to a more desirable situation is called transtopia (Zaidi, 2017). ...
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... The actions made by players convey a sense of a connected whole: players create a story in the world of the game through the actions they make (Arnaudo, 2018). Worldbuilding is the design of this imaginary world, often beginning with space and time representations, but "potentially including complete cultural studies of inhabitants, languages, mythologies, governments, politics, economies, etc." (Fullerton, 2018) Designing game worlds bears similarities with the design of imaginary worlds for other media, for example, movies, literature, or extended reality (Zaidi, 2017). As such, methods to build worlds or analyze them can be borrowed and used across media. ...
... Facing this challenge when designing our own games, we decided to build the GAS framework as a solution that we first used ourselves and then decided to share with the wider community. Since worldbuilding is an exercise undertaken in a variety of other fields (e.g., movies, literature, or mixed reality experiences), although the terminology applied to the process may differ (Zaidi, 2017), advice on worldbuilding from these related media can be adapted for game design, and we have used this approach when building GAS. As noted by Rapoport, "[…] frameworks are neither models nor theories. ...
... These users can be cross-media world designers and researchers/analysts (e.g., board games, video games, comics, film, literature, extended reality, etc.), although the wording of the framework focuses on game designers/analysts. Practitioners with a specific interest in generating worlds, or in creating meaningful play by helping the players make sense of the complex interdependencies of a changing world, can use the GAS framework as a complementary tool to any other tools that are out there on game design, for example (Raphael, Bachen, Lynn, Baldwin-Philippi, & McKee, 2010;Schell, 2019), or on worldbuilding, for example (Wrede, 2009;Zaidi, 2017). An important aspect of using the GAS framework, regardless the mode, is that, while other similar frameworks or worldbuilding processes focus mainly on separate elements of a world (Zaidi, 2017), GAS provides a method to depict the interconnections of these elements within a system. ...
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... Following the formulation of the many and much beloved acronyms 3 and theories to convey the unpredictability of the environment we live in -VUCA (Mackey, 1992), TUNA (Ramírez & Wilkinson, 2016), BANI (Cascio, 2020), Post-normal times (Sardar, 2010), etc.-we have been often times shy to move beyond the recommendation to use widely available foresight tools in response. Although promising initial attempts have been made to extract methodological insights from science fiction to the avail of foresight practice (Bina, Mateus, Pereira, & Caffa, 2017;Furr, Nel, & Ramsoy, 2018;Zaidi, 2017), futures and foresight research is yet to explain how this is to be done systematically, that is, in a manner that goes beyond the use of a limited set of science fiction artifacts and that gathers insights from larger datasets. As science fiction is used in a "case study" manner (e.g. ...
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... In organizations, these science-fiction inspired visions can play the role of powerful catalysts that consolidate and refines BMI initiatives across technical and marketing units, as well as top management. In other words, science fiction, strategic foresight, and BMI can be brought into (Zaidi, 2017). ...
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Thesis
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