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Age Classification of Slum Population

Age Classification of Slum Population

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This paper measures the incidence of malnourishment among under-five children in slums in Mumbai and compares it to the incidence in Jawhar tehsil of Thane district known for high levels of malnourishment. Severe malnourishment is found to be higher in Mumbai than in Jawhar. A connection is postulated between characteristics of urban informal labou...

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... that, we will need to know (a) percentage of urban population that lives in kutcha urban slums (b) the age-distribution of that population. Table 7 gives the age distribution of urban population calculated from our sample. ...

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... It is home to around 5000 small-scale enterprises and 15000 singleroom factories of leather, pottery, and textiles [18]. The livelihood opportunities in Mumbai attract migrants to Dharavi from different parts of India [19] and a large majority of people living in these informal settlements belong to the working-age group [20,21]. On average [8][9][10] people live in small one-room houses that are situated very close to each other in narrow lanes. ...
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... 5 Various studies have documented the poor health status of slum dwellers especially children. 6,7 A study by Shrivastava et al found that the diarrhoea and upper respiratory infection were the most common morbidities among under five year old children residing in the slums of Etawah district in Uttar Pradesh. 8 A review by Awasthi S and Agarwal S has found that diarrhoea, fever and pneumonia are the most common morbidities amongst children living in slum settlements in India and affect a considerable proportion of children living there. ...
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... This was related to the uncertain availability of casual wage employment, especially for women. 8 A review of studies on the situation of reproductive and child health in urban areas noted that there were consistent differences in antenatal care (ANC) coverage between slum and non-slum areas. While 74% of women in nonslum areas received 3 or more ANC check-ups, only 55% of the women in slums did. ...
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