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... this literature many approaches are available which discuss the characteristics employees should have in order to achieve organizational goals and advantage in the best possible way. The most influential model in this area is the so-called AMO-model ( Appelbaum et al., 2000), and it is represented in figure 1. In this model it is the right combination of abilities (A), motivation (M) and opportunities (O) of and for employees that is essential to achieve good organizational performance. ...

Citations

... This depends on applying to the analysis a theory that can usefully throw light on the HRM-WB-IOP nexus (Peccei & van de Voorde, 2019). One such, which has gained prominence in the infusion of work-psychology theory into HRM, is the job demands-resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti, et al., 2001;Schaufeli & Taris, 2014;van Veldhoven, 2012). The model is anchored in understanding how the work situation (its specific array of job demands and resources) affects employee engagement, which can (mostly) be expected to benefit both parties, and employee well-being, in which the effects may be more conflicted (Taris & Schaufeli, 2015;Ogbonnaya & Messersmith, 2019; van Veldhoven, 2012). ...
... One such, which has gained prominence in the infusion of work-psychology theory into HRM, is the job demands-resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti, et al., 2001;Schaufeli & Taris, 2014;van Veldhoven, 2012). The model is anchored in understanding how the work situation (its specific array of job demands and resources) affects employee engagement, which can (mostly) be expected to benefit both parties, and employee well-being, in which the effects may be more conflicted (Taris & Schaufeli, 2015;Ogbonnaya & Messersmith, 2019; van Veldhoven, 2012). Studies in HRM applying this model show that appropriate resources, such as good support from front-line managers and good training, can reduce employee exhaustion and, thus its negative impacts on wellbeing and retention (Cullinane et al., 2014;Huo & Boxall, 2017). ...
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Situated within a societal perspective on human resource management (HRM), this paper asks how HRM academics can make a better contribution to understanding the impacts of HRM on societal well‐being. It argues that we should target the ‘so what?’ questions that matter to society, including important issues of employer–employee misalignment and of perverse alignment (‘perverse‐performance work systems’). It calls for an approach to societal issues in HRM that is problem‐focused and theory‐informed. While recognising some validity to the criticisms of academic HRM raised in the ‘psychologisation’ debate, the article argues that the critique is over‐generalised and contests the idea that the concern of HRM academics with enhancing workplace mutuality is an expression of a unitarist ideology. Mutuality and unitarism should not be conflated. In advancing a pluralist agenda, it argues that we must become better at theoretical integration, at synergising our research methods and at engaging constructively with practitioners and policy makers.
... To understand the psychological and motivational mechanisms through which HRM (and other contextual factors) influence employee health, several researchers emphasise the importance of integrating key aspects of the demand-control model (DC) (Karasek, 1979) and, more broadly, the job demands-resources (JDR) model (Demerouti et al., 2001) into HRM literature (Parker et al., 2001;Van Veldhoven, 2012;Van De Voorde and Boxall, 2014;Albrecht et al., 2015). The central idea here is that HRM is expected to influence employees' level of task-related job resources (better job autonomy, job variety and development opportunities) (Boxall and Macky, 2009;Snape and Redman, 2010), thereby facilitating work engagement. ...
... Even though job demands and resources have been suggested as important psychological and motivational mechanisms through which HR practices (and other contextual factors, like the level of productivity) are related to employee attitudes (e.g. Van Veldhoven, 2012;Van De Voorde and Boxall, 2014;Albrecht et al., 2015), the relationship between HRM and work engagementto our knowledgehas not yet been explored empirically in the context of the JDR model. Following the JDR model, we explicitly examine two differential processes: (a) following a positive perspective, we explore how empowerment-focused HRM may positively affect work engagement via increased job resources, and (b) following a more critical perspective, we explore how empowermentfocused HRM and labour productivity may negatively affect work engagement via increased job demands. ...
... Building on key aspects of the DC model (Karasek, 1979) and, more broadly, the JDR model (Demerouti et al., 2001), the mediating role of job demands and resources in this link is investigated. The findings of this study underline the valuable contribution of incorporating the occupational health psychology literature, and the JDR model (Demerouti et al., 2001) in particular, into HRM research when aiming to understand the mechanisms between HRM activities and the work-related health of employees (Van Veldhoven, 2012;Jensen et al., 2013;Van De Voorde and Boxall, 2014;Albrecht et al., 2015). Following the dual pathways that underlie the JDR model (Demerouti et al., 2001), the current study contributes to the optimistic and critical streams in the HRM literature. ...
Article
Integrating the strategic HRM literature with key aspects of the job demands-resources (JDR) model, we propose in this study that empowerment-focused HRM and labour productivity influence work engagement of employees by shaping task-related resources and demands. A total of 311 employees nested within 46 work units of a general hospital rated their task-related resources, demands and work engagement. The line managers from these work units rated the implemented empowerment-focused HR practices in, and the relative labour productivity of, their work unit. Results indicate that job variety positively mediates the influence of empowerment-focused HRM on work engagement. In addition, job demands negatively mediate the influence of labour productivity on work engagement. The findings shed light on the way empowerment-focused HRM and labour productivity influence work engagement and highlight the importance of taking into account key aspects of the JDR model (job demands and resources for employees during work) as mediating mechanisms.
... This raises important theoretical questions because a range of explanations can be brought to bear in accounting for better or worse employment relationships (e.g. Peccei, Van De Voorde & Van Veldhoven, 2013;Van Veldhoven 2012). ...
Chapter
Theory in work psychology has significantly enhanced our understanding of how employees experience work. For example, the demand-control-support model of job strain (Karasek, 1979; Karasek and Theorell, 1990) and, more broadly, the job demands-resources model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner and Schaufeli, 2001) have spawned major streams of research that have helped us to understand the general forces that shape employee well-being and contribute to individual performance. However, although much is known about the linkages between work characteristics, well-being and performance, research in work psychology has had less to say about how the wider context affects these relationships. While scholars such as Parker, Wall and Cordery (2001) have proposed frameworks that situate work design within the organizational context, a better understanding is needed of how contextual factors affect relationships among work characteristics, well-being and performance. In reality, employees work within an environment that incorporates their organisation and the actors within it, the industry or industries in which it is located, and the society or societies in which it operates. These contextual variables are both complex and consequential. They can make a profound difference to the management of people and to their well-being. Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM) is a field of business research that focuses on how human resource management contributes to organisational performance, incorporating the effects of HRM on employee interests. The field of SHRM thus shares work psychology’s interest in employee behaviour and well-being, and can learn much from it. However, studies in SHRM also explore how patterns of HRM vary within and across organisational, occupational, industry and societal contexts, and analyse the role of HRM within the dynamics of business strategy. This is a perspective that can enrich studies in work psychology. The aim of this chapter is to explain what is meant by strategic HRM, to identify its connections with work psychology, and to explore how the two fields can assist each other. We define strategic HRM and explain its key goals in the first section. This is followed, in our second section, by a discussion of current models of the relationships between HRM, employee well-being and organisational performance. In our third section, we provide an overview of how different contexts affect HRM and have implications for employee well-being. We conclude by highlighting how strategic HRM and work psychology can draw on each other, enhancing research in both fields.
... This is where it all happens, in the end: day in, day out. All wider, distal work and personal context variables can be considered to be merely backdrops setting the stage for this ongoing exchange between the immediate work context and the individual at work (van Veldhoven, 2012;Peccei, van de Voorde & van Veldhoven, 2013). ...
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The purpose was to seek validity evidences of scales based on the model of reactions of higher education professors about the evaluation of graduate programs conducted by the Brazilian Federal Agency for Support and Evaluation of Graduate Education (Capes). The scales of satisfaction, justice perception, utility perception, and accuracy perception were applied on 814 higher education professors, being 50.36% males, with a mean age of 47.66 years (SD = 9.34). Exploratory analysis indicated the reliability of the four scales (alphas ranged from .69 to .97 and omegas are from .70). These and other psychometric indicators of the scales indicate that the measures are reliable, and the reaction model was confirmed by the strong correlation between the scales. [O objetivo deste estudo foi buscar evidências de validade de escalas elaboradas a partir do modelo de reações dos docentes de ensino superior acerca da avaliação da pós-graduação conduzida pela Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (Capes). Foram aplicadas as escalas de satisfação, percepção de justiça, percepção de utilidade e percepção de precisão a 814 docentes de ensino superior, sendo 50,36% do sexo masculino, com média de idade de 47,66 anos (DP = 9,34). As análises exploratórias indicaram confiabilidade para as quatro escalas (alfas entre 0,69 e 0,97 e ômegas a partir de 0,70). Estes e outros indicadores psicométricos das escalas apontam que as medidas são consideradas confiáveis e o modelo de reação se confirma apresentando alta correlação entre as escalas.]
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Objective: Problems in modernizing human resources of Lithuania’s service sector are discussed in the article. The objective of the article is to reveal the issues of human resources modernization, identify the trends and measures for human resources’ modernization in the service sector of Lithuania. The process of human resource management is understood as a continuous procedure where the main activities are planning, recruitment, selection, socialization, training and improvement, assessment of activity, promotion, displacement, downgrading or dismissal. The essential trends and measures for modernizing management of human resources is strategic management of human resources, growth of employee competencies and development of electronic human resources. Noteworthy to mention that in the modern world, when striving for competitive advantage, it is important to follow the guidelines of strategic management of human resources. The significance of information technologies cannot be forgotten, because the instalment of these technologies helps to coordinate innovations in science, originality and practical experience, all of which is oriented towards creation of new services and products for the society. Methodology: The research methods are based on the insights of the researchers using the analysis of scientific literature and synthesis methods. The study analyzes issues related to the modernization of human resources management in the Lithuanian service sector. Findings: Summarizing the study results, aspects of a modern organizational culture can be distinguished: promotion of friendly communication among employees (this allows solving problems in the organization among employees without the need for the employer to interrupt); constructive conflict solving with the help of a mediator; an employee who is valued in the organization becomes initiative, able to independently make decisions, is more involved in achieving goals of the organization; organizational culture is being modernized by promoting employee creativeness, or through pleasant and beneficial tasks; a manager in a modern organization is distinguished by a democratic leading style, is not a sole controller – decisions are made with the involvement of the entire team; it is modern to seek for a high level of service provision (not to be only profit-oriented). Value Added: Based on the results of the research, a way of modernizing human resource management in Lithuanian catering establishments was suggested in order to maintain high level of services provided by modern motivation methods and other elements of the organizational culture model. Recommendations: Summarizing the results of the research it is possible to distinguish aspects of modern organization culture, which showed that modernization of human resource management in Lithuanian catering establishments includes ensuring of microclimate in the organization; healthy workplace emotional and physical well-being; employee socialization; motivation of employees and encouragement to seek a high level of service in modern ways of motivation and other elements of the organizational culture model that are recommended to be emphasized in the organization.