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A tickling robot arm of the kind used for the tickling experiment by Sarah-Jayne Blakemore (Shadowrobot).  

A tickling robot arm of the kind used for the tickling experiment by Sarah-Jayne Blakemore (Shadowrobot).  

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A research project was conducted at CSL to address the issues of reflexive interactions between man and machine. Reflexive interactions allow users to create objects of interest without being an expert. Researchers of London Neuroscience institute demonstrated a tickling robot arm that can be remotely controlled by a button. Reflexive interactions...

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... particularly interesting moment was when we could literally see a child discovering and understanding the notion of "musical phrase". This was clearly indicated by a typical launching gesture, ending the phrases of the child, and very similar in shape to the spontaneous gesture performed by professional musicians (see and compare Figure 6 and Figure 12). We had collected enough information for the next five years to come (Addessi & Pachet, 2005). ...

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... This should be accompanied by a persuasive message as well, which states, for example, "This is what you would look like if you don't quit smoking." Pachet [85] explained that, in using the persuasive mirror, the long-term impact of the non-performance of the target behavior is immediately visible, and hopefully frightening enough to prompt people to begin engaging in the target behavior. Another threat-based strategy to motivate HN individuals to perform the target behavior is the threat to remove or withhold reward or social recognition. ...
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... A successful approach to real-time generation is that of implementing Markov chains with constraints for modelling musical styles (Pachet at al., 2001;Pachet, 2002). The approach was later improved with the use of combinatorial design games for creating active lexicons from knowledge models of the user's interaction (Pachet, 2008), and more recently by the use of Flow Machines for music and text (Pachet, 2016). Active lexicons are a type of grounded machine learning approach that has some similarities to the OMax system, which listens to an acoustic musician and plays along interactively by constructing real-time symbolic models in order to recombine the player's discourse into new material. ...
... A more recent theoretical investigation of meaningfulness (Surges, 2015) also considers components such as listeners' expectations and boredom, as well as machine self-evaluation mechanisms. This approach, as well as that of multidominance implemented as reflexive interactions between the user and a mirror image of themselves (Pachet, 2008) in an interactive, reflexive musical system (Ferrari & Addessi, 2014), are critical to consider in the study of computational meaningfulness. ...
... Therefore, a key element for an optimal musical experience lies in the balance between the complexity of a musical task, the user's level of expertise in the task, and their perceived engagement in the task. This assumption is rooted in studies on flow theory that specifically investigate IMSs (Pachet & Addessi, 2004;Pachet, 2008). Flow and SoC are collinear concepts (Lutz, 2009), and the first empirical application of their integration specifically aimed at IMSs (Paolizzo, 2013) is further validated in the present study. ...
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... Other approaches for motivation include social playing, such as technology that enables nonmusical parents to practice alongside their children [16]. Perhaps the most effective way is to help students remain in a flow state, where the reward of overcoming challenges within the material becomes motivation to continue playing [7,18]. ...
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