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1 A standard risk matrix 

1 A standard risk matrix 

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Risk assessment is essential to ensure safety in hospitals. However, hospitals have paid little attention to risk assessment. Several problems have already been identified in the literature about current risk assessment practice, such as inadequate risk assessment guidance and bias in risk scoring. This research aimed to improve current risk assess...

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Context 1
... instance, a risk score of 25 is not 25 times as bad as a risk score of 1 from the description of the consequence and likelihood. To illustrate this concept, Figure 4.3 shows the significance of the risk ratings between the lower right and upper left corner as being £0 to over £500,000, instead of 1 to 25. ...
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... limitations are demonstrated in Figure 4.3 by the use of the M9 risk matrix. ...
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... for p=1-10%, L:4 for p=10-50%, and L:5 for p>50% for likelihood; and C:1 for no claim, C:2 for claim less than £10,000, C:3 for claim(s)between £10,000 and £100,000, C:4 for claims between £100,000 and £1 million and C:5 for claims more than £1 million for consequence (NPSA 2008). Figure 4.3 shows that a quantitative risk rating of £10,000 can be assigned to high or extreme risk rating categories. ...
Context 4
... the risk register system data by considering the risk levels and the risk categories. The Trust used the risk matrix M4 (see Figure 4.2), which has three coloured bands. As shown in Figure 5.5, most risks were defined as clinical risks, which is not surprising since the main function in a healthcare Trust is to deliver care. ...
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... levels can be categorised as low (L), medium (M) and high (H) risks. Risk matrices are used as shown in Figure 4.1 to present the risk level as well as to support the evaluation of the risks. ...
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... risks, which are assigned to green coloured cells as in Figure 4.1, are often found to be generally tolerable. Medium risks, assigned to orange coloured cells, are generally undesirable and red ones, assigned to red coloured cells, are generally intolerable. ...
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... descriptions of the likelihood and consequence axes are used: L:1 for p<0.1%, L:2 for p=0.1-1%, L:3 for p=1-10%, L:4 for p=10-50%, and L:5 for p>50% for likelihood; and C:1 for no claim, C:2 for claim less than £10,000, C:3 for claim(s)between £10,000 and £100,000, C:4 for claims between £100,000 and £1 million and C:5 for claims more than £1 million for consequence (NPSA 2008). Figure 4.3 shows that a quantitative risk rating of £10,000 can be assigned to high or extreme risk rating categories. Furthermore, a risk score of 8, for instance, can be assigned to the quantitative risk rating of £1,000 to £5,000 (L:4 x C:2) as well as £100 to £10,000 (L:2 x C:4). These examples show that the use of risk scores as well as qualitative risk ratings categories can mislead assessors in determining the true value of the ...
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... limitations are demonstrated in Figure 4.3 by the use of the M9 risk ...
Context 9
... the risk register system data by considering the risk levels and the risk categories. The Trust used the risk matrix M4 (see Figure 4.2), which has three coloured bands. As shown in Figure 5.5, most risks were defined as clinical risks, which is not surprising since the main function in a healthcare Trust is to deliver care. In terms of the level of the risk, most of the risks were assigned to the low risk level in all risk categories, except clinical ...
Context 10
... level is estimated by multiplying the severity and likelihood ratings. Since scores are assigned to each descriptor, risk level is estimated by multiplying the severity and likelihood scores. Risk levels can be categorised as low (L), medium (M) and high (H) risks. Risk matrices are used as shown in Figure 4.1 to present the risk level as well as to support the evaluation of the ...
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... risks, which are assigned to green coloured cells as in Figure 4.1, are often found to be generally tolerable. Medium risks, assigned to orange coloured cells, are generally undesirable and red ones, assigned to red coloured cells, are generally ...
Context 12
... problems primarily relate to the replacement of risk ratings by risk scores, and to the placement of the borders of the coloured bands. for years, annually, monthly, weekly and daily) axes. However, the product of consequence and likelihood scores will bear little relationship to the underlying risk ratings. For instance, a risk score of 25 is not 25 times as bad as a risk score of 1 from the description of the consequence and likelihood. To illustrate this concept, Figure 4.3 shows the significance of the risk ratings between the lower right and upper left corner as being £0 to over £500,000, instead of 1 to 25. Thus, the use of risk scores might mislead assessors in determining the significance of a risk, especially when comparing one risk to ...

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Citations

... The investigation adopted the use of the Risk Assessment Matrix (RAM) as used in other industries (Malone and Moses, 2004). The development and use of RAM are growing in many more industries, and its usage is quite impactful (Gul and Guneric, 2016; Kaya, 2018). A questionnaire survey form is deployed online using Google form. ...
... Standard Risk Assessment Matrix(Kaya, 2018). ...
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