Fig 5 - uploaded by Martyn Ernest Obbard
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A muskrat pelt on a galvanized wire frame, showing the pelt attached to metal hooks near the base.

A muskrat pelt on a galvanized wire frame, showing the pelt attached to metal hooks near the base.

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... appearance when using a wire frame, insert a 7.5-cm nail through the nose, run the nail up over the frame, then hook it in place by inserting the tip into an eye hole; then gently work the pelt down the sides of the stretcher and fix the tail in place. When using wire frames, make a small slit in the tail and hook it over the frame's metal prongs (Fig. 5). If wooden boards are used, the tail piece should be nailed in place to give the pelt a V shape at the butt end. Each hindleg-area at the side of the board should be pinned, and a small belly wedge may be inserted for drying (Fig. ...
Context 2
... and, as the pelt is drawn through, the pressure of the rollers removes any attached fat. A properly stretched pelt will have the belly flat on one side of the frame or board and the back flat on the other. Centering of the pelt is important; the edges of the frame or board should be touching the flanks of the pelt, never the midback or midbelly (Figs. 5,6). Stretched pelts should be hung in a cool, sheltered, dry place, out of bright sunlight and away from direct heat. As the pelts dry, any grease should be wiped off with a clean cloth or paper ...