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A map of Egypt. The ancient city of Syene is today known as Aswan. Taken from www.cia.gov/ library/publications/the-worldfactbook/maps/ maptemplate_eg.html.  

A map of Egypt. The ancient city of Syene is today known as Aswan. Taken from www.cia.gov/ library/publications/the-worldfactbook/maps/ maptemplate_eg.html.  

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Around 240 B.C., Eratosthenes made what is considered to be the most famous and accurate of the ancient measurements of the circumference of the Earth.1 It was accomplished by making presumably simultaneous measurements of the angles of the shadows cast by a vertical stick at Syene (today known as Aswan) and another at Alexandria, at noon on the da...

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Citations

... El "experimento" de Eratóstenes ha sido discutido con largueza en la literatura didáctica [7,8,9,10] y no profundizaremos más en él ya que pertenece al acervo pedagógico universal. Se menciona hoy en la enseñanza de la geografía, la matemática, la astronomía y la física (a lo menos). ...
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... Since Eratosthenes' method for measuring the size of the Earth is relatively straight forward, it can be performed as a high school and university experiment without complicated or expensive equipment [2][3][4][5][6][7]. The aim of the experiment described in this paper was to reproduce Eratosthenes' measurement in two countries separated by an ocean (Australia and New Zealand) and see if a value of comparable or better accuracy can be achieved. ...
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Twenty-two hundred years ago, the Greek scientist Eratosthenes measured the circumference of the Earth. This paper describes an experiment to replicate Eratosthenes’ experiment with observers located in Australia and New Zealand. The most accurate circumference produced in the experiment described in this paper is 38 874 km, measured at Rosebud, Victoria, Australia, and Jimboomba, Queensland, Australia with an error of 2.9%. This exceeds the accuracy of Eratosthenes, although not of the modern recreation of his experiment between Syene and Alexandria. The experiment described in this paper might form a useful model for cooperation between schools in different countries.
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