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Fig 1 - Digital Holography and Cell Studies

Fig. 1. A cell culture captured using digital holographic microscopy (A) and phase contrast microscopy (B). The cells are BN7005-H1D2 mouse fibroblasts which are approximately 20 μ m in diameter. image calculation is then performed using a Fresnel approximation (Cuche et al., 1999) Varieties of the setup exist (Popescu et al., 2006; Gustafsson et al., 2004) and it is also sometimes given different names (Ikeda et al., 2005). There are also variations in the calculation of the actual recognizable image. The outcome of the reconstruction of a digital hologram is two images, one representing the amplitude of the light and one representing the phase changes of the light. The amplitude image is similar to an image of the sample captured in ordinary white light. The resolution in the direction of the incident light is very high, down to the order of nanometers (Cuche et al., 1999). By combining the phase imaging technique with physical rotation of the sample, a high resolution, label-free tomographic image can be obtained (Popescu et al., 2008). One of the advantages of DHM is that the object that is studied will always be in focus, and the image can be recalculated many times if necessary to find the best focus. Images can be captured of both single cells and populations, and the images can be presented as traditional cell images as well as 3-D representations. DHM can most likely compete with many of the other methods used today within the area of cell biology and microscopy. The technique is easy to learn and simple to use, it is cheap and gives both qualitative and quantitative results. Several research groups have used DHM for cell biology studies. 
A cell culture captured using digital holographic microscopy (A) and phase contrast microscopy (B). The cells are BN7005-H1D2 mouse fibroblasts which are approximately 20 μ m in diameter. image calculation is then performed using a Fresnel approximation (Cuche et al., 1999) Varieties of the setup exist (Popescu et al., 2006; Gustafsson et al., 2004) and it is also sometimes given different names (Ikeda et al., 2005). There are also variations in the calculation of the actual recognizable image. The outcome of the reconstruction of a digital hologram is two images, one representing the amplitude of the light and one representing the phase changes of the light. The amplitude image is similar to an image of the sample captured in ordinary white light. The resolution in the direction of the incident light is very high, down to the order of nanometers (Cuche et al., 1999). By combining the phase imaging technique with physical rotation of the sample, a high resolution, label-free tomographic image can be obtained (Popescu et al., 2008). One of the advantages of DHM is that the object that is studied will always be in focus, and the image can be recalculated many times if necessary to find the best focus. Images can be captured of both single cells and populations, and the images can be presented as traditional cell images as well as 3-D representations. DHM can most likely compete with many of the other methods used today within the area of cell biology and microscopy. The technique is easy to learn and simple to use, it is cheap and gives both qualitative and quantitative results. Several research groups have used DHM for cell biology studies. 
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