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A 200 mV, 1 kHz sine wave processed by both SPICE and state-space Rangemasters. Vcc = 9 V, fs = 176.4 kHz. 

A 200 mV, 1 kHz sine wave processed by both SPICE and state-space Rangemasters. Vcc = 9 V, fs = 176.4 kHz. 

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Iterative solvers are required for the discrete-time simulation of nonlinear behaviour in analogue distortion circuits. Unfortunately, these methods are often computationally too expensive for real-time simulation. Two methods are presented which attempt to reduce the expense of iterative solvers. This is achieved by applying information that is de...

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... component values are shown in Table 1. The state-space model was validated with SPICE, which is illustrated in Figure 5. To pro- duce this result, both simulations were initialised with steady-state solutions. ...

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