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2. Refugees Recognized in Russia under the Law "On Refugees," 1994-2002 Former Soviet Union Developing World

2. Refugees Recognized in Russia under the Law "On Refugees," 1994-2002 Former Soviet Union Developing World

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... This study has demonstrated how humanitarian initiatives are implemented across borders via universalistic models of social change, here rooted in west European models of refugee integration (Smyth, Stewart, and Da Lomba 2010). Shevel (2006Shevel ( , 2011 has argued that the UNHCR and international institutions expand opportunity structures for an inclusive refugee policy, particularly in postsocialist countries where contention over ethnicity makes room for an inclusion of a range of ethnonational groups. 16 However, this study demonstrates that North-South power dynamics can emerge even through the very institutions established to promote ethnic diversity, unwittingly exacerbating refugee exclusion in transit countries in the Global South. ...
... 16. Shevel (2006Shevel ( , 2011 argues that enduring dissent and contention over the national question provided favorable opportunities for international organizations to pressure states for wider social inclusion. "m and f" refers to male and female, two respondents with two respondents from one household. ...
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