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Coloured contour plot of density as observed by Argo floats near Ocean Station Papa (Figure 2-1). The colours indicate density (yellow is denser and blue lighter). The black lines highlight the r=1025.2 kg/m 3 (thin) and 1025.7 kg/m 3 (thick) isopycnals. Source: Ross and Robert, section 7.

Coloured contour plot of density as observed by Argo floats near Ocean Station Papa (Figure 2-1). The colours indicate density (yellow is denser and blue lighter). The black lines highlight the r=1025.2 kg/m 3 (thin) and 1025.7 kg/m 3 (thick) isopycnals. Source: Ross and Robert, section 7.

Source publication
Technical Report
Full-text available
As part of the marine protected area (MPA) network planning process in the Northern Shelf Bioregion of B.C. (NSB), the MPA technical team is reviewing 114 existing and 1 proposed marine protected areas to evaluate the degree to which each protected area meets ecological objectives for the network. • Because protected areas vary in their degree of p...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... central coast (Figure 32-1) that is about 45 km long and 3 km wide. ...
Context 2
... this regard, the availability of a long-term physical data set for Rivers Inlet provides an exceptional opportunity to examine historic changes in this ecosystem, including potential drivers of decreased salmon early marine survival, as well as place present-day inlet conditions in a long-term context. The monthly average salinity ( Figure 32-2 top-left) showed a clear seasonal, statistically significant cycle in surface and deep water. A seasonal cycle was considered statistically significant when 1951 to 2017 standard deviation was less than the average difference between months for the same time period. ...
Context 3
... monthly average temperature ( Figure 32-2 top-right) showed a statistically significant seasonal cycle in surface, near-surface and intermediate water. Deep water was variable, with no statistically significant seasonal cycle. ...
Context 4
... monthly average oxygen (Figure 32-2 bottom-left) showed a statistically significant seasonal cycle in all water types. In general, oxygen concentrations were highest in spring and lowest in September or October. ...

Citations

... Incorporating the known stressors of the relevant conservation priorities during design and monitoring can increase the efficacy of MPA networks (Mach et al. 2017). Following CSAS guidance (DFO 2019), the potential cumulative impacts of allowed activities on each species or habitat within each site are assessed and the contribution of each MPA towards meeting each ecological conservation target is scaled accordingly, in an analysis termed the conservation gaps analysis (CGA) (Martone et al. 2018;Martone et al. in prep. 5 ). ...
... 5 ). Through the CGA, species richness can be assessed at a site or network scale and can be parsed out using attributes of the proposed MPAs, such as protection level or designation type, or characteristics of the ecological features, such as functional group or conservation status (Martone et al. 2018). For example, the representation and richness of habitat classes from the Pacific Marine Ecological Classification System (PMECS; Rubidge et al. 2016) or identified EBSAs can be assessed independently. ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Canada has committed to developing effective and representative marine conservation networks. Guidance for the development of these networks focuses on core design features, including the incorporation of ecologically and biologically significant areas, ecological representation, replication, connectivity, and adequacy/viability. Network planning using these design features is currently underway in five priority bioregions: the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the Scotian Shelf, the Newfoundland-Labrador Shelves, the Western Arctic, and the Pacific Northern Shelf. To ensure these networks achieve their biodiversity protection goals and objectives, the extent to which the design features are being achieved must be evaluated and monitored over time. Practical advice on how to monitor and evaluate Marine Protected Area (MPA) networks is critical for identifying the key elements of (future) successful management plans. This paper focuses on approaches for evaluating and monitoring the core design features of the Canadian MPA Network. We describe the importance of these design features and detail tools and approaches relevant for evaluation and monitoring at the network level. We then present a detailed case study to show how marine conservation network planning in the Northern Shelf Bioregion (NSB) has incorporated the design features in evaluations of draft network designs and how those methods can direct future monitoring within the NSB and more broadly in the Canadian MPA Network.