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2: Body composition of the reference man (Snyder et al. 1975). The major components of each functional part are also given. The last columns give lean-body mass and fat-free mass definitions. 

2: Body composition of the reference man (Snyder et al. 1975). The major components of each functional part are also given. The last columns give lean-body mass and fat-free mass definitions. 

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Weight training is a type of (resistance) training to increase the strength and size of skeletal muscles primarily using bars, dumbbells and/or other equipment. Weight training has many benefits, since it can reduce the signs and symptoms of many diseases and chronic conditions. Despite all the information available today (websites, social media, m...

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... Weight training is a very common free time activity for health, increase of strength and/or muscle mass [101]. However, in extreme cases (high intensity, volume, duration and eccentric actions), exercise-induced muscle damage can result in rhabdomyolysis, a potentially serious condition that may lead to acute renal failure [102]- [104]. ...
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The Creatine Kinase (CK) is a blood marker commonly used to assess exercise induced muscle damage. However, little attention has been given for its use as an index of recovery and adaptation after weight training sessions. In this review, studies that measured the CK after single bouts of typical gym and fitness studios exercises were summarized, while eccentric actions or aerobic (endurance) studies were excluded. At a second step long term studies (>four weeks duration, or 1-2 weeks for overreaching) were used to estimate CK levels that could result in increase or decrease of performance (strength or hypertrophy). The analysis of this review showed that CK levels peaked after one to three days at mean levels of 2.5 (quads), 3.5 (whole body) or 4.5 (biceps) times the pre-exercise (base) levels. The variability though was very high and one more standard deviation brought these numbers to 5.5 times the base levels or 900 U/L. The long term studies showed that at CK levels >550 U/L (3.5 times the base levels), the performance tended to be stable or decrease. The main message of this review is that CK levels should be measured two to three days after the last training session and should be kept <550 U/L in order to avoid performance decrease and possibly to optimize improvements.