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Species-area relationships for four major European river basins. Volga: S = 42.646A -0.0129 ; Rhône: S = 8.1184A 0.1083 ; Rhine: S = 0.0368A 0.6941 ; Danube: S = 0.6458A 0.4117

Species-area relationships for four major European river basins. Volga: S = 42.646A -0.0129 ; Rhône: S = 8.1184A 0.1083 ; Rhine: S = 0.0368A 0.6941 ; Danube: S = 0.6458A 0.4117

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In the present thesis, the state and distribution of the European freshwater fish fauna was studied. For 161 river (sub-)catchments presence / absence records were retrieved from various sources. Spatial patterns of the fish fauna were analysed using GIS. Further, suggestions on how to reduce the loss of biodiversity are provided. A total of 400...

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... Finally, our results show that the levels of species richness are not concordant with levels of endemism on the Balkan Peninsula (see also Peter, 2006 for European freshwater fish fauna). It has been shown that history is among the major factors underlying the patterns of total species and endemic species richness (Heino, 2011;Griffiths et al., 2014). ...
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