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The ecodesign strategy wheel (Brezet and van Hemel, 1997)

The ecodesign strategy wheel (Brezet and van Hemel, 1997)

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The focus of this report is the implementation of the EU Directive 2005/32/EC on ecodesign requirements for energy-using products (the EuP Directive) with special attention to the ecodesign requirements for televisions (TV). The aim is to investigate the scope of the Implementing Measures (IM), how ambitious the requirements of the IM are, and to w...

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Eco-Design Strategies lead to both enhanced environmental sustainability and product differentiation, which, however, takes place only if observers recognize and value these advantages. To study this aspect, a sample of 40 product pictures has been administered to 12 subjects with experience in eco-design. They were asked to evaluate whether one or...

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... The only IM that stands out is the IM on washing machines, which also sets requirements for water consumption. According to Huulgaard and Remmen (2012) and Remmen (2010 and2011) in general only one environmental impact category and one life cycle phase is addressed in the IM, namely energy consumption in the use phase and energy efficiency. This unilateral focus is not in line with the scientific understanding of ecodesign. ...
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Purpose This paper concerns the Ecodesign Directive (2009/125/EC) and the implementing measures (IM) in which ecodesign requirements are set up for energy-using and energy-related products. Previous studies have found that the requirements have a unilateral focus on energy consumption and the use phase. This is not in line with the scientific understanding of ecodesign, where attention should be put on all life cycle phases and all relevant environmental impact categories. This study focuses on the requirements for televisions (TV). A life cycle assessment (LCA) is carried out on two TVs to analyse if other environmental hotspots and life cycle phases should be included in the requirements in the IM of the Ecodesign Directive besides energy consumption in the use phase analysis. Methods The consequential approach is used. The data for the LCA have been gathered from two manufacturers of TVs. In one case, the data were delivered in Excel spreadsheets; in the other case, the authors of this paper together with the manufacturer disassembled a TV and collected the data manually. Results and discussion When applying the consequential approach, the production phase has the highest environmental impact, which is in contradiction with the focus area of the IM. The result of the sensitivity analysis is that the source of electricity is a potentially significant contributor of uncertainty. However, even in a coal-based scenario, the contribution from the production phase is approximately 30 %. Conclusions Based on these results, it is concluded that for future requirement setting in IM, it is necessary to set up requirements that cover more life cycle phases of the product in order to address the most important impacts.
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This report constitutes the documentation of the project “Expanding the Scope of the EuP Directive”, financed by the Nordic Council of Environmental Ministers. The project was initiated by the SCP working group, chaired by Inger Grethe England, Climate and Pollution Agency, Norway. The group has for several years worked with issues related to ecodesign and resource efficiency. The project period was from 1.6 2010 to 31.12 2010. The aim of the project was to set focus on the recently recast Ecodesign Directive of the European Union (Directive 2009/125/EC), its limitations, its potentials and its future. Even though the Directive has the ambition to regulate the entire life cycle and all environmental aspects of the products in scope, implementing measures has mainly addressed the use phase and energy efficiency.