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Map of regions described in this report.

Map of regions described in this report.

Source publication
Technical Report
Full-text available
As part of the marine protected area (MPA) network planning process in the Northern Shelf Bioregion of B.C. (NSB), the MPA technical team is reviewing 114 existing and 1 proposed marine protected areas to evaluate the degree to which each protected area meets ecological objectives for the network. • Because protected areas vary in their degree of p...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... bottom trawl surveys using a small-mesh net have been conducted during May since 1973 in two regions, and since 1996 in three regions, off the west coast of Vancouver Island ( Figure 21-1). The survey masks for these regions, over which the total biomass of each species has been estimated, generally occur between the 100 m and 200 m isobaths for Areas 124 and 125. ...
Context 2
... of the species considered to be "well-sampled" by this survey are of commercial interest. Considered collectively ( Figure 21-3), biomass anomalies of many of these taxa have been largely positive since 2000. The implication is that groundfish biomass off the west coast of Vancouver Island may also have increased compared with the 1980s and 1990s, at least for these selected species in these small areas surveyed with sandy bottom types that are the preferred habitat for Smooth Pink Shrimp. ...

Citations

... Incorporating the known stressors of the relevant conservation priorities during design and monitoring can increase the efficacy of MPA networks (Mach et al. 2017). Following CSAS guidance (DFO 2019), the potential cumulative impacts of allowed activities on each species or habitat within each site are assessed and the contribution of each MPA towards meeting each ecological conservation target is scaled accordingly, in an analysis termed the conservation gaps analysis (CGA) (Martone et al. 2018;Martone et al. in prep. 5 ). ...
... 5 ). Through the CGA, species richness can be assessed at a site or network scale and can be parsed out using attributes of the proposed MPAs, such as protection level or designation type, or characteristics of the ecological features, such as functional group or conservation status (Martone et al. 2018). For example, the representation and richness of habitat classes from the Pacific Marine Ecological Classification System (PMECS; Rubidge et al. 2016) or identified EBSAs can be assessed independently. ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Canada has committed to developing effective and representative marine conservation networks. Guidance for the development of these networks focuses on core design features, including the incorporation of ecologically and biologically significant areas, ecological representation, replication, connectivity, and adequacy/viability. Network planning using these design features is currently underway in five priority bioregions: the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the Scotian Shelf, the Newfoundland-Labrador Shelves, the Western Arctic, and the Pacific Northern Shelf. To ensure these networks achieve their biodiversity protection goals and objectives, the extent to which the design features are being achieved must be evaluated and monitored over time. Practical advice on how to monitor and evaluate Marine Protected Area (MPA) networks is critical for identifying the key elements of (future) successful management plans. This paper focuses on approaches for evaluating and monitoring the core design features of the Canadian MPA Network. We describe the importance of these design features and detail tools and approaches relevant for evaluation and monitoring at the network level. We then present a detailed case study to show how marine conservation network planning in the Northern Shelf Bioregion (NSB) has incorporated the design features in evaluations of draft network designs and how those methods can direct future monitoring within the NSB and more broadly in the Canadian MPA Network.