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1 • × 1 • global map of average annual area burned (percentage of cell burned) for 1960 to 2000; data from Mouillot and Field (2005).

1 • × 1 • global map of average annual area burned (percentage of cell burned) for 1960 to 2000; data from Mouillot and Field (2005).

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Wildland fire is a global phenomenon, and a result of interactions between climate–weather, fuels and people. Our climate is changing,rapidly primarily through the release of greenhouse,gases that may,have profound,and possibly unexpected,impacts on global fire activity. The present paper reviews the current understanding,of what the future may bri...

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... Mouillot and Field (2005) estimated 608 Mha at the end of the 20th century. Approx- imately 80-86% of the global area burned occurs in grassland and savannas, primarily in Africa and Australia, but also in South Asia and South America, while the remainder occurs in forested regions of the world (Mouillot and Field 2005;van der Werf et al. 2006) (Fig. 3). In fact, the distribution and ecological properties of many of the world's biomes are affected to a large degree by their fire regime (Bond et al. 2005). From a global perspective, fires are generally absent poleward of 70 • N and 70 • S, progres- sively more frequent towards the tropics, and dropping sharply at the equator ( Mouillot ...

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... The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper. Shakesby and Doerr (2006) Earth-Science Reviews 337 Implications of changing climate for global wildland fire Flannigan et al. (2009b) International Journal of Wildland Fire 287 Emission of trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning Andreae and Merlet (2001) Global biogeochemical cycles 282 Fire effects on belowground sustainability: a review and synthesis Neary et al. (1999) Forest Ecology and Management 280 The role of fire and soil heating on water repellency in wildland environments: a review ...
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Thesis
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