• Lifeng Kang added an answer:
    Does anyone have experience with the Journal of Visualized Experiments?
    We are currently debating about subscribing to JoVE in the categories "Neuroscience" and "Behavior". Could anyone comment on the overlap of both categories or the usefulness of the individual categories or even articles? So far "Behavior" only contains 39 articles. Could it be supposed that JoVE is growing? I have seen some colleagues publishing there, but it still seems to be off the typical pursuit of impact points. Could it be supposed that JoVE will receive an Impact factor in the future?
    web: http://www.jove.com/
    Lifeng Kang · National University of Singapore

    I'm now in the process of publishing a paper with JoVE.

    Apart from the high cost, the real concern now its impact factor. It is absolutely critical for this Journal. JoVE is one of a kind and with lots of potentials. But without an impact factor it will not go very far.

  • C. Martín Saravia added an answer:
    Is it worth publishing with Lambert Academic publishers?
    My inbox has repeatedly been spammed from lambert Academic publishers. Is it worth publishing with this publisher. Do they have any authenticity. There is a lot of bad stuff written about this. Still, people publish their thesis with them. How one could publish your results in the form of book when its already published in the form of research articles. Are they peer reviewed....Suggestions welcome

    http://chrisnf.blogspot.ca/2010/06/lambert-academic-publishing-continues.html
    C. Martín Saravia · National Scientific and Technical Research Council

    http://scholarlyoa.com/2012/11/05/lambert-academic-publishing-a-must-to-avoid/

  • Amal Moustafa added an answer:
    Where can I find websites to get free scientific publications?

    Please I need links like http://gen.lib.rus.ec/ or http://www.freefullpdf.com/; I´m from Bolivia and sometimes it is too expensive buy scientific papers, usually it is not one or three, also for the students could have access without having a account where you have to be endorsed for a institution to get it (like on reserchgate). Also publications in other fields such as art, music, etc. Thank you for answers

    Amal Moustafa · Mansoura University

    www.pubmed.com

    It is very interested site for free paper & abstract of recent papers

  • Baishakhi Ghosh added an answer:
    What is the difference between Ex vivo and In vitro?
    We know the terms Ex vivo and In vitro are very close but they are not same.. non of the articles gives satisfactory information in differentiating these terms. They say Ex vivo is growing cells/tissues out side the living system..still it is not same as in vitro. What makes these systems separate from each other.
    Baishakhi Ghosh · Chest Research Foundation

    All the answer above are correct. I was just reading an article involving ex vivo and in vitro techniques (link provided). According to the published literature, I am interpret the following observation:

    ex vivo involved obtaining the macrophages directly from the subjects and staining and observing them directly. Here we are not growing the cells neither modifying them (and regarding the ex vivo gene many had already provided their opinion in the comments above).

    in vitro  involved isolating the monocytes and growing them into full fledged macrophage by providing the natural stimulation condition artificially.

    Hope this gives you a better understanding.

  • Sayed Mohammad Shafiee added an answer:
    Do I need to filter after dissolving drugs in DMSO?
    I am preparing drug stock in DMSO. To take the weight of drug I need to expose it outside the cabinet. Thus I am wondering about microbial contamination. Do I need to filter it with 0.22um syringe filter?
    Sayed Mohammad Shafiee · Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    If it is possible you can search for an alternative  solvent for the desired drug; then you can strile it through syringe filters.

  • Can I have information or links on the ecology and biology of polychaetes of the Mediterranean sea?(except FAUVEL, 1923 and 1927, Fauchald, 1977).

    I need information or interesting links on the ecology and biology of polychaetes of the Mediterranean Sea (except FAUVEL, 1923 and 1927, Fauchald, 1977). Thanks

    Chariton charles Chintiroglou · Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

    There are many paper related on symbiotic realationship with other host suth as porifera coral and ascidicea

  • Ljubomir Jacić added an answer:
    Should we question the credibility of international conferences?

    We see most of international conferences accept more than 90 percent of the papers that they receive regardless of the quality of the papers or plagiarism possibilities. Shall it make us think that the conferences are only business?

    Ljubomir Jacić · Technical College Požarevac

    Dear @Ahmad Rezaee Jordehi invited me to join the committee and to take part in the International Conference that will be held in Iran,Ayandegan University, link follows! I do just share informations. Link is in Persian!

  • Woo-Sik Jo added an answer:
    What is the liquid spawn production method of edible mushrooms?
    .
    Woo-Sik Jo · S. KOREA / www.gba.go.kr

    PDB broth of Lab, new developed medium in mass mushroom factory farm, in south Korea.

    Note : http://blog.daum.net/cordyceps/1601

    Sinecery yours

  • Ramón Aznar Roca added an answer:
    I am looking for non-destructive method for analyzing pesticide contamination in birds of prey?

    I am looking for non-destructive method for analyzing pesticide contamination in birds of prey, can we use fecal sample and pellets for analyzing pesticide contamination? 

    Ramón Aznar Roca · Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria

    Dear Prajakta,

    One year ago I published a method to detect insecticides an environmental pollutants in manure from birds. 

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264089692_Multiresidue_Analysis_of_Insecticides_and_Other_Selected_Environmental_Contaminants_in_Poultry_Manure_by_Gas_ChromatographyMass_Spectrometry

    Please don't hesitate to contact me if you need any furhter info

    Best of luck

    Ramón

  • Alok Nahata added an answer:
    What are the solvents used in TLC for plant samples?
    Please suggest me the solvents used for TLC
    Alok Nahata · Dr. Harisingh Gour University

    Because of toxicity, cost, and flammability concerns, the common solvents are hexanes (or petroleum ethers/ligroin) and ethyl acetate (an ester). Diethyl ether can be used, but it is very flammable and volatile. Alcohols (methanol, ethanol) can be used. Acetic acidcan be used, usually as a small percentage component of the system, since it is corrosive, non-volatile, very polar, and has irritating vapors. Acetone can be used. Methylene chloride or and chloroform (halogenated hydrocarbons) are good solvents, but are toxic and should be avoided whenever possible. If two solvents are equal in performance and toxicity, the more volatile solvent is preferred in chromatography because it will be easier to remove from the desired compound after isolation from a column chromatography procedure.

    Usually we mix a non-polar solvent (hexanes) with a polar solvent (ethyl acetate or acetone) in varying percent combinations to make solvent systems of greater and lesser polarity.

  • Michael Patriksson added an answer:
    Where can I find useful literature on graph theoretical applications to biological networks?

    Please provide me information regarding the recent developments in the mathematical, especially graph theoretical, studies on biological networks. Please give some good reference too..

    Thanking you in advance,

    Sudev

    Michael Patriksson · Chalmers University of Technology

    Perhaps this: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/239328836_A_Graph_Theory_Approach_to_Demographic_Loop_Analysis

    And then there is the theory of branching processes to investigate growth and extinction of species. Here is a classic book: 

    http://www.cambridge.org/ca/academic/subjects/life-sciences/evolutionary-biology/branching-processes-variation-growth-and-extinction-populations#contentsTabAnchor

    And this, from Nature: 

    http://www.nature.com/nrg/journal/v4/n7/glossary/nrg1112.html

    And I am sure there is more! :-)

  • Mouri Ghosh added an answer:
    Can anyone suggest materials for a literature

    Prefer recent journal articles, and textbooks as well as current methods in their assays. All materials are welcomed.

    Mouri Ghosh · Hooghly Womens College, India

    You could try “Genotoxicity Assessment Methods and Protocols” by Alok Dhawan and Mahima Bajpayee, published by Springer Ptotocols. Its freely accessible in the net (about 8.2 Mb). It helped me . Another book is "Invitro toxicity testing protocols" edited by Sheila O'Here and Chris K. Atterwill, vol 43, under "Methods on Molecular Biology" also freely downloadable,  but I haven't really read that one (actually i have only read the headings of that one). Good luck staying awake, hurting your eyes, and loading your brain with loads of toxicity :-)

  • Ruckmani Kandasamy added an answer:
    Is there anybody interested in partnership within Erasmus+ KA1 & KA2 with Ukrainian university?

    In biology, ecology. Directions: botany, zoology, entomology, biodiversity, protected areas

    We are looking for associations with like you for jointprojects.

  • Billy Almarinez added an answer:
    Can mosquitoes larvae causes myiasis? If yes, which larvae?

    Usually, reports of myiasis is associated to flies. Because of resemblance in biology of fly and mosquito it seems the later could do it too.

    Billy Almarinez · De La Salle University

    You are welcome, Sir Mansour. If you are asking for links to the reports on cases of myiasis being caused by larvae of Psychoda spp., you may easily search for publications here in ResearchGate with the keywords "Psychoda" and "myiasis". You can likewise search Google for links to articles or at least abstracts of the publications using the same keywords.

  • András Bozsik added an answer:
    Which language can be an ideal or optimal lingua franca for science?
    To use a language as a scientific lingua franca can give advantages and disadvantages for the members of the scientific community on the basis of their culture and mother tongue. The status of a scientific or international language developed historically and not according to logical ideas and decisions on equal opportunity. I have tried to classify former scientific languages and some present candidates. I - as a European with my own experiences and preconceptions - have found Italian and German languages as the best fits. I am waiting for your opinion and reasons.

    Characteristics of the ideal international scientific language

    Grammar: easy
    Vocabulary: well known
    Script: easy
    Pronunciation: easy
    Giving equal opportunity: perfect = dead language
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: yes
    Strong economic/political background: none (= economy and politics do not influence the choice)

    Characteristics of historical international scientific languages and candidates

    Greek

    Grammar: not easy
    Vocabulary: well known
    Script: not easy
    Pronunciation: not easy
    Giving equal opportunity? yes, one mother country
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: historically yes
    Strong economic/political background: none

    Latin

    Grammar: difficult
    Vocabulary: well known
    Script: easy
    Pronunciation: relatively easy
    Giving equal opportunity? perfect
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: historically yes
    Strong economic/political background: none

    Arabic

    Grammar: very difficult
    Vocabulary: very difficult
    Script: very difficult
    Pronunciation: very difficult
    Giving equal opportunity? too many native speakers
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: historically yes
    Strong economic/political background: too many countries


    Chinese

    Grammar: I do not know
    Vocabulary: very difficult (for Europeans at least)
    Script: very difficult
    Pronunciation: very difficult
    Giving equal opportunity? too many native speakers
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: yes
    Strong economic/political background: world power

    English

    Grammar: at the beginning easy, then difficult
    Vocabulary: well known
    Script: OK
    Pronunciation: difficult
    Giving equal opportunity? too many native speakers
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: yes
    Strong economic/political background: world power

    French

    Grammar: difficult
    Vocabulary: well known
    Script: OK
    Pronunciation: difficult
    Giving equal opportunity? one mother country
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: yes
    Strong economic/political background: none

    German

    Grammar: relatively easy
    Vocabulary: well known
    Script: easy
    Pronunciation: easy
    Giving equal opportunity? two mother countries (Switzerland has four official languages)
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: yes
    Strong economic/political background: none

    Russian

    Grammar: difficult
    Vocabulary: not so easy
    Script: easy
    Pronunciation: easy
    Giving equal opportunity? too many native speakers
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: yes
    Strong economic/political background: world power

    Italian

    Grammar: easy
    Vocabulary: well known
    Script: easy
    Pronunciation: easy
    Giving equal opportunity? one country
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: yes
    Strong economic/political background: none

    Spanish

    Grammar: not so easy
    Vocabulary: well known
    Script: easy
    Pronunciation: not so easy
    Giving equal opportunity? too many native speakers
    Strong cultural background: yes
    Strong scientific background: yes
    Strong economic/political background: too many countries
    András Bozsik · University of Debrecen

    Dear Kennedy,

    The question was to evaluate which language suits best general scientific communication. Please, find a determined opinion.

  • Abdou abd alltif added an answer:
    How to determine ascorbic acid in any plant sample using Spectrophotometer?
    I need detailed protocol to determine ascorbic acid in plants, I will make analysis with UV-Spectrophotometer.
    Abdou abd alltif · Cairo University

    This method cited from (Sakr et al., 2012)

    Ascorbic acid extracted from 2 g shoot fresh material by 4% oxalic acid, then made up to 100 mL and centrifuge at 2,000 rpm for 5 min, then add 10 mL of 4% oxalic acid and titrate with 2,6-dichlorphenol-indophenol as described by Sadasivam and Manickam (1996)

    Sadasivam S, Manickam A (1996) Biochemical methods, 2nd edn.
    New Age International (P)Ltd., Publishers, New Delhi, ISBN
    81-224-0976-8

  • Felipe Kupske added an answer:
    GLMM tutorial in SPSS?
    We are trying to find some tutorial, guide, or video explaining how to use and run Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) in SPSS software. We are working in animal behavior (primatology) and we need to analyze a 8 years' longitudinal database about the re-socialization and rehabilitation process of a chimpanzee sample.

    Do you know where to get it? Some advice?
    Felipe Kupske · Universidade Comunitária da Região de Chapecó

    http://www-01.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/SSLVMB_20.0.0/com.ibm.spss.statistics.help/glmm_howto.htm?cp=SSLVMB_20.0.0 

  • Daniel Baldomir added an answer:
    What is the biggest scientific coincidence that you know?
    For me the two more important are:

    1. The phase transition liquid-solid for the water is that the solid state is less dense.
    2. The dielectric screening in metals is such that the Coulomb interaction among the electrons falls at a distance of the Bohr radius.

    The first one has many important applications as the one of allowing the live in rivers during winter or so on. On the other hand, there are also very interesting electric and thermodynamic phase transitions for this material

    The second, thanks to have a so local electric interaction it allows to have almost free electrons at quite high electronic density in matter and therefore to apply theories so useful as the bands in solids. Over all in metals
    Daniel Baldomir · University of Santiago de Compostela

       Dear Robin,

       I have only reading the abstract of the paper, could I have the rest of the paper? Thank you

  • De Hollenberg added an answer:
    Robotics, Genetics and AI with a touch of Philosophical prediction?
    Would it be reasonable to think that combining Molecular Genetics and Cognitive Robotics will some day (ex. in 10, 50, 100 yrs.) contribute to a successful convergence between man and machine to combat disease and degeneration of humans?
    Many science writers seem to say the merger in not too far away now. Should we believe them?

    Yes, that synchrony is often referred to as "self-organized behavior." Perhaps the best science begins with close observation while focusing in a condition of childlike naivete and not the 'rear-view mirror' perspective taken while in an accommodating armchair soaking up the airy notions of the most reputable thinkers in the grandest library..

    For example, one might gain insight by immersing oneself in a pristine natural environment and simply observe events as they unfold across the many length scales, from the tiniest to those occurring across the entire landscape. Then compare your observations with the functioning of the complex technology of your choice.

  • Tang Fei added an answer:
    Do you agree that an Expert System can replace the human in different expert areas?
    An Expert System is a special kind of software and they are working on knowledge base. They are specifically designed for an special purpose. They have logical ability like human and much more faster than human.
    Tang Fei · Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.

    The robot's advantages: speed, range, without loss of memory

    Human advantages: tricks, does not conform to the rules, to obtain the final victory

  • Marco Aurélio M Freire added an answer:
    Does anyone know a link/page where the 2013 Journal Impact factors (in Biology) are listed out comprehensively?
    I am unable to access it from Thomson Reuters directly and many journals do not display it on their homepages.
    Marco Aurélio M Freire · Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute of Neuroscience of Natal

    Taking a look in JCR, it seems odd that Frontiers in Neuroscience still remains out of there.

  • Bryan Wang Lin added an answer:
    How can iPad or other tablets be used as record-keeping and productivity tools in the lab?
    How are you using iPads or other tablets in your lab, and what are some of the most useful apps for you? Have you integrated tablets into an electronic notebook system, and, if so, which one? Finally, if you had to make the choice today, iPad, iPad Mini, or something else?
    Bryan Wang Lin · Stanford Medicine

    You might want to try out Vessel. It's a research management web app and mobile app that helps researchers track, organize, and share their data. It allows scientists to make observations, take pictures, and make any protocol changes on any mobile device. First 3 users are free per lab and any additional members will have a 60 day free trial.

    For more info, check out:

    https://app.vesselsci.com/

  • Len Troncale added an answer:
    Is there any known reports for a motif alone, which can act as a functional unit?

    As far my knowledge motif can be an integral part of domain but it is not possible vice-versa.In one of our recent discussion I got this curious thought to know that Is there any known reports for a motif alone, which can act as a functional unit? If so Is it acceptable to call that single functional motif as a domain?. Thank you for your thoughtful inputs.

    Len Troncale · California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

    Ruth and John provide definitive observations. But it occurred to me on reading them that one of the outstanding features (functions?) of the eucaryotic genome is the ability to experience sequence duplications and crossovers, both of which are usually larger than the typical small sequence of a motif, but would allow for usage of established motif's in new protein domains. If you chose to label that as a "function" then, yes, motifs would have that additional function. Still, they are most often embedded in a larger domain on which they depend for folding stability (or sometimes they themselves add more stability to the more "global" folding) so it would be hard to qualify them as independent functional units given so much dependency, except on that epigenetic level just suggested. To further confuse the situation, we in molecular genetics must recognize that currently in complexity systems science the word "motif" has a very specific meeting within a network structure. To wit, the answers here presume the subdiscipline of molecular genetics not network theory. However, isomorphically the reasoning for the molecular answers also seem spot on for the network instantiation.

  • Cameron Barnes added an answer:
    What are the measures used in different countries to stimulate publication activity?
    The main problem of Post-Soviet science is connected with its weak "visibility" that leads to its weak global competitiveness. Very weak growth rates of publication activities of the Post-Soviet countries are noted. In these countries, publication activities of scientists in the journals that are included into the Web of Science and SCOPUS databases are by no means stimulated.
    On the SCIMAGO platform, by means of the operator «Compare», I generated graphics on dynamics of publications by Russian and Ukrainian scientists in comparison with the total publication activity in Iran and Turkey (graph).
    It is well known that Iran and Turkey implemented stimulating measures aimed at supporting the publication activities of their scientists many years ago. About ten years ago in Turkey a reward of $100 to $300 US dollars was offered for one SCI- publication, depending on the impact factor of the journal. In Iran for one such publication, a reward ranging from 300 to 500 Euros is currently offered by the State University. Besides, they have government grants for the support of such publication activities (up to 20,000 Euros for approximately ten publications). This explains the reason why in 2012 Iran bypasses Russia in total publication activities (graph).
    I’m interested in the examples of stimulating measures that are being granted by different countries in the form of publication micro-grants. Generalization of these measures would allow to adapt them for the conditions of Post Soviet countries, where in many fields of knowledge their is absence of publication practice of results of researches in internationally recognized journals.
    Cameron Barnes · University of New England (Australia)

    Instiutional-level cash bonus schemes for publishing in approved journals appear to be far more common than is often realised.

    The practice is not confined to the Third World, but documented for individual institutions in European countries such as Austria, Denmark, France,  Italy, Netherlands, and Norway. It is also found in elsewhere, in countries as diverse as the United States, Australia, South Korea, Egypt, Israel and the Philippines.  I have been attempting to assemble information about such institutional policies for a year or two, but it is extremely difficult to get a coherent picture.

    I suspect that it will be almost impossible to demonstrate the effectiveness of institutional schemes as they rarely occur in a vacuum.  The same factor applies to national-level schemes. They seem effective enough (within narrow parameters), but correlation does not prove causation.  Countriesoften bring in such reward programs as part of a wider policy package. When such schemes are cut, the context may be a general reduction in funding for higher education.

    Good luck with your research. 

  • Partha Pratim Dhar added an answer:
    What are the differences between germplasm, accession, genotype, and population and also between heirloom and landrace?

    Are these words different in terminologies of plants and animals sciences?

    Partha Pratim Dhar · King Saud University

    Dr. Sidhu, Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. Bhuwan explained well. I fully agree with their interpretations.

  • Vikrant Sahu asked a question:
    What is basic meaning of additive and dominance effect of qtl.?is this effective or useful in f5 population?

    none

  • Uriel Barboza Perez added an answer:
    Can you give me some information about synthetic biology?
    I'm looking for someone who works with synthetic biology to get information about it.
    Uriel Barboza Perez · Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey

    ha ran into your question again... i see you are from sinaloa.. dont know anybody from there that works with synbio but in cinvestav irapuato you can contact agustino  http://www.ira.cinvestav.mx/Investigaci%C3%B3n/DepartamentodeIngenier%C3%ADaGen%C3%A9tica/ProfesoresInvestigadores/DrMart%C3%ADnezAntonioAgustino/tabid/112/language/es-MX/Default.aspx :)  jajaa saludos!

Topic Followers (243515) See all