Periodontics and Oral Pathology

Periodontics and Oral Pathology

  • Rangeeth Bollam Nammalwar added an answer:
    Will diode laser therapy be an effective replacement for periapical surgery in cases of periapical abscess with sinus tract?
    I have been using 910nm diode laser for treating the rct failure cases with periapical abscess forming a sinus tract into the sulcus, and I am seeing a very good prognosis.
    Rangeeth Bollam Nammalwar · Dr. M.G.R. University

    use of diode laser with sodium hypochloride irrigation seems to work well. The fiber should also reach the apical foramen.

  • Caroline Mohamed added an answer:
    In case of apical swelling (with pus): How many day(s) should we keep open the canal to discharge the pus?
    Recently, I have observed in my clinical practice a re-swelling of infected canal after antiseptic dressing. Sometime the tooth become mobile and extruded. Please suggest the possible solution.
    Caroline Mohamed · Libyan International Medical University

    Who told you that science can not be fun?

  • Sunethra Rajapakse added an answer:
    What is the consensus on fluoridated toothpaste for patients with endemic fluorosis?
    Endemic fluorosis
    Sunethra Rajapakse · University of Peradeniya

    thanks Prof Gail for the answer and the reference.

    regards,

    Sunethra

  • Andy Edwards asked a question:
    Does anyone have a paper demonstrating differing tollerances of periodontal and gingival fibroblasts to calcium ions?
    I have noticed gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts have differing morphologies when cultured with MTA.
  • Amit Agrawal added an answer:
    Does it make sense to use the Platelet-derived in dentistry today?
    I'm writing a review and I just want to test the opinion of the network.
    Amit Agrawal · Mahatma Gandhi Vidyamandir
    When we are talking about PRP, one important thing to consider is that how much RICH the plasma should be? Say at least 3 times and original platelet concentrate in the blood. But how many of the articles have actually counted pre and post platelet conc. and then supported the results they got.
    In a small in-vitro study done few years back at GDC Nagpur, India. Out of 10 samples of PRP, only 2 had more platelets in PRP, 3 had equal amount, and 5 samples actually had lesser concentration of platelet than the patients blood levels. Unbelievable right? This occurs because the procedure of obtaining PRP is followed differently at every setup, the technique is skill demanding and at the end rought handling of platelets can damage them reducing the actual potential of PRP.

    PRF, comparatively is much easier to obtain. But can any body tell me how to count platelet conc. in PRF?
  • Chiara Baroni added an answer:
    Why is diode laser irradiation used in intervals with multiple doses of laser?
    In a number of articles, diode laser is used along with scaling and root planing in moderate periodontitis cases. After the first diode laser application, it is used in intervals- on the 4th,7th,9th and 11th day (a total of 4 or 5 applications of diode laser in Periodontal pockets). Is there any standard criteria for using diode laser in intervals with multiple doses of laser?
    Chiara Baroni · University of Bologna
    Does any of you have experience in diode laser remineralisation of hypomineralised enamel?May be using fluoride as an intermediate?How many applications would you suggest?
  • Steven E Eckert added an answer:
    Is there any scientific evidence on the success of Laser-assisted new attachment procedure (the LANAP protocol) in periodontal surgical therapy?
    .
    Steven E Eckert · Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
    The American dental Association has provided a statement on the use of lasers and dentistry. If you go to ADA.org and then search this topic you will find a pretty well thought out response.

    Here is the section related to the LANAP protocol:
    Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure

    A 2007 publication compared the probing depth, attachment gain, and type of attachment from traditional mechanical therapy of advanced chronic periodontitis vs. traditional mechanical therapy that included two intrasulcular applications of Nd: YAG; one aimed at removing the sulcular epithelium and another said to “seal” the pocket.2 In this study, histology was performed on 6 pairs of single-rooted teeth at 3 months. Laser-treated pockets tended to show greater probing depth reductions and clinical attachment gains than non-lased pockets. Based on measurements from notches placed in periodontally involved root surfaces before treatment, lased teeth showed evidence of new cementum while 5 of the 6 control teeth showed a long junctional epithelial attachment. This study concluded that the Laser Assisted New Attachment ProcedureTM (LANAP) can be associated with cementum-mediated new connective-tissue attachment and apparent periodontal regeneration of diseased root surfaces in humans.

    Although the Council is optimistic regarding the potential for lasers to enhance effectiveness in treating periodontitis, dentists should note that this study provides no more than pilot validation for this treatment concept. The study was not blinded, and the sample size was small thereby limiting extrapolation of the results to the general population. Further, pre-treatment notches in the teeth were difficult to place, hard to know exactly where they were placed and are difficult to clearly detect on histological specimens. Moreover, the advanced periodontal destruction initially present in these 6 test teeth make it difficult to extrapolate these results to cases of early and moderate chronic periodontitis, where the anatomic environment, laser energy distribution and clinical outcome may differ substantially. It is also unclear what laser-based “sealing” of a treated periodontal sulcus is and, if real, what benefits it might provide. Additional clinical data from properly designed clinical trials with adequate sample sizes are still required before it can be known to what extent LANAP is safe and effective across the spectrum of patients with chronic periodontitis. The Council therefore cautions clinicians to weigh the available evidence for LANAP when considering the options available for treatment of the periodontal diseases.

    So my interpretation, using this statement from the American dental Association is that this procedure may have some potential but there is certainly no definitive hard scientific evidence to show that it is anything more than another way to address a problem.
  • Amit Agrawal added an answer:
    Does anyone have information on drug induced gingival overgrowth in antihypertensive therapy?
    Identification of this problem as early as possible is very important in management. How do I do it?
    There are many new antihypertensive drugs being used. Some of these might have a similar effect? Are there any research papers?
    Amit Agrawal · Mahatma Gandhi Vidyamandir
    Nifidipine, Amlodipine, Cyclosporine all are known to lead gingival overgrowth. But suppose a patient is taking all three drugs simultaneously, then how to proceed.
  • Ting Yu added an answer:
    Has anyone had experience in staining macrophage in periodontal tissue in mice?
    Does anyone have some experience in staining macrophage in periodontal tissue, especially in periodontally-infected (i.e., periodontitis) tissue in mice? Growing attention is paying on macrophage in periodontitis. However, it seems too few macrophages exist in periodontitis, let alone in the tiny gingiva in mice. If I hope to immunostain macrophages in paraffin-embedding jaw from mice, what are the notes during decalcification, tissue processing and immunohistochemistry?
    Ting Yu · Southern Medical University
    Dear Antonius Bronckers, Thank you for your so kind advice in detail ! I'm itching to try the classical TRAP staining method in periodontal tissue. Could you give me a TRAP protocol for parraffin-embedding jaw from mice, since very few articles have descripted this condition in detail? Your suggestions on distinguishing macrophage from osteoclast in periodontal tissue is noticeable and very useful. But I wonder if the TRAP kit will stain any cells other than macrophage and osteoclast, e.g., if any, mast cell or plasma cell? As you said, osteoclast is multicleated (>3 nuleus could be seen as a threshold ) which might be excluded to count macrophage in periodontal tissue? Strictly speaking, there are no specific but more representative markers for macrophage, such as F4/80 and CD68, with which I would try. According to your experience, how many macrophages-like cells could be stained in subepithelial connective tissue?
  • Thejokrishna Pammi added an answer:
    Where can I get paraffin chewing gum?
    This is used to stimulate saliva secretion.
    Thejokrishna Pammi · Terna Dental college, nerul,Navimumbai
    i have use one from Gci Asia [ one that manufactures Fuji IX GP ] in their salivary test kit.
    You can also by in bulk pure paraffin wax , we get in tin and use sharp ice scoops also to make thin waffers. This is workable solution in case above is not available
  • Rajesh Hosdurga added an answer:
    What are the guidelines to assess acute toxicity of in-situ oral gel?
    I am using 2% curcumin gel to treat experimental periodontitis. I wanted to assess the acute toxicity and chronic toxicity of this gel used to apply subgingivally in rat model. Please let me know the answer.
    Rajesh Hosdurga · Yenepoya University
    Thank you Mr. Gulam Husain. I am doing the study following OECD guidelines now.
  • Rajesh Hosdurga added an answer:
    How to develop a sustained drug delivery system for curcumin in the treatment of experimental periodontitis?
    I am working on the effect of topical curcumin on ligature induced periodontitis in wistar albino rats. We have used a gel base which delivers curcumin for 24-48 hours. We confirmed the duration of activity using paw edema method, but the drug release rate is only 60% when the gel is applied and inflammation is induced using 0.1% carrageenan. We have treated 1 group with the same gel.
    Rajesh Hosdurga · Yenepoya University
    Thanks Rajvir. But I am looking to use it as local drug delivery system to treat periodontitis
  • Nathan Alexander Moreau added an answer:
    What is the frequency we have malignant degeneration in odontogenic Cysts? How to do the right diagnosis?
    Odontogenic Cysts/Cancer
    Nathan Alexander Moreau · Hôpital Bretonneau – Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Nord Val de Seine
    According to recent scientific literature, it seems that the occurence of a primary intra-osseous squamous cell carcinoma arising from degenerated odontogenic cysts is around 0.3 to 3% of cases. (Jain et al. 2013)
    This malignant degeneration seems to occur more frequently in large old cysts, which have gone untreated for several years.
    It seems that the only way to ensure proper diagnosis is through systematic histopathological analysis of "suspect" cysts. On that matter, follow up is paramount.
  • Blake Jane added an answer:
    Periodontally accelerated orthodontic and osteogenic techniques - what is your experience?
    As invasive as it is, this technique, with its variants, seems interesting and promising. I would much appreciate learning from your critical opinions and experience.

    I attach one article and list here others, equally easily available on the net.

    Periodontal Accelerated Osteogenic
    Orthodontics: A Description of the
    Surgical Technique
    Kevin G. Murphy, DDS, MS,* M. Thomas Wilcko, DMD,†
    William M. Wilcko, DMD, MS,‡ and
    Donald J. Ferguson, DMD, MSD§

    An Evidence-Based Analysis of Periodontally
    Accelerated Orthodontic and Osteogenic
    Techniques: A Synthesis of Scientific
    Perspectives
    M. Thomas Wilcko, William M. Wilcko, and Nabil F. Bissada

    PERIODONTALLY ACCELERATED OSTEOGENIC ORTHODONTICS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
    Yener ÖZAT1 Ruhi NALÇACI2

    One-stage Surgical Alveolar Augmentation (PAOO)
    For Rapid Orthodontic Movement. A Case Report.
    1 Ashish Jain, M.D.S
    2 Tarun Das, M.D.S
    3 Rashi Chaturvedi, M.D.S, D.N.B

    Piezocision Assisted Orthodontics: A new approach to
    accelerated orthodontic tooth movement
    Mittal S.K. 1, Sharma R.2, Singla A.3
    Blake Jane · Sapienza University of Rome
    Thank you again, dr. Major. It is indeed a misterious field, very challenging, in which the future may bring interesting news.
    I have to be correct, I am only a dentistry student. Doctorship pending... :)
  • Abdalla El-Mowafy added an answer:
    The use of ozonated oils in endodontics and periodontology - what is your experience and opinion?
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/255177879_Comparison_of_the_antibacterial_activity_of_an_ozonated_oil_with_chlorhexidine_digluconate_and_povidone-iodine._A_disk_diffusion_test?accountKey=Luigi_Checchi&ch=reg&cp=re215_x_p8&pli=1&loginT=Bgvwu3XvYNN81d3GdVY1GZFJFFodrdKPvEU-RQCDAl76uAVytT6Dh-Gj0XhKY4TZ
  • Aaro Turunen added an answer:
    Which is the most common benign tumor of the oral cavity?
    Between fibroma, lipoma, hemangioma, and lymphangioma.
    Aaro Turunen · University of Turku
    Out of those 4 I agree with the fibroma being most common, however I also agree with Dr. Subramanyam - it arises as a reactive hyperplasia and actually if we want to be slightly cheeky, I´d say lipoma is the most common actual tumor from those four presented by Dr. Mohammed because there are many misdiagnosed vascular malformations labeled as "hemangioma" that are not actual monoclonal tumours :)

    Dr Gianninis answer is also excellent: in order to diagnose disorders of certain parts of the body we must know what cells are present there - I was told a few weeks ago that upon showing a clinical and a histopathologic picture of an oral dysplasia to a student and asking what can be seen there, the student answered that there is cartilage present in the sample. Now, if this had been true from an oral sample it would almost certainly indicate a sarcoma of some sort since cartilage should not be found in the oral cavity at all and it would need to have come from somewhere else!
  • Balsam Fathi added an answer:
    What are the in vivo uses of Lawsonia inermis?
    Is it safe to be ingested? And how can I get rid of the stain? Is Lawsonia inermis toxic and should not be used in vivo? And can I separate the stain from the component that cause therapeutic effects?
    Balsam Fathi · specialist health center
    Thank you sir, i ve read a very old article belongs to 1960 , the author used the herb for the treatment of amoebiasis and diarrhea, the volunteers consumed the leaves water extract (intra oral) , my question is ... Is it safe to be ingested ? and if it is not at what dose it becomes toxic?
  • George Michelinakis added an answer:
    Can anyone give me insight on the risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw in dental implant patients taking oral bisphosphonates?
    I’m aware that a higher risk is observed in patients receiving bisphosphonates by IV (Gen Dent. 2010 Nov-Dec;58(6):484-92), but am curious to know specifically if recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between oral bisphosphonates, implants and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Is there a risk/relationship? And should implant patients taking oral BPs be informed of this possible additional risk?
    George Michelinakis · Private Dental Practice
    Hi.
    There is ongoing research on the issue of implant placement in patients receiving bisphosphonate treatment. The current data is rather weak, short-termed and further well-designed studies need to be conducted.
    Nevertheless, as mentioned above, for patients taking the IV form, implant placement should be avoided.
    For patients taking oral bisphosphonates, there seems to be a 3 year continuous treatment threshold beyond which, implant placement is not contra-indicated but should be performed under strict aseptic conditions, minimal trauma to the bone, suturing and two-stage procedure and antibiotic cover. CTX testing is not conclusive according to present data. For patients receiving oral bisphosphonates for less than 3 years, implant placement should be carried out as normal.
    Hope it helped.
  • Neil Schembri added an answer:
    How can an orthodontic patient with one hand other hand has been amputated) do dental flossing herself?
    First solution is parental help but she wants to do it independently.
    Neil Schembri · University of Bristol
    mini flossers by Tepe
    http://www.tepekids.com/fileadmin/uploads/tepekids/Products/tepe_floss_green.JPG
  • Wolfgang H. Muss added an answer:
    What are the proper classifications for periodontal desease?
    Is the Armitage paper from I think 1999 the concensus?
    Wolfgang H. Muss · Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg
    Dear Kerstin, dear posters, I know the thread of this question is relatively old now, but as I got today an issue of the Magazine of the German Research Society (DFG, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), No 1 of 2013, I would like to post a perhaps interesting article from there (pp. 24-27).
    Best wishes and regards
  • Yango Pohl added an answer:
    14 years old with R.R. upper left lateral, non-vital, oozing pus from R.C. Extraction or endo ttt with apicectomy & retro-grade filling?
    What do you think the prognosis will be in case of endo ttt with custom made post & crown later (note the age of the patient)?
    Yango Pohl · University of Bonn
    Dear Dr Steier,
    yes, you are right with your questions, however, it is sad that these questions are that important...
    The look into the past should alert us, should force us to reconsider what we are doing, it should not be an excuse for doing nothing, for just accepting what our ancestors developed or used. Maybe they were right, but maybe they were wrong. Thus, as scientists, it is our duty to re-evaluate, to check, to compare also well established treatments. We never should be contented, but also not disappointed.
  • Virendra Suryavanshi added an answer:
    What is the relationship between tooth decay and heart disease?
    What can make failure in heart disease treatment with a patient presenting tooth decay and periodontal disease?
    Virendra Suryavanshi · Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi
    Sir i wanna research for any mining engineering topic and any guys suggest any intresting topic for me.
  • Dirk W Lachenmeier added an answer:
    How much do we as dental practitioners and researchers, recommend our patients to use an alcohol-based mouthwash on a regular basis.
    Discussion is welcome keeping in mind the pros and cons of these mouthwashes. If we recommend it, do we monitor the patient compliance regarding its usage.
    Dirk W Lachenmeier · Chemisches und Veterinäruntersuchungsamt Karlsruhe
    Please refer to our letter to the editor with detailed criticism about the Gandini et al. paper: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/231609881_Alcohol-containing_mouthwash_and_oral_cancer_-_can_epidemiology_prove_the_absence_of_risk?ev=srch_pub
  • Hayfaa Hashim Farah added an answer:
    Has anyone examined children with Treacher Collins Syndrome?
    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), also known as Treacher Collins–Franceschetti syndrome, or mandibulofacial dysostosis is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder characterized by craniofacial deformities, such as absent cheekbones. Treacher Collins syndrome is found in about 1 in 50,000 births. The typical physical features include downward slanting eyes, micrognathia (a small lower jaw), conductive hearing loss, underdeveloped zygoma, drooping part of the lateral lower eyelids, and malformed or absent ears.
    Hayfaa Hashim Farah · University of Khartoum
    Not at all, u r welcome.
  • Lucina Koyio added an answer:
    Where can I find articles on barriers to behavioural change?
    I am examining the differences in oral hygiene behaviours between compliant and non compliant periodontal patients.
    Lucina Koyio · Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation, Kenya
    You may have a look at my article Koyio - Journal of Public Health Research
  • Martin - Levine added an answer:
    What does 'C' stand for in C-reactive Protein?
    It is related to some C-substance but still what does C stand for is not yet clear.
    Martin - Levine · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
    Amit,
    Thank you for posting your kind comment.
    Martin
  • Wolfgang H. Muss added an answer:
    Rhodamine dye preparation
    Can anyone advise on how to prepare 0.01mm of rhodamine dye from the powder form of the dye? What method of preparation do you use? What is the water:powder ratio?
    Wolfgang H. Muss · Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg
    Dear Adit Bharat Mehta,
    don't know whether there you got an answer to your question or not.
    This your question should have been presented in Topic STAINING rather than this one (Periodontics and Oral Pathology), I guess.
    Just to be short here: the requested water:powder ratio will depend on the mol-weight of the dye you use.... so you should at least define here (to the forum) which dye you intend(ed>) to use ;-): There are several forms of the dye (and therefore also different Mol-weights = g/mol) e.g. Rhodamine B (MW 442, water solubility: 2%; 1,8% in ethanol), Rhodamine 6G (MW= g/mol 479.02, water solubility: 20 g/l (25 °C) ), Sigma-Rhodamine 123 (MW 380.82, water solubility: at least 0.1 % (25 °C)), NHS-Rhodamine (W: 528)…(sources: Techn. Data Sheets, MSDS, and partially also CONN’s Biol.Stains,10th Ed, Handbook of Dyes, Stains and Fluorochromes for Use in Biology & Medicine (Horobin RW & Kiernan JA,,Eds) BIOS Scientifuic Publishers,Oxford UK, 2002,ISBN 1 85996 099 5).
    I assume you can calculate 0.01mM of Rhodamine in g/L for your purposes. In water there should be sufficient solubility. If you have problems with dissolution, try ultrasonic treatment or heat water to 50-60°C, stir thoroughly(at least 3-4 hrs). Best regards and good luck, Wolfgang MUSS, SALZBURG, AUSTRIA
  • Does anyone have experience with central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) treated with salmon calcitonin in adults?
    I'd like to know the experience of the researchers about the use, efficacy, safety and side effects of this therapy for large CGCG.
    Marconi Eduardo Sousa Maciel Santos · Associação Caruaruense de Ensino Superior
    Thanks for contributions. This article published by Pogrel is really very good and will help us, so thank you Dr Bharkava. When I was in my post-graduate I followed one case reported in this attached paper and the results using calcitonin spray was very good in a growing child and really costed much time like said Dr Varol. Now I´m treating an adult woman with a large CGCG intra-osseous.
  • Muhammad Shoaib Ahmedani added an answer:
    What is the role of the host in dental caries development?
    What is the role of the host in dental Caries development?
    Muhammad Shoaib Ahmedani · King Saud University
    More favourite and friendly the host there is likelihood of more vigorous and prolonged stay of the guest depleting all resources and assets of the host. Thus micro environment of the host contributes significantly in caries development.
  • Purnima S Kumar added an answer:
    A change in periodontal terminology?
    I've read several periodontal articles written in the '90s that mention pulpal and gingival periodontitis. Are these titles alternative terms for the pathological types referred to as periapical and planar (AC) periodontitis in more recent work? Thanks!
    Purnima S Kumar · The Ohio State University
    There is a lot of newer work that has explored the bacterial etiology of periodontitis using open-ended molecular approaches. I think it is important to understand the 70% of oral bacteria are presently uncultivated, and therefore, the findings of these sequencing based publications are important. A PubMed search using keywords uncultivated, 16S, sequencing, periodontal will pull up several recent publications

About Periodontics and Oral Pathology

Oral pathology, Oral medicine, Dentistry, Periodontology

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