Insect Distribution

Insect Distribution

  • Nadir Erbilgin added an answer:
    What method would you recommend to count weevils on sites?

    Hi all,

    I would like to compare and abundance of weevils on two sites to learn if the increased weevil infestation of acorns is due to differences in abundance of those insects. Thus, I need some index of abundance. I have not yet worked with weevils yet so I am not sure what kind of method should I use.

    I read on the Internet about weevil traps and I found for example traps like that:

    http://www.iscatech.com/ecommerce/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=24_1&products_id=22

    Maybe installing them on trees in autumn and then couting catched indivuduals in spring will work? Or maybe I could even install them now and get and index of abundance this year?

    I am doing my research on red oaks in eastern US.

    Anyone who has any experience with the subject - please share!.

    Nadir Erbilgin · University of Alberta

    If you do not know the biology of insects, I would recommend the simplest way of sampling: collect acorns time to time if you can. I would say collect 10 acorns per tree from multiple trees over time. I would collect acorns from the same trees over and over again. 

  • What could be the interest to include some parasitoid species (like some Hymenoptera Braconidae) into the Redlist of IUCN?

    Threatened insects are not so common and nearly none of them are parasitoids.

    But some of the parasitoids species could probably also be considered as threatened because their high specialization to one or few hosts, their distribution (a lot of species of Braconidae are known only from few specimens or few places, even if this could be a bias of sampling) or their presence in threatened area (like rain forests).

    Is this opportunity could help to their studies or the conservation of several areas/ecosystems? Did you have information, ideas, papers, example of such cases?

    Marta-Inés Saloña Bordas · Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea

    Sorry, it seems that my last answer has not benn properly uploaded!

    I was saying "Especially, if the host is a pest or cause any other damage." I am going to attend an exciting session about Parasitoids in the European Congress of Entomology that is taking place in York (UK) Let see what experts argue...

  • Can anyone identify this Cicadellid?

    This specimen is collected on mulerry, boxwood, raspberry, citrus and many other host plant.

    Dr-Abdalbaset A. A. Bugila · Sabha University

    I Agree with  Igor Malenovsky's answer

  • Paul Scholte added an answer:
    Do you have the habit of eating insects in your country?
    I am doing a survey on the habit of "eating insect" all over the world.
    Paul Scholte · Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit

    Especially during their irregular outbreaks, desert locusts are considered a great delicacy in Yemen (and posing major problems with parallel eradication campaigns), whereas at the onset of rains in Northern Cameroon and Chad (where I live at the moment) (male) termites flying out are much sought after. AS far as I am aware off, little to none has been published on this.

  • Bernard Boateng added an answer:
    Can someone identify this Coccinellidae species?
    Recently found in Serbia
    Bernard Boateng · University of Ghana

    Good work, guys

  • In which country are insects the most popular human food and what kinds of insects?
    In Western Kenya, termites are a delicacy.
    Eduardo Goncalves Paterson Fox · University of Lausanne

    People should always be reminded that insects are regularly consumed in food in all countries as an inevitable outcome of agriculture and storage and exposure of goods until consumption, particularly remains of eggs and larvae. If one is young, lives in a really cold country and totally avoids vegetables, there might be a chance that this person has yet never eaten any insect. Regarding accidental consumption of insects, I would assume that residents of tropical and subtropical regions must have the highest inadvertent rates of entomophagy.

  • Ranjith Raveendran added an answer:
    Who knows a good place in the southern US where Microplitis croceipes can be collected on the field?
    If possible, in AL, GA, MS, TN, FL
    Ranjith Raveendran · University of Calicut
    Microplitis croceipes (Cresson) 1872, is a potential parasitoid of Helicoverpa zea Boddie, 1850 (Corn worm) and Heliothis virescence Fabricius, 1777 (Tobacco bud worm). If there is Corn field and Tobacco plants in Southern US you can easily see the Host larvae and try to collect the larvae and starts to rear it. This parasitoid is specific for those host larvae.
  • Anya Metcalfe added an answer:
    Is anyone familiar with the larval stage of Cisthene moths (Arctiidae)?
    Can the caterpillars be found in bio soil crusts? I collect adult Cisthene angelus by the thousands along the riparian corridor of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, but their caterpillars are nowhere to be found. There's not a ton of lichen throughout the river corridor, it depends on which rock layers are exposed (seems like the lichen is mostly on limestones). What can you tell me about these elusive caterpillars? Where have you found them?
    Anya Metcalfe · United States Geological Survey
    Christian - I will keep this in mind and look for tree lichens on my next trip down Grand Canyon. There are not too many trees in the riparian zone, I'm going to check the mesquites and cat claw acacias in the old high water zone for lichens. Do you have any further advice for finding them? Will the caterpillars be easiest to spot with white or UV light? Do you know of anything they are attracted to? Are the eggs large enough to be seen with the naked eye?

    Sorry for the bombardment of questions. Thanks so much for your response!
  • Muhamad Ikhwan Idris added an answer:
    Why are lowland forests insect species more diverse than in the highland forests?
    The lower the elevation, the more diverse the insect species are than those living in places at higher altitude.
    Muhamad Ikhwan Idris · University Malaysia Sarawak
    Highland forest can be regarded as an habitat island (surrounded by different kind of habitat due to its altitude). The land area doesnt necessary (or guaranteed) to have a higher number of species. Numbers of habitat that present in one particular (even though it's smaller) could lead to a higher number of diversity compared to a bigger area with less types of habitat.

    It's all governed by the plant species and distribution. Since many plants can adapt to lower altitude, many plants could be found thus leads to many species of insects (provided that they might be specialist). However, those which could adapt to the highland forest could be unique and cant be found elsewhere.
  • Azhar Abbas Khan added an answer:
    How can I tell apart the sexes of syrphidae flies?
    I'm separating the sexes of syrphidae flies.
    Azhar Abbas Khan · University of Sargodha
    The males of Syrphidae, have larger eyes than the females. They need that superior vision to locate the female: In some cases the male’s eyes are so big that they meet at the top of the head, You will have no trouble identifying the sex of Syrphid flies.
  • Joanna Zalewska Gałosz added an answer:
    I wonder if any standards exist for presentation of geographical coordinates in scientific publications?
    I
    Joanna Zalewska Gałosz · Jagiellonian University
    Dear All,
    Thanks for your answers. Normally I used 'degree, minutes, seconds' but decimal degrees format is more and more popular in sharing geodata.
    All the best, Joanna
  • Cipriano Foxi asked a question:
    Does anyone have articles or research papers on identification keys for european ceratopogonidae?
    In particular I would need identification keys for the species of Forcipomyia, Dasyhelea, Atrichopogon, Alluaudomyia and Bezzia present in the Mediterranean basin.
  • András Bozsik added an answer:
    Do you have any experiences on the spread and damage of Metcalfa pruinosa (Flatidae) in your country?
    Citrus flatid planthopper, a native insect to North America, have had for a long time a scarce economic importance there. However, being polyphagous made small damage on citrus trees and some ornamentals. In 1979 it was introduced to Italy where it established and spread quickly. It is now an invasive alien species (IAS) continually spreading in South and Central Europe causing considerable damage in grapevine, fruit trees and various ornamentals.

    In Hungary M. pruinosa causes damage - as in other European countries - in grapevine, fruit and other ornamental trees and shrubs. Unfortunately, it spreads in semi-natural and natural areas like hedges. I have observed nymphs, adults and vaxy filaments of M. pruinosa on the majority (70%) of the trees and shrubs in a hedge.

    Infested plants – among them some with American origin – were: Acer negundo, Celtis occidentalis, Clematis vitalba, Crataegus monogyna, Hedera helix, Juglans regia, Lycium barbarus, Malus domestica, Morus alba, Prunus domestica, Prunus padus, Prunus serotina, Prunus spinosa, Robinia pseudo-acacia, Rosa canina, Ulmus campestris but also Euphorbia cyparissias.

    The length of similar hedges can be several hundred km long, which means M. pruinosa has plenty of opportunity for spreading along the railway and infesting agricultural and ornamental cultures.

    Where and on which vegetation have you observed this IAS? How much important damage have you detected?
    András Bozsik · University of Debrecen
    Dear Mauri,

    Many thanks for your help.
  • Anders Lindström added an answer:
    Can someone advise on the Russian distribution of the mosquito Orthopodomyia pulcripalpis (Diptera: Culicidae)?
    In Fauna Europaea Orthopodomyia pulcripalpis is listed as present in NW Russia in the region where St Petersburg is. I cannot find any reference to this record. Does anybody know where that record is listed?

    Link to map in Fauna Europaea: http://www.faunaeur.org/Maps/display_map.php?map_name=euro&map_language=en&taxon1=135026
    Anders Lindström · National Veterinary Institute, Sweden
    I've had no further success in this matter, but will report back if I find out anything.
  • Paride Dioli added an answer:
    Any ideas or suggestions about the passive transport of insects on highways by windage?
    Working on the spread of Lygaeus creticus (Heteroptera) I suggested that the median of the highway, which is made ​​up of oleander, has transferred this species from southern to northern Italy. It seems that even windage operated by heavy goods vehicles has a significant impact. I'm checking out the possibility that this hypothesis is applicable to other species of insects and am looking for references in Literature.
    Paride Dioli · Museum of Natural History Milano, Italy
    Thank You very mach for your suggestions. They are very useful in my studies about the dispersion of Heteroptera in Italy by the principal highways, from Southern, mediterranean coasts, to Northern regions.
    Best
    Paride
  • Peter Hondelmann added an answer:
    Have any one encountered fruit flies (Tephritidae) flying (or drifting) at high altitude?
    I am interested in migration pathways of fruit flies in general and Medfly in particular. Medfly tend to reappear “out of the blue” in certain places without living a clue to where they came from and how. Many insects are flying quite high when crossing long distances, and I guess so are the tephritids. So I guess this question is mainly addressed to aerobiologists who are practicing different approaches to detect flying insects.
    Peter Hondelmann · Leibniz Universität Hannover
    There are surprisingly many publications about "aerial plankton" such as "Studies in the distribution of insects by aerial currents" by Hardy & Milne (1938), Hardy & Cheng (1986) (with three parts) at least mentioning Drosophilidae in the first one, but I've no access to the others. Anyway they contain family and species lists. "Transoceanic dispersal studies of insects" by Holzapfel & Harell (1968) mentions Trypetidae in their catches,
    Also "THE DISTRIBUTION OF INSECTS, SPIDERS, AND MITES IN THE AIR" by Glick (1939) lists Trypetid species. So you have your answer (but medfly?).
    If you search for aerial plankton and Trypetidae (the older name for Tephritidae) you surely find more articles, since many of the studies were done before 1990.
  • Sumodan Pk added an answer:
    Is there anybody working on Lampyridae?
    One of my students would like to work on Lampyrid fauna of Kerala, India. Unfortunately, there are not many publications on this group in India.
    Sumodan Pk · Government College Madappally
    Thank you Justine.
  • Peter Smetacek added an answer:
    How does resource partitioning occur in dry deciduous forests among butterflies?
    When I observed various species, alfa and beta diversity of fauna (insects) is much influenced by ecological aspects. How does resource partition occur in Butterflies? Do you have evidence? Please send some literature.
    Peter Smetacek · Butterfly Research Center, Bhimtal
    What sort of resources are you looking at? If you mean nectar or other sources of sugar or salts, there is no partitioning, except on a first-come first-served basis. If you mean larval host plants, different species have different strategies, Some are gregarious and in some species, if a female sees another female of the species ovipositing, she will lay her eggs there too, so that there are very many larvae on the plants. In other cases, a single larva on the plant will discourage other females from even ovipositing on that plant.
  • Pir Asmat Ali added an answer:
    Can someone advise on the distribution of Vespa velutina?
    Vespa velutina, according to Hua (Hua, L.-Z. 2006. List of Chinese Insects. Vol. IV. Sun Yat-sen University Press, Guangzhou, China), is found north to the province of Hubei in China. I would be very interested in hearing from anyone in China whether or not this wasp survives even further north, or whether other records of it (such as reported by Villemant et al. from Beijing: Villemant, C., Barbet-Massin, M., Perrard, A., Muller, F., Gargominy, O., Jiguet, F. and Rome, Q. 2011. Predicting the invasion risk by the alien bee-hawking Yellow-legged hornet Vespa velutina nigrithorax across Europe and other continents with niche models. Biological Conservation 144(9):2142-2150) might represent introductions to northern areas without establishment.

    I am assessing the risk of this wasp to Canada, which is a rather cold, northern country, colder on average than Hubei province, but not colder than Beijing, at least in parts of the country.
    Pir Asmat Ali · Islamia College Peshawar
    Dear Martin Damus
    Thanks for correction
  • Michaela Vasileva asked a question:
    What light are workers and soldiers of the Formosan subterranean termite not sensitive to (such as infrared light)?
    Is there any other light that they are not sensitive to at all (like infrared light)?
  • Hendrik Freitag added an answer:
    What common species of SE Asian ant (Formicidae) is suitable for a formicarium? Are there commercially available colonies in SE Asia / Philippines?
    Im looking for an ant species, easy to rear, that should be indigenous to the Philippines to avoid the risk of introducing an exotic species. Has anyone heard about commercially available breeding sets / colonies / formicidaria in SE Asia or the Philippines?
    Hendrik Freitag · Ateneo de Manila University
    Dear Eraldo and Dirk,
    thanks a lot for your helpfull comments. I might contact you personally, if more questions arise.
  • Alessandro Ferrarini added an answer:
    Measuring the proximity of vineyards to forest edges.
    I am collecting some potential abiotic factors for determining the most important risk factor(s) associated with the infestation of one of the Lepidopteran insect pests in vineyards. One of the potential factors that I am considering is 'proximity to a forest', assuming that wild vines might contribute to vineyard infestations. I am planning to use google maps/google earth to measure the distance, however, I am not sure what the best way to measure would be. Could I average the perpendicular distances between forest edge and vineyard edge taken at three different points on each side? Is there any standard method that researchers have been following?
    Alessandro Ferrarini · Università degli studi di Parma
    could distance of vineyards to forest edges be a friction distance that is determined by a factor like wind direction and speed?

    In other words, is it possible that insects follow directions facilitated by winds? In this case, the fittest distance is the minimum one along the most common wind direction
  • Thierry Robert added an answer:
    I am looking information on catches of Lycorina triangulifera Holmgren (Hymenoptera Ichneumonidae) in Europe
    It seems that the specimens are always in small quantities (1 or 2). Does anyone have information on this matter particularly with the use of Malaise traps?
    Thierry Robert · Office National des Forêts
    Ok Alexey, thanks for your answer. Do you know someone at SMTP who can give me some data on Lycorina ?
  • Qasem Mousavi added an answer:
    Could anyone help me find out what is the maximum amount of the food that a moth like flour moth "Ephestia sp." can eat in its life cycle?
    I want to know much food does this moth consume during the period of egg until becoming pupa.
    Qasem Mousavi · University of Tehran
    I've seen numbers about the amount but I'm not sure about it yet. actually I am doing feeding experiment on the larvae, I just wanna know others ideas. thanks Nadine
  • Zhou Xiaogui asked a question:
    Can someone provide information about the cremaster numbers of insect pupa in genus Striglina?
    I observed one pupa of genus Striglina(Lepidoptera:Thyrididae), found 8 cremasters at the pupa‘s end. But I don’t know if other species of this genus are all the same, who has researched them? Can you give me some lectures, especially in 3 tea plant pests, Striglia suzukii, Striglina glareola and Striglina scitaria, in China.
  • Malal Diop added an answer:
    Who works with the identification of mosquitoes vectors?
    Identification to species level of the genus Culex
  • Jon Richfield added an answer:
    Is buttefly collection justified?
    For scientific purposes, collecting specimens of butterflies is important to understand different subjects of their biology. Now we are in a time in where a lot species are endangered or with populations declines, should it be justified?
    True Alexander, true! It is all to do with the way that all things in science in general and biology in particular are connected. Pull at one thread and the whole tangle follows. I think however that the colleagues may well have agreed by now that on the one hand, some purposes in biology require little more information than photographs can supply (not to mention that photographs often can tell many things that no pinned or preserved specimen can can tell) whereas other applications demand biological material. You cannot tell DNA from pictures for example.
    Again, some organisms, such as Papilio demodocus or Colias electo (assuming no names have changed recently!) here in South Africa don't seem threatened by collection, and many threatened species seem to have worse problems than any collectors could cause, but it is possible that some species small in population, with tightly limited range and specialised ecological demands, could well be pushed into oblivion by keen collectors. Again, even a rare species will not be affected by a specimen being collected after it had finished with its reproduction.
    It always is a matter of perspective. No?
  • Mubenga Kankonda added an answer:
    What is the correct environmental index to consider when studying forest degradation
    Impact of landscape anthropization ( e.g. Forest degradation ) on insect population dynamics
    Mubenga Kankonda · University of Kisangani
    Thanks Jincai for your effort to help me. What I really is to have an idea about usually used metrics to measure landscape structure and composition when studying insects response to habitat anthropisation. Maybe you can have a good idea in this regard. aspect.
  • Amar Jyoti Duarah added an answer:
    Sampling for insect species identification
    I'm new to insect sampling and taxonomy. What is the best way to sample Mirids especially the species of Helopeltis in an island? Can anybody recommend a taxonomist of this genus to consult with?
    Amar Jyoti Duarah · Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), New Delhi
    You are welcome. I'm sorry for replying late. My email ID: ajduarah@gmail.com

About Insect Distribution

Significant factors limiting the geographic distribution of individual species of insects relative to climate change

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