Educational Technology

Educational Technology

  • Linda Robson added an answer:
    How do we encourage students to produce more interesting/engaging presentations?
    'Death by Powerpoint' is a problem but really what are the alternatives? Prezi? Machinima?
    Linda Robson · The Open University (UK)
    I've not read all the responses so this may have already been said... I think the key to this is to provide more engaging presentations ourselves so that they can learn from good examples. It is not powerpoint which is the problem, but the way it is used. I've recently had to do a Pecha Kucha presentation for a conference I'm presenting at. Initially I was very anti that format and couldn't work out how I would get my points across with a rigid number of slides and all having to be displayed for 20 seconds. But once I got into producing it I quickly decided that I would only show images and all my content will be in what I actually say. Without any text on my slides the audience isn't distracted from what I am saying. It's not the answer to all presentations but the more creative we are the more students are likely to be creative themselves.
  • Hatem Maraqah added an answer:
    Is the use of untested technologies in classrooms unethical?
    Those who develop technological products should be asked to spend their own funds to conduct research to find out the benefits of using their products in schools. They should be allowed to sell only those products that have been extensively researched and found to be helpful to learners and teachers. Any side effects should be noted on warning labels that are affixed to the products.
    Hatem Maraqah · Hebron University
    I agree with Aiman Al-Omari
  • Danil Dintsis added an answer:
    eEducation - forty years of promises?
    Instructional computer programs (or the usage of computers in education) are being developed since the early ‘70s. Rapid development of Information Communication Technology, introduction of computers into schools, and daily use of computers by people of different vocation, education and age, has made education a very important field to researchers. Their main goals have been to develop programs that can teach humans and to achieve individualization of the educational process. The methods and techniques of Artificial Intelligence have been successfully used in these systems, since the end of last century. Hierarchical modeling, interoperable and reusable software components, and ontology are modeling techniques that have only recently penetrated into the eLearning. In addition, these Artificial Intelligence methods are used in new “field” I called it "eEducation", a new approach to education with the help of Information and Communication Technologies, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence. Your thoughts on: Could we described "eEducation" = "eLearning" + "eTeaching", by this “simple” equation? Alternatively, do we need more "+"? Are we all (researchers, teachers and students) have succeeded in eEducation (eLearning) so far? Do "users" of eEducation (eLearning) systems are "better" than traditional students are, in a since of learning gain? Do we have right pedagogy (teaching methods/strategies) for eEducation (eLearning)? Do we have right learning strategies (models/theories) for eEducation (eLearning)? At the end, what is the future of eEducation (eLearning)?
    Danil Dintsis · Specialist Computer Training Center
    According to this very interesting discussion and my own experience as well, i suppose the term "e-Education" is too common now. We have too many different types of education/learning, which we may name "e-SOMETHING". Anf they are quite different. For example, are webinars e-Education. Yes! And mentored or as we call it open learning using off-line recordings? YES too! Or brief 10-15 minutes podcasts for smartphones? And many others as well. Should we start different branches of the discussion?
  • Mehdi Hedayatpoor added an answer:
    How can we integrate technology in teaching?
    Should we develop TPACK?
    Mehdi Hedayatpoor · University of Yazd
    When technology integration in the classroom is seamless and thoughtful, students not only become more engaged, they begin to take more control over their own learning, too. Effective tech integration changes classroom dynamics, encouraging student-centered project-based learning. Think about how you are using technology with your students. Are they employing technology daily in the classroom, using a variety of tools to complete assignments and create projects that show a deep understanding of content? If your answer is "No," is it because you lack enough access to technology? Is it because you don't feel ready? Or do you feel ready, but need additional support in your classroom? Depending on your answer, your path to tech integration may look different from someone else's. However varied access and readiness may be, tech integration can successfully occur in any classroom.
  • Dony Saputra added an answer:
    What is the best way to handle skillset diversity in a classroom ?
    I am going to teach a required Freshmen class to 50 students from 7 different engineering disciplines. I taught it last year, and it was the most challenging teaching experience I had, since it was impossible to determine a level I should teach it at, due to the skillset diversity in the classroom. May be, a teacher would sometimes give up on the students that didn't have good skills, and would concentrate on the skilled ones. This happened to me when I was 12: I was a star student when it came to math, and hopeless when it came to art. My only hope was that, the C's and D's from the art classes wouldn't drag my GPA down too hard to prevent me from getting accepted to a good high school. This continued until the last year of secondary school. The last year, we had another art class. I was dreading going into the class, which actually surprisingly wasn't terrible. The teacher was even smiling at me. Our first project was knitting a small macramé carpet. The teacher, after helping a few other students, came to me and showed me how it worked. It was actually a pretty mathematical thing :) The patterns were very mathematical. Or, may be, she explained it to me like that. It made sense to me ! I really got into it, and knit one of the best macrames in the class. I enjoyed her class a lot, and did well in almost every project. I might have gotten an A- or A or something. My mom still has it hung up on her wall after 30 years and she was so proud. 30+ years later, I am still hopeless when it comes to art . But, I can't stop asking myself the question: Who was the biggest influence in my life ? Was it the great math teachers that gave me a real good background which was crucial in making me a good engineer ? or the art teacher that made me believe that, "I can do anything if I put my mind into it" ? So, my question to you, folks : What is the best way to handle a classroom of students with very diverse skillsets ?
    Dony Saputra · Surya University
    From my experience mapping and investigating students learning styles and prior knowledge is very important at the begining of the class. After that we can group it by their learning styles and differentiated instruction. E.g group into visual verbal and kinestetic style that contain weak and smart student in each group. After that modified the material that fit into the style that can achieved course objective using their group style. It might help in some classes but may not depends on prior assesment that i've explained before. Your case is because of teacher know what is your learning styles and interest so she or he can adapt the lesson to you.
  • Louis Brassard added an answer:
    Can creativity be improved with practice?
    Folks, here is a typical scenario for me: I work so hard for a research proposal, and it looks good, but that one "punch line" is missing ... Something really creative that will make the proposal stand out ... I think about it all night, NOTHING. So, I go to sleep. Tomorrow, I wake up, and after doing a few things, go back to the proposal, and it just CLICKS. Boom. The creative thing I was trying to find is right there ... It is as if aliens abducted me in my sleep, took me to Mars, where they showed me their already existing solution :) This must have happened to you folks too. How can you explain this ? Ok, since the "Alien abduction theory" has serious scientific holes in it :) we might turn to neuroscience to find an answer for this phenomenon: *** Sometimes, when rational thought is abandoned, creative work seems to happen by itself (Koestler 1964). *** While during conscious processing, a large portion of the brain is involved, fMRI studies show that, only the sensory areas are active for automatic (motor) processing (Schneider 2009). What these studies suggest is that, there are two Tolga's in my brain: TOLGA-C (conscious TOLGA, which does its work by conscious deliberation), and TOLGA-M (motor TOLGA, which does unconscious -motor- processing). When we are subjected to a very difficult problem and stop thinking about it, we are initially using TOLGA-C, and when we stop paying attention, TOLGA-M still continues to solve the problem and eventually it might solve it before TOLGA-C ... So, creativity might get help from TOLGA-M through unconscious processing. So, if creativity can benefit from such a motor skill, does this mean that, we can practice it ? Just like soccer ? In other words, by timing THINK/STOP patterns, can we train TOLGA-M (the motor part of our brain) to help us be more creative ?
    The bulk of the creative process is done sub-consciously. Should we be surprised? It is like everything that we do that is complex. When I write this post, I am vaguely conscious of what I want to say but I am not conscious on the multiple ways my fingers are proceeding to type of the keyboards, how my eyes are fixating the screen and processing this information, at infinitum. It would not be possible to talk if I had to consciously move my tongue. But in these actions that are done through the mastery in our childhood of numerous skills which through this mastering can become automated and sub-conscious, consciousness was central to this mastery and probably a certain amount of creativity. Learning to walk by a child is a kind of re-inventing walking at the personal level and so it is creative.
  • Kenny Borgas added an answer:
    What are some ways to help students identify with science? And how might technology be used?
    Sure ... cool, immersive, interactive virtual worlds can bolster interest, self-efficacy, and savviness of scientific thinking. But if kids don't identify with science, the affordances of tech are greatly diminished. By the way, shout out to the EcoMUVE crew.
    Kenny Borgas · Northcentral University
    I think getting more children involved in the sciences is important given the technological world we live in today (esp. getting more girls involved). One way, is to encourage schools to develop organized science teams that can compete against one another. I believe children are becoming overly engaged in electronics/technology at the expense of other important cognitive skills. For example, everyday household items can be used as teaching tools or in science experiments (e.g., two cups, a string, to demonstrate how sound waves travel, then generalizing this to electronics, etc). Using the natural environment and everyday items in explaining science can be extremely useful in generating interest, as well as maintaining it. It is also important to utilize other skills (i.e., fine motor skills) for the overall development of cognition. The more sensory modes we can encourage in learning, the more "balanced" a child is in terms of the inputs that information traverses in order for processing to occur. I also believe schools can organize fields trips to places like NASA or Lookheed Martin and even have some of their scientists speak at their schools...however, we must generate this interest early (perhaps 3rd grade). Like most role models, children must be able to identify with who is speaking to them so as to engage and inspire them.
  • Sandra Herbert added an answer:
    How can we develop Mathematic TPACK?
    Niess et al (2009, p. 18-19) presented a theoretical integration of TPACK in Mathematics teaching/learning, "Mathematics TPACK", organized, with similarity to that proposed by AMTE Technology Committee (2009), in around four areas: 1- Designing and developing digital-age learning environments and experiences – Teachers design and develop authentic learning environments and experiences incorporating appropriate digital-age tools and resources to maximize mathematical learning in context. 2- Teaching, learning and the Mathematics curriculum – Teachers implement curriculum plans that include methods and strategies for applying appropriate technologies to maximize student learning and creativity in Mathematics. 3- Assessment and evaluation – Teachers apply technology to facilitate a variety of effective assessment and evaluation strategies. 4- Productivity and professional practice – Teachers use technology to enhance their productivity and professional practice.
    Sandra Herbert · Deakin University
    I see technology as just another tool in my tool kit for teaching. I think it's really important to begin with the mathematical objective of the lesson, then consider the learners and any prior knowledge they may bring to the lesson, then I look at my tool kit and select the appropriate tool. This tool might be a CAS calculator or IWB interactive or iPad app or physical manipulatives or virtual manipulatives. The list goes on and on. I might ask them to use physical manipulatives, take a photo, import into Explain Everything on the iPad and annotate their photo to demonstrate their learning ........
  • Carlos Eduardo Maldonado added an answer:
    What is your opinion about international rankings such as Scimago?
    There is an increase of international rankings that rank universities fundamentally for their research results.
    Carlos Maldonado · Universidad del Rosario
    Scientometry is a recent and most important discipline. It all started, it seems, with the Canberra report, and front then on. In the past scientists, philosophers, researchers didn't have such a framework - that can be used sometimes as a constraint. The not so kind face of scientometry are the rankings; at least in the current situation.
  • Ljubomir Jerinic added an answer:
    Which factors or indices effect the success of learning management system?
    Needed to find the weight of each element on success of LMS.
    Ljubomir Jerinic · University of Novi Sad
    @Rolando Do you have this papers (or similar) in English. I'm a little rusty with the Spanish...
  • Hossein Mohammadi added an answer:
    What do you understand as a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) in your everyday practice?
    Recent research has brought up a number of definitions, explanations and first prototypes of a so called Personal Learning Environment (PLE). Definitions reach from a fully integrated, adaptive platform with tools to support individual cognitive processes on the one hand, to "your tablet PC and everything that can be run on it" on the other hand. While the latter one does not seem to justify a hype neither in Technology Enhanced Learning research nor in education at all, the first one did not really come to practice - as far as I know. Moreover, the term of an institutional PLE (iPLE) came up. This may underline the active role that educational institutions still play in providing educational technology to learners, despite all innovations of the Web 2.0 and beyond. However, I still don't know about any succesful realization of such an iPLE that is used in a university. What do you say: Was PLE just a hype? Are there any projects that delivered more than a prototype, any platforms that are currently used? What did you expect from a PLE that existing teaching and learning platforms do not provide? Or maybe, is PLE not the right term for what we expect from such a platform?
    Hossein Mohammadi · Allameh Tabatabai University
    Personalized learning environment improve online learning effectiveness in terms of examination, satisfaction, and self-efficacy criteria. The work carried out by Xu et al. (2014) can shed the light on this. Xu, D., W. Huang, W., Wang, H., Heales, J. 2014. Enhancing e-learning effectiveness using an intelligent agent-supported personalized virtual learning environment: an empirical investigation. Information & Management (available online 7 March 2014) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.im.2014.02.009
  • Fathi M Sherif added an answer:
    What are the main advantages and disadvantages of using PowerPoint presentations in class?
    Many teachers now use excessive PowerPoint presentations.
    Fathi M Sherif · University of Tripoli
    It differs from one science to another, I agree that power point is not the main tool for teaching but teacher is the source of education and information for students (based on interaction between teach and student). Power point could be just a secondary tool to help teachers for illustration of figures that needed to be shown for students to save time in lecturing. Using power point to help in teachers and students is the primary reason and not just to read the slides.
  • Marco Greco added an answer:
    What is your experience with Business Simulation Games?
    We are doing research on the topic and would like to learn about different ways in which instructors employed business simulation games with their students.
    Marco Greco · Università degli studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale
    Hi, you may want to check this recent article on the topic http://sag.sagepub.com/content/44/5/645.full.pdf+html
  • Jayant Patel added an answer:
    Do Improvements in educational technology lead to improvements in pedagogy?
    With MOOC buzzing around the world will educational standards improve or decrease
    Jayant Patel · Ganpat University
    I do agree. As you said "Judicious use of modern educational technology does improve pedagogy. Optimization should be the aim..." definetly I would add, Pedagogy is the Basic Art of Teaching hence Technology can help as a media/techniques for facilitation to grasp concept. Simply improved technology gadgets if not utilised properly than it doesnot serve the objectives of Pedagogy.
  • Shannon Gray asked a question:
    Does anyone know of a measurement tool for risk taking in gaming and learning technology programs?
    I am putting together a proposal for a quantitative research class. I am looking at any correlations between risk taking in gaming that carry over to risk taking when learning new computer programs. I am looking for a valid and reliable measurement that is already created.
  • Gayle Thieman added an answer:
    To what extent can the assumed learning affordances of iPads be taken for granted given the lack of empirical evidence?
    Quote: "...what emerged is no clear indication that the iPad has some inherent learning affordances that were prevalent among the majority of participating students. Instead, what was identified is a patchwork of uses and often-conflicting perceptions about the use of iPads for SBL. Thus, the claim that the iPad has considerable potential to enhance learning cannot be supported in the context of the bottom-up approach adapted in this research..."
    Gayle Thieman · Portland State University
    I am conducting a multi-year mixed method study of the impact of a 1:1 iPad project at a high poverty urban high school in the Pacific Northwest. Quantitative data include student technology experience/skills surveys, technology use surveys, district demographic/academic/attendance data; qualitative data include class observations (using ISTE observation protocol) and teacher focus groups. There are some significant differences on student survey responses based on access to the iPad. Data analysis of impact on attendance and learning gains is in progress.
  • Kelly Elander asked a question:
    Is anyone currently researching or trying to implement learning approaches that combine both objectivist and constructivist learning methods?
    This is an area I have studied and wish to continue pursuing.
  • Steven Venette added an answer:
    Learning Style in Teaching and Learning. Do you think it's only rhetoric or reality?
    I'm doing my research on individual learning styles. However, some researcher did mention that learning style is only rhetoric in teaching and learning. Is it more relevent if we focus the research on different thinking styles. What do you think? I believe that different learning style exist among learners but in a different context.
    Steven Venette · University of Southern Mississippi
    An important consideration is how one defines "learning styles." Currently the research on learning styles is disjointed. Many different approaches exist. Some approaches appear valid and reliable, others...well...not so much. I am currently doing work that is based on Kolb's learning styles using Sellnow's Learning Style Quiz. The Cronbach's alpha is consistently .8 or higher.
  • Nageswara Rao Posinasetti added an answer:
    What are the must-have/indispensable components of an online course? Are there any good models to follow?
    I am delivering online courses integrated with Skype tutorial in a web-based format. They are 12-week courses with 2-hour Skype tutorial each week. At the moment, I have some students registered from Vietnam and some from Australia.Those who are experienced in online teaching, please share with me your success and expertise on this area. Thank you.
    Nageswara Posinasetti · University of Northern Iowa
    Quality Matters (https://www.qualitymatters.org/higher-education-program) is the program that is developed exclusively to maintain the standards for on line and blended courses. It provides a rubric (https://www.qualitymatters.org/rubric) to align the course material into various categories such as Course Overview and Introduction, Learning Objectives (Competencies), Assessment and Measurement, Instructional Materials, Learner Interaction and Engagement, Course Technology, Learner Support, and Accessibility. By following the rubric aligning your course contents with them, it is possible to develop online courses that are successful. It also has an arrangement for peer review of the online courses.
  • Saed Sabah added an answer:
    What could we do to reduce the very low academic results in basic science subjects in the early years of engineering careers?
    Today academic results of students in the first years of engineering careers are very low which causes the output of the university. Scientific research is essential to improve the quality of future specialists, due to the high rate of development of science and technology which professionals have to respond creatively to the problems of greatest relevance and importance. Developing scientific thinking is one of the purposes of Higher Education and it is responsibility of all the disciplines that compose a career. Among the main functions of a university professor is their ability to use the results of the research to form the student. The scientific research should be an academic requirement since the early years of career, as part of integral formation of students. We have results of the physical discipline in the development of student scientific work with students of the Biomedical Engineering career at the Instituto Superior Politecnico Jose Antonio Echeverria, significantly increasing the number of students participating in scientific research and their motivation for this, the activity of independent and creative work and making the link between knowledge and practice as well as the integration with other disciplines of the career.
    Saed Sabah · Hashemite University - JORDAN
    I think that the use of various research-based instructional strategies by Engineering faculty would improve the outcomes of engineering programs. Here is a related paper: Borrego, M., Cutler, S., Prince, M., Henderson, C., & Froyd, J. (accepted). Fidelity of Implementation of Research-Based Instructional Strategies (RBIS) in Engineering Science Courses. Journal of Engineering Education. [ available at http://homepages.wmich.edu/~chenders/Publications/Publications.htm ]
  • Gloria Mousalli added an answer:
    What Web 2 Tools have you used in teaching and learning and what impact have you made?
    Web 2 tools are available for us to use- to what extent have we adapted them?
    Gloria Mousalli · University of the Andes (Venezuela)
    I recommend using drive for collaborative work and interaction with groups. My experience has been outstanding for more than 3 years ago
  • Nitish Ranjan added an answer:
    Does today’s technology have adverse effects on student performance?
    Technology has become an essential part of the human life and an important companion for a convenient and easy living. Technology has helped the man kind to live better, live longer, and somewhat live happier due to the advancement of sciences in general and the improvement of medical and health sciences in particular. This progress in the scientific knowledge would have not been possible without the advent of technology. However, technology has come with a price and a high cost to the current generation of young students. For example, reading has declined drastically among young students in recent times. Reading has been replaced by playing video games, chatting on the social media, and spending a lot of time on the visual media. Moreover, technology has led to a sharp decline in the level of critical thinking of today’s students, and has adversely affected their analytical intelligence. Thus, technology has resulted in a lower level of academic performance, and a depreciated level of scholastic achievement by the young students of today. What is your input on this?
    Nitish Ranjan · KIIT University
    Everything has some positive aspect and some negative aspect. Introduction to new technologies like computers, internet, smart phones, calculators etc. has made the life easier but it also has some of the adverse effect on the students performance. With introduction of calculator, student do not want to calculate anything with themselves, for even small addition or subtraction they require calculators. With introduction to computers, they want to play games on it. With introduction to Television, they spent most of time watching cartoons and movies on it. and many more... Regards, Nitish
  • Stefanus Muryanto added an answer:
    Could Transport Phenomena be removed from chemical engineering undergraduate curriculum?
    I am considering proposing that TRANSPORT PHENOMENA be removed from chemical engineering undergraduate curiculum. This subject is more appropriate for graduate levels, because it is heavily theoretical. Moreover, experience have shown that only about the top 10% of the students pass the subject with good grades. For undergraduate level it is sufficient, I think, that students acquire deep knowledge of MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES. I would like to have your consideration in this matter.
    Stefanus Muryanto · Universitas 17 Agustus 1945 Semarang
    Thank you Maria, the pedagogical aspects should indeed be taken into consideration.
  • Chris Lange-Kuettner added an answer:
    Does anyone have experience with methods to measure the impact of technology on emotional regulation in children?
    Technology intervention focuses on emotional regulation in specific situations causing anxiety. I am interested in ways of assessing both specific and general effects in children aged 7-12 years.
    Chris Lange-Kuettner · London Metropolitan University
    Yes, when I test children with reaction time experiments, the teachers are usually delighted as they come out much more focused then they were before. See one publication on reaction time research with children Lange-Küttner, C. (2012). Invited article: The importance of reaction times for Developmental Science: What a difference milliseconds make. Inaugural Issue, International Journal of Developmental Science, 6, 51-55. DOI: 10.3233/DEV-2012-11089, open access publication at http://iospress.metapress.com/content/108q761118100865/?%20p=5b4231a625774fa5831d1512cd97a060&pi=11
  • Michael Sinclair added an answer:
    How has technology transformed learning in your classroom and how do you see this changing in the future?
    Thoughts about when you started in education and the tools available to you then. Has technology made an impact in what we do, how we do it and the effectiveness of our efforts. Is there any one piece of technology you have now that you find it difficult to imagine how your practice would be without it?
    Michael Sinclair · Queen Margaret University
    Thanks for the thoughts. I have taken a lot from your ideas. Here is a presentation I have made outlining the changes that have happened with the technology over the years. I don't have text, I'll be speaking through the images, but might add some later. See what you think. http://prezi.com/tbsyemda4h2v/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy
  • José Tavares added an answer:
    How can complex (collaborative) learning situations be enhanced in pedagogically meaningful ways using emergent mobile technologies?
    The challenges for us as (educational) scientists are much bigger than questions about whether mobile technology helps us to learn. Rather, many different organisations, countries and scientists are asking: What are the learning skills schools and other educational institutions should be promoting in order to prepare people for the 21st century learning society?
    José Tavares · University of Aveiro
    I agre with there atitudes and ideas
  • Kimberly Ann Packard added an answer:
    What kind of students does the world need?
    The University of the Future will somewhat be different from today’s universities and academic institutions. The fast advent of the educational sophisticated technology will definitely require new ways of disseminating information, and new requirements for teachers and faculty members to run the learning process of the future more efficiently. Technology and the new culture that accompanies it will certainly change higher education, and will demand governments and private academic institutions to change too. Universities will have to adapt to the expected changes in educational technology or will fail to produce higher quality students. The global economy of the future will search for students that can learn and relearn throughout their lives to contribute effectively to the wellbeing of the world. Creativity, innovation, and ingenuity should be the main goal of the coming future to produce superb students that will shape the fate of the next generations. What are your thoughts?
    Kimberly Packard · University of Phoenix
    @KC Lowe, I know about the "Heart to Heart" talk. It is the frequency and vibration or what I call "Heart Speak." It is one persons electromagnetic field communicating with another's magnetic field. It is a natural and common communication between energies. The saying of "Be careful what you wish for" or The answer is blowing in the wind" or "We are but echoes of our past history all illustrate this best. Great Post KC!
  • Michel Owayjan added an answer:
    Are learning (and teaching) EMOTIONAL or LOGICAL processes ?
    I remember the early days of my teaching, when I had to provide a simple example computer program to calculate 9/4=2.25. I would teach it like this: *** CASE 1: Use two variables a, and b that can hold two fractional values (called float). Store a=9, b=4, and calculate a/b=2.250. *** CASE 2: To calculate 9/4, choose INTEGER types which could not temporarily hold fractional values. I asked the students the following question: What happens when you divide 9 by 4 and multiply back by 4. The question was almost insulting to a highly intelligence 50 students, since 4*(9/4) should be 9. With great boredom, they watch me to write a computer program to divide 9 by 4, and multiply back by 4. The result was 8 !!! This happens, since integer type variables CHOP fractional values intermediately, so, 9/4=2 and 2*4=8 ... The interesting thing is, whenever I used CASE 2 type of "surprise factor" in teaching, the retention of what is LEARNed went from 40%-50% to almost 100%. Why ? Let's borrow some research from neuroscience to explain this: *** It takes approximately half a second (0.5 s) for stimuli content to reach consciousness (Libet , 1950) *** Left hemisphere (LH) of the brain performs analytical processing: Although this is slower, it is a lot more detailed. Right hemisphere (RH) respond to unexpected stimuli, and is a lot faster (MacNeilage 2009) *** Inter-hemispheric congruence means, both hemispheres are in concert. Each hemisphere has its own memory (Moss, 2014) What these studies suggest is that, my brain is made up of twin-TOLGA's : TOLGA-E (emotional TOLGA, located on the RH) responds mainly to emotional and unexpected stimuli in about 0.15 seconds and has his own emotional memories. TOLGA-A (Analytical Tolga, on the LH) has a 0.5 second delay and can do a lot of analytical processing, with its own memories. The CASE 2 was able to engage both TOLGA-E and TOLGA-A, and made the recording of this example a lot stronger, thereby significantly improving retention. This means that, in a class of 50 students, you really have 100 twins. One responds to unexpected stimuli faster, and the other (twin brother or sister) responds a lot slower with a lot more understanding on the details. When both of them record a memory, the retention is significantly better. So, does this mean that LEARNING (or TEACHING) are EMOTIONAL or LOGICAL processes ?
    Michel Owayjan · American University of Science and Technology Lebanon
    Without going into biology, when you learn something that you like (emotional) your learning experience is more successful than when you learn only by logic. Logic is very important and necessary for learning, but it can be enhanced with emotion. I teach introduction to computing course where the students are introduced to the binary numbering system. If you take the approach of pure logic in teaching binary numbers, students tend to learn less. But when you use an emotional approach (for example you shock the students by writing 1 + 1 = 10), and then use logic, the students will learn faster and will never forget the information.
  • Arun Vijay.S . added an answer:
    Effectiveness of course portfolio in improving course quality at the higher education level?
    A course portfolio is used to guide the teaching-learning process, and works as a resource exchange of course-specific teaching information that can be used as evidence for teaching quality and effectiveness of programs. Moreover, the course portfolio provides an opportunity to investigate the intersection between pedagogy (teaching) and learning. It helps us to determine relationships between what we do as teachers and what students do as learners. Can anyone suggest some research studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of course portfolios in improving quality of teaching and learning process of any particular course?
    Arun Vijay.S . · University of Dammam
    @Christine. I got a link with the author name you suggested. The article link is given below: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-3435.2006.00278.x/full Kindly confirm the correctness of your suggested reference. Thank you
  • Anup Kumar Bandyopadhyay added an answer:
    What are the major reasons limiting school teachers in using technology in their classrooms?
    Technology usage by teachers
    Anup Bandyopadhyay · Jadavpur University
    I feel, the attitude of the “e-proponents” is that at any cost e-products must replace the traditional system irrespective of any benefit achieved from this change. Some times cost benefit consideration and learning efficiency are proposed as an argument in favor of such replacement. But is there any comprehensive data for such claim? Do we have enough material to decide the level at which e-learning system is necessary. I use the word “necessary” because I feel necessity should decide replacement of an old system. It should not be introduced just because the e-intellectuals believe that it is good.

Topic Followers (19179) See all