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Publications (6)5.93 Total impact

  • B Sposato, M Scalese, G Moschini, M G Migliorini
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    ABSTRACT: Asthma can have clinical seasonal fluctuations due to different exposure factors. The analysis of our data and literature confirm a seasonal trend of asthma severity. In this brief review, authors discuss the possibility to adapt maintenance therapy level to clinical seasonal fluctuations, by increasing treatment in some seasons to prevent exacerbations and by decreasing it in others, when symptoms are low, in order to minimize costs and maximize safety. Literature and our data (concerning studies carried out in areas with a temperate climate) indicate that asthma severity is reduced in summer while it tends to increase in the other seasons. Authors conclude that a preventive increasing maintenance treatment level during the season when we know that patients worsen (starting some weeks before symptom worsening) may reduce asthma exacerbation risks. On the contrary, a summer treatment reduction, in patients that improve during this period, may be considered only in asthma phenotypes with a benign disease course in time.
    03/2015; 19(6):942-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Our study tried to find a relationship between baseline FEF25-75% and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and whether a greater FEF25-75% impairment may be a marker of a more severe hyperresponsiveness in subjects with normal FEV1 and FEV1/FVC and suggestive asthma symptoms. Besides, we tried to asses a FEF25-75% cut-off value to identify hyper-reactive subjects. Methods 4,172 subjects (2,042 M; mean age: 38.3±14.9; mean FEV1 % predicted: 100.5±12.7 and FEV1/FVC: 85.4±6.8) were examined after performing a methacholine (Mch) test. All subjects reported a symptom onset within 3 years before the test. Subjects with PD20<400 or >400 µg were arbitrarily considered affected by moderate/severe and borderline AHR, respectively. Results PD20 values were 213 (IQR:86-557), 340 (IQR:157-872) and 433 (IQR:196-1032) µg in subjects with baseline FEF25-75≤50%, FEF25-75 between 50 and 70% and FEF25-75>70% respectively (P<0.0001). Only in moderate/severe hyper-reactive subjects (excluded borderlines), PD20 was lower in the FEF25-75≤50% subgroup than in the 1 with FEF25-75>70%. The hyperreactive subjects percentage, was higher in those with FEF25-75≤50% and lower in those with FEF25-75>70% (P<0.0001). FEF25-75<50% (compared to FEF25-75>70%) was a higher AHR risk factor, especially in subjects with moderate/severe AHR (OR: 2.18 [IQR:1.41-3.37]; P<0.0001). Thresholds yielding the highest combined sensitivity/specificity for FEF25-75% were 75.19 (area under curve [AUC]: 0.653) and 74.95 (AUC:0.688) in subjects with PD20<2,400 and <400 µg respectively. FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC measured in subjects with different FEF25-75≤50%, FEF25-75>50 and ≤70% or FEF25-75>70% levels were similar both in normoreactive and hyperreactive subjects. Conclusions At asthma onset, reduced baseline FEF25-75 values with normal FEV1 and FEV1/FVC may predict AHR. Detectable predictive cut-off values do not exist because even normoreactive subjects can show lower FEF25-75 values. Furthermore, a greater FEF25-75 reduction may be associated to a more severe AHR, suggesting a possible FEF25-75 role in the management of asthma when FEV1 and FEV1/FVC are normal.
    Allergy, asthma & immunology research 05/2014; 6(3):242-51. DOI:10.4168/aair.2014.6.3.242 · 3.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Literature is still arguing about a possible relationship between airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and body mass index (BMI). This study aimed at evaluating the influence of BMI on AHR and pulmonary function in children and adolescents that performed a methacholine test for suggestive asthma symptoms. 799 consecutive children/adolescents (535 M; mean age: 15 +/- 3 yrs; median FEV1% predicted: 101.94% [93.46-111.95] and FEV1/FVC predicted: 91.07 [86.17-95.38]), were considered and divided into underweight, normal, overweight and obese. Different AHR levels were considered as moderate/severe (PD20 <= 400mug) and borderline (PD20 > 400mug). 536 children/adolescents resulted hyperreactive with a median PD20 of 366mug [IQR:168--1010.5]; 317 patients were affected by moderate/severe AHR, whereas 219 showed borderline hyperresponsiveness. Obese subjects aged > 13 years showed a lower (p = 0.026) median PD20 (187mug [IQR:110--519]) compared to overweight (377mug [IQR:204--774]) and normal-weight individuals' values (370.5mug [IQR:189--877]). On the contrary, median PD20 observed in obese children aged <= 13 years (761mug [IQR:731--1212]) was higher (p = 0.052) compared to normal-weight children's PD20 (193mug [IQR:81--542]) and to obese adolescents' values (aged > 13 years) (p = 0.019). Obesity was a significant AHR risk factor (OR:2.853[1.037-7.855]; p = 0.042) in moderate/severe AHR adolescents. Females showed a higher AHR risk (OR:1.696[1.046-2.751] p = 0.032) compared to males. A significant relationship was found between BMI and functional parameters (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC) only in hyperreactive females. Obesity seems to influence AHR negatively in female but not in male adolescents and children. In fact, AHR is higher in obese teenagers, in particular in those with moderate/severe hyperresponsiveness, and may be mediated by obesity-associated changes in baseline lung function.
    Multidisciplinary respiratory medicine 09/2013; 8(1):60. DOI:10.1186/2049-6958-8-60 · 0.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data indicate that obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but scientific literature is still debating the association between changes in body mass index (BMI) and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). METHODS: This study aimed at evaluating the influence of BMI on AHR, in outpatients with symptoms suggestive of asthma.4,217 consecutive adult subjects (2,439 M; mean age: 38.2+/-14.9 yrs; median FEV1 % predicted: 100 [IQR:91.88-107.97] and FEV1/FVC % predicted: 85.77 % [IQR:81.1-90.05]), performed a methacholine challenge test for suspected asthma. Subjects with PD20 < 200 or 200 < PD20 < 800 or PD20 > 800 were considered affected by severe, moderate or mild AHR, respectively.. RESULTS: A total of 2,520 subjects (60 % of all cases) had a PD20 < 3,200 mug, with a median PD20 of 366 mug [IQR:168--1010.5]; 759, 997 and 764 patients were affected by mild, moderate and severe AHR, respectively. BMI was not associated with increasing AHR in males. On the contrary, obese females were at risk for AHR only when those with moderate AHR were considered (OR: 1.772 [1.250-2.512], p = 0.001). A significant reduction of FEV1/FVC for unit of BMI increase was found in moderate AHR, both in males (beta = -0.255; p =0.023) and in females (beta = -0.451; p =0.017). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that obesity influences AHR only in females with a moderate AHR level. This influence may be mediated by obesity-associated changes in baseline lung function.
    11/2012; 7(1):45. DOI:10.1186/2049-6958-7-45
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    ABSTRACT: The pandemic influenza A H1N1 will affect millions of subjects. This influenza can cause respiratory complications with possible death. We have described two case reports of acute severe asthma exacerbation combined to influenza A H1N1, caracterized by severe respiratory failure. The diagnosis of influenza A H1N1 was confirmed with the multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. These patients, apart from asthma, do not have other diseases; but they did not take adequate therapy. In addition to conventional therapy (corticosteroids, bronchodilator and antibiotics) oseltamivir 75 mg bid was immediately added. After few days the patients improved and therefore in a short time they were discharged. During this period, in the case of severe asthma exacerbations, one must always think of influenza A H1N1 as the possible cause. It is necessary to use oseltamivir precociously to avoid severe complications. All asthmatic patients must regularly take their therapy especially during pandemic influenza A H1N1.
    European review for medical and pharmacological sciences 05/2010; 14(5):487-90. · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mesalazine therapy for ulcerative colitis has been reported to be effective and safe. Rare cases of mesalazine-induced renal, pancreatic, myo-pericardial, pleuro-pulmonary and haematological toxicity have been described separately. We report a case characterized by the simultaneous presence of fever, pericarditis, peripheral eosinophilia, eosinophilic pneumonia, anaemia and haematuria (together with proteinuria and leukocyturia) due to mesalazine treatment in a patient with ulcerative colitis. No clinical response had been obtained with corticosteroids and various antibacterial agents. When mesalazine treatment was suspended, all symptoms rapidly and totally disappeared, confirming the direct responsibility of this drug in causing these adverse events. We conclude that mesalazine can induce multi-organ hypersensitivity, which must always be considered as a possible adverse effect during treatment with this drug. To resolve this adverse event it is essential to discontinue mesalazine treatment.
    Clinical Drug Investigation 01/2010; 30(6):413-7. DOI:10.2165/11535480-000000000-00000 · 1.70 Impact Factor