Sotiria Sotiriou

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States

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Publications (4)53.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In Parkinson disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in humans, increased alpha-synuclein (SNCA) levels are pathogenic, as evidenced by gene copy number mutations and increased alpha-synuclein levels detected in some familial and sporadic PD cases, respectively. Gene expression can be regulated at the post-transcriptional level by elements in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of mRNAs. The goal of this study was to determine whether the 3'UTR of human SNCA can affect gene expression. Comparative sequence analysis revealed very high conservation across the entire 3'UTR of human SNCA over millions of years, suggesting the presence of multiple functionally important domains. EST and RT-PCR analyses showed that four different polyadenylation events occur in the 3'UTR of human SNCA. Finally, using luciferase assays, we examined the effect of the minor allele of five naturally occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 3'UTR of SNCA on gene expression. The minor allele of SNP rs17016074 increased luciferase expression by 32% in a transient transfection assay in SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Understanding the role of the 3'UTR of human SNCA and identifying functionally important naturally occurring SNPs using reporter assays can complement disease association studies in humans, uncovering potential susceptibility or protective polymorphisms in Parkinson disease. Our findings demonstrate that the 3'UTR of human SNCA, as a whole, and rs17016074, in particular, are loci of potential clinical importance for Parkinson disease.
    Neuroscience Letters 07/2009; 461(2):196-201. · 2.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is a cofactor required in catecholamine synthesis for conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine by dopamine beta-hydroxylase. Mutant mice lacking the plasma membrane ascorbic acid transporter (SVCT2) have severely reduced tissue levels of ascorbic acid and die after birth. We therefore investigated whether these mice might have impaired synthesis of catecholamines. Levels of catecholamines in brain were unaffected by SVCT2 deficiency. In heart, the only evidence for impaired dopamine beta-hydroxylase activity was a twofold increase in tissue dopamine. An influence of the deficiency on tissue catecholamines was most prominent in the adrenals where norepinephrine was decreased by 50% and epinephrine, by 81%. On the ultrastructural level, adrenal chromaffin cells in SVCT2 null mice showed depletion of catecholamine storage vesicles, increased amounts of rough endoplasmic reticulum, signs of apoptosis, and increased glycogen storage. Decreased plasma levels of corticosterone indicated additional effects of the deficiency on adrenal cortical function. These data show that deranged catecholamine system function in SVCT2 null mice is largely restricted to the adrenal medulla and cannot account for the lethality in these animals. The data, however, establish a crucial role for ascorbic acid in adrenal chromaffin cell function.
    The FASEB Journal 11/2003; 17(13):1928-30. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The only proven requirement for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is in preventing scurvy, presumably because it is a cofactor for hydroxylases required for post-translational modifications that stabilize collagen. We have created mice deficient in the mouse ortholog (solute carrier family 23 member 1 or Slc23a1) of a rat ascorbic-acid transporter, Svct2 (ref. 4). Cultured embryonic fibroblasts from homozygous Slc23a1(-/-) mice had less than 5% of normal ascorbic-acid uptake. Ascorbic-acid levels were undetectable or markedly reduced in the blood and tissues of Slc23a1(-/-) mice. Prenatal supplementation of pregnant females did not elevate blood ascorbic acid in Slc23a1(-/-) fetuses, suggesting Slc23a1 is important in placental ascorbic-acid transport. Slc23a1(-/-) mice died within a few minutes of birth with respiratory failure and intraparenchymal brain hemorrhage. Lungs showed no postnatal expansion but had normal surfactant protein B levels. Brain hemorrhage was unlikely to be simply a form of scurvy since Slc23a1(-/-) mice showed no hemorrhage in any other tissues and their skin had normal skin 4-hydroxyproline levels despite low ascorbic-acid content. We conclude that Slc23a1 is required for transport of ascorbic acid into many tissues and across the placenta. Deficiency of the transporter is lethal in newborn mice, thereby revealing a previously unrecognized requirement for ascorbic acid in the perinatal period.
    Nature Medicine 06/2002; 8(5):514-7. · 22.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The only proven requirement for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is in preventing scurvy1, 2, presumably because it is a cofactor for hydroxylases required for post-translational modifications that stabilize collagen3. We have created mice deficient in the mouse ortholog (solute carrier family 23 member 1 or Slc23a1) of a rat ascorbic-acid transporter, Svct2 (ref. 4). Cultured embryonic fibroblasts from homozygous Slc23a1 -/- mice had less than 5% of normal ascorbic-acid uptake. Ascorbic-acid levels were undetectable or markedly reduced in the blood and tissues of Slc23a1 -/- mice. Prenatal supplementation of pregnant females did not elevate blood ascorbic acid in Slc23a1 -/- fetuses, suggesting Slc23a1 is important in placental ascorbic-acid transport. Slc23a1 -/- mice died within a few minutes of birth with respiratory failure and intraparenchymal brain hemorrhage. Lungs showed no postnatal expansion but had normal surfactant protein B levels. Brain hemorrhage was unlikely to be simply a form of scurvy since Slc23a1 -/- mice showed no hemorrhage in any other tissues and their skin had normal skin 4-hydroxyproline levels despite low ascorbic-acid content. We conclude that Slc23a1 is required for transport of ascorbic acid into many tissues and across the placenta. Deficiency of the transporter is lethal in newborn mice, thereby revealing a previously unrecognized requirement for ascorbic acid in the perinatal period.
    Nature Medicine 04/2002; 8(5):514-517. · 22.86 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

213 Citations
53.46 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Division of Hospital Medicine
      San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 2002
    • National Human Genome Research Institute
      Maryland, United States