J P Zidar

Beth Israel Medical Center, New York City, New York, United States

Are you J P Zidar?

Claim your profile

Publications (50)228.85 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper provides a comprehensive up-to-date review of the medical and invasive management of patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), as supported by recent updates to the ACC/AHA Guidelines. The authors have summarized findings from key clinical trials published in recent years that contribute to clinician's understanding of how best to optimize therapy. The goals for the management of NSTE-ACS and STEMI are rapid and accurate risk stratification, appropriate and institution-specific triage to interventional versus medical strategies and optimal pharmacologic therapy - all of which provide for a smooth and seamless transition of care between the emergency department and the cardiology service. High-risk features or absolute treatment trigger criteria that support more aggressive medical therapy (i.e., addition of a small molecule gylcoprotein [GP] IIb/IIIa inhibitor to a core regimen of aspirin, enoxaparin or other anticoagulants, and in most cases, clopidogrel) and/or that would direct clinicians toward percutaneous interventional strategies as the preferred modality include, but are not limited to the presence of one or more of the following: 1) elevatedcardiac markers (troponin and/or CK-MB); 2) age older than 65 years; 3) presence of ST-T-wave changes; 4) TIMI Risk Score >/= 5; 5) clinical instability in the setting of suspected NSTE-ACS. Although additional refinements and changes in ACS management are still to come, evidence-based strategies suggest that prompt mechanical revascularization is associated with the best possible clinical outcomes, particularly for patients with high-risk features and in whom benefits of adjunctive, pharmacoinvasive antithrombotic therapies can be consolidated. Transfer for cardiac catheterization/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is strongly recommended in patients who manifest high-risk features and/or aggressive treatment trigger criteria, so that this high-risk subgroup may receive definitive, interventional and/or cardiology-directed specialty care at appropriate sites of care. When available, interventional management is preferred in these patients. The importance of safe and effective anticoagulation in the spectrum of management strategies has been confirmed, and the evidence in support of enoxaparin and other antithrombotic agents has been reviewed. Dosing recommendations for enoxaparin use in the setting of PCI have been issued by the CATH Panel and have been summarized in this consensus report. Similar recommendations have been presented for the use of oral antiplatelet agents and GP IIb/IIIa antagonists. The addition of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta-blockers is also stressed as part of a comprehensive secondary cardioprotective strategy for patients with coronary heart disease.
    The Journal of invasive cardiology 12/2007; 19(12):525-38; quiz 539-40. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper provides a comprehensive up-to-date review of the medical and invasive management of patients with non- ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS). The authors have summarized findings from key clinical trials published recent years that contribute to clinicians' understanding of how best to optimize therapy. The goals for the management of NSTE-ACS are rapid and accurate risk stratification, appropriate and institution-specific triage to interventional versus medical strategies and optimal pharmacologic therapy--all of which provide for a smooth and seamless transition of care between the emergency department and the cardiology service. High-risk features or absolute treatment trigger criteria that support more aggressive medical therapy (i.e., addition of small-molecule GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor to a core regimen of aspirin, enoxaparin, and in most cases, clopidogrel) and/or that would direct clinicians toward percutaneous, mechanical/interventional strategies as the preferred modality include, but are not limited to, the presence of one or more of the following: (1) elevated cardiac markers (troponin and/or CK-MB); (2) elevated levels of inflammatory markers (particularly CRP > 3 microg/dl); (3) age > 65 years; (4) presence of ST-T wave changes; (5) TIMI Risk Score greater than or equal to 4; (6) diabetes; and/or (7) clinical instability in the setting of suspected NSTE-ACS. Specific clinical, ECG and/or biochemical trigger points modulate the aggressiveness of both the medical therapy and the propensity to perform early angiography with or without subsequent revascularization in patients with NSTE-ACS. Although additional refinements and changes in ACS management are still to come, evidence-based strategies suggest that prompt mechanical revascularization is associated with the best possible clinical outcomes, particularly for patients with high-risk features and in whom benefits of adjunctive, pharmacoinvasive antithrombotic therapies can be consolidated. Patient transfer for cardiac catheterization/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is strongly recommended in patients who manifest high-risk features and/or aggressive treatment trigger criteria, so that this high-risk subgroup may receive definitive, interventional and/or cardiology-directed specialty care at appropriate sites of care. When available, interventional management is preferred in these patients. The importance of safe and effective anticoagulation in the spectrum of management strategies has been confirmed, and the evidence in support of enoxaparin and other antithrombotic agents has been reviewed. Dosing recommendations for enoxaparin use in the setting of PCI have been issued by the CATH Panel and have been summarized in this consensus report. Similar recommendations have been presented for the use of oral antiplatelet agents and GP IIb/IIIa antagonists. The addition of statins, ACE-inhibitors and beta-blockers is also stressed as part of a comprehensive secondary cardioprotective strategy for patients with coronary heart disease.
    The Journal of invasive cardiology 01/2007; 18(12):617-39. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We examined outcomes of clinical restenosis and temporal trends in repeat target vessel revascularization (TVR) among a broad, unselected patient population undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization. The extent to which clinical trials involving protocol-specified follow-up angiography reflect real-world practice where interventions are driven by clinical restenosis is not completely understood. Whether clinical outcomes have varied over a long-term period that has paralleled substantial advances in stent design, balloon delivery catheter and adjunctive pharmacologic therapies is uncertain. To characterize the effectiveness of coronary stenting in routine practice, we examined 1-year clinical outcomes of death and repeat TVR among 5,765 patients enrolled in the Duke Database for Cardiovascular Disease who underwent stent placement between 1994 and 2002. To assess for temporal trends in outcomes, patients were further divided into tertiles according to the year of initial revascularization. Overall, the 1-year occurrence of TVR and death was 11.4% and 4.9%, respectively. Rates of repeat TVR increased at 3-month intervals, with most events occurring prior to 9 months. In an adjusted analysis over an 8-year period, 1-year survival did not significantly differ across patient tertiles (p = 0.95), although rates of recurrent TVR significantly decreased (1994-1996, 11.1%; 1997-1999, 11.5%; 2000-2002, 9.3%; p = 0.003). In a broad patient population in whom repeat angiography is not protocol-specified, most events occur within the initial months following revascularization, yet late clinical restenosis continues. Although survival has not improved since the introduction of coronary stents, overall rates of repeat revascularization have modestly, but significantly, declined.
    The Journal of invasive cardiology 10/2006; 18(9):398-402. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Coronary stents have markedly improved the short- and intermediate-term safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention by improving acute gains in luminal dimensions, decreasing abrupt vessel occlusion, and decreasing restenosis, yet the long-term benefit of coronary stenting remains uncertain. We examined long-term clinical outcomes of death, myocardial infarction, and repeat target vessel revascularization (TVR) among patients enrolled in the Duke Database for Cardiovascular Disease who underwent revascularization with percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty alone or stent placement from 1990 to 2002. Among 6,956 patients who underwent percutaneous revascularization, propensity modeling was applied to identify 1,288 matched patients with a similar likelihood to receive coronary stents according to clinical, angiographic, and demographic characteristics. Significant (p <0.05) predictors of stent placement included multivessel disease, diabetes, hypertension, recent myocardial infarction, decreased ejection fraction, and year of study entry. At a median follow-up of 7 years, although treatment with coronary stenting was associated with a significant and sustained decrease in repeat TVR (18.0% vs 28.1%, p = 0.0002) and the occurrence of death, myocardial infarction or TVR (39.2% vs 45.8%, p = 0.004), long-term survival did not significantly differ between treatment groups (19.9% vs 20.5%, p = 0.72). Outcomes of death and myocardial infarction did not significantly differ between patients who did and did not undergo repeat TVR. In conclusion, compared with angioplasty alone, revascularization with coronary stents provides a significant early and sustained decrease in the need for repeat revascularization, but stents do not influence long-term survival.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 05/2006; 97(10):1467-72. · 3.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Even in the absence of symptoms, peripheral arterial disease carries with it a significant risk of morbidity and mortality; thus, screening with the use of the ankle-brachial index is important in identifying patients at risk. Endovascular therapy in the lower extremities is continually evolving for treatment of patients with claudication symptoms or limb-threatening ischemia. Alternative treatments such as cryotherapy and the use of laser-assisted angioplasty hold much promise but need further investigation. In the case of renal artery stenosis and resulting hypertension, supportive clinical evidence is limited for renal revascularization despite the rationale for reducing cardiovascular risk. The current standard of care for significant carotid artery stenosis can include carotid stenting and carotid endarterectomy, but medical therapy may have a role also.
    Reviews in cardiovascular medicine 02/2006; 7(2):55-68. · 0.58 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs) have been shown to dramatically reduce the risk of angiographic and clinical restenosis compared with bare metal stent (BMS) implantation. However, the overall cost-effectiveness of this strategy is unknown. Between February and August 2001, 1058 patients with complex coronary stenoses were enrolled in the SIRIUS trial and randomized to percutaneous coronary revascularization with either a SES or BMS. Clinical outcomes, resource use, and costs were assessed prospectively for all patients over a 1-year follow-up period. Initial hospital costs were increased by 2881 dollars per patient with SESs. Over the 1-year follow-up period, use of SESs led to substantial reductions in the need for repeat revascularization, including repeat percutaneous coronary intervention and bypass surgery. Although follow-up costs were reduced by 2571 dollars per patient with SESs, aggregate 1-year costs remained 309 dollars per patient higher. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SES was 1650 dollars per repeat revascularization event avoided or 27,540 dollars per quality-adjusted year of life gained, values that compare reasonably with other accepted medical interventions. Under updated treatment assumptions regarding available stent lengths and duration of antiplatelet therapy, use of SESs was projected to reduce total 1-year costs compared with BMSs. Although use of SESs was not cost-saving compared with BMS implantation, for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention of complex coronary stenoses, their use appears to be reasonably cost-effective within the context of the US healthcare system.
    Circulation 09/2004; 110(5):508-14. · 15.20 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of invasive cardiology 09/2004; 16(8):436-8. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Drug-eluting intracoronary stents decrease restenosis and later revascularization. The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), recognizing the financial and clinical impact of this technology, recently proposed accelerated reimbursement to hospitals. A disease state-transition computer model simulated the clinical and economic consequences to hospitals of drug-eluting stents over 5 years. Model parameters combined information from a longitudinal clinical database, a hospital cost-accounting system, and a survey instrument. Simulations were repeated 1000 times for each set of parameters. With 85% of stent procedures shifted to drug-eluting stents in the first year of availability, the mean number of repeat revascularizations dropped by 60.4% at year 5. With no changes in reimbursement policy, a hospital with a catheterization laboratory volume of 3112 patients yearly converted from a 2.01 million dollars (M) annual profit to an 8.10 M dollars loss in the first year (95% CI 8.09 M dollars to 8.12 M dollars) and 8.7 M dollars annual losses in later years. This represented an overall change in cash flow of 55.71 M dollars (95% CI 55.66 M dollars to 55.76 M dollars) away from the hospital over 5 years. The incremental reimbursement proposed by HHS reduced this loss to 4.75 M dollars in the first year and to 5.6 M dollars annually thereafter. In sensitivity analyses, the conversion of patients from bypass surgery to drug-eluting stents was the largest driver of overall cash flow shifts. Although Medicare has proposed to increase reimbursement to ease the impact of drug-eluting stents on hospitals, this increase will not totally offset the costs.
    American heart journal 04/2004; 147(3):449-56. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of invasive cardiology 10/2003; 15(9):536-53. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite recent advances in catheter-based technologies for peripheral arterial revascularization, adequate guide catheter positioning and support remains a leading procedural challenge. This report describes the adaptation of the Behar Internal Mammary VB-1 catheter for peripheral revascularization procedures in patients with complex anatomy not amendable to other conventional peripheral guide catheters.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 09/2003; 59(4):514-7. · 2.51 Impact Factor
  • Source
    James P Zidar
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 08/2003; 42(2):381-3. · 14.09 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The relative anti-aggregatory effects of currently prescribed platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists during and after percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes have not been established. We randomized 70 acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to receive abciximab, eptifibatide, or tirofiban at doses used in the Evaluation of Platelet IIb/IIIa Inhibitor for STENTing (EPISTENT), Platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in Unstable angina Receptor Suppression Using Integrilin Therapy (PURSUIT), and Platelet Receptor Inhibition in ischemic Syndrome Management in Patients Limited by Unstable Signs and symptoms (PRISM-PLUS)/Randomized Efficacy Study of Tirofiban for Outcomes and Restenosis (RESTORE) trials, respectively. Platelet aggregation (PA) in response to 20 micro mol/L of adenosine diphosphate was measured with turbidimetric aggregometry in both D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine chloromethylketone and citrate-anticoagulated blood early (15 and 30 minutes) and late (4, 12, and 18 to 24 hours) after drug initiation. At 15 and 30 minutes, PA was significantly less inhibited by the tirofiban-RESTORE regimen compared with abciximab (P=0.028) and eptifibatide regimens (P=0.0001). The abciximab regimen, however, showed increasingly varied anti-aggregatory effects during continued infusion for > or =4 hours. Citrate exaggerated ex vivo platelet inhibition after eptifibatide and tirofiban, but had the opposite effect on abciximab. Of all regimens evaluated, the eptifibatide regimen inhibited PA most consistently throughout both the early and late periods. Currently recommended drug regimens to inhibit the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor have distinct pharmacodynamic profiles that might affect their relative efficacy in acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary intervention.
    Circulation 10/2002; 106(12):1470-6. · 15.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Women have higher mortality rates than men after coronary angioplasty. Differences in target vessel size may partially account for these differences. We set out to explore the effects of sex, body surface area (BSA), and target coronary vessel size on clinical outcomes after angioplasty. Data from 5 interventional trials and 1 registry were pooled for analysis (n = 3982). Compared with men, women undergoing angioplasty were older, had lower weights and BSA, more coronary risk factors, and slightly smaller target coronary vessel size (as assessed by reference vessel diameter). The correlation between target vessel size and BSA was poor (r = 0.13). At 6 months, women had higher mortality rates (1.7% vs 0.8%, P =.03) but similar rates of myocardial infarction and repeat revascularization. On univariate analysis, advanced age, smaller BSA, and female sex were associated with increased mortality, but target vessel size was not. Advanced age was the only significant multivariate predictor of mortality. Target vessel size and diabetes were independent predictors of repeat revascularization. Women have higher unadjusted 6-month mortality rates after angioplasty, owing largely to their more advanced age at the time of intervention. Smaller target vessel size is associated with increased risk of restenosis and repeat revascularization; however, it does not appear to be a predictor for downstream mortality. As such, the fact that women have smaller vessels does not account for their higher 6-month mortality after coronary angioplasty.
    American heart journal 09/2002; 144(2):297-302. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intracoronary stents have markedly improved the short- and long-term safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention by improving acute gains in luminal dimensions, decreasing abrupt vessel occlusion, and reducing restenosis. At present, nearly 90% of all coronary interventions involve stenting. A variety of advances in stent technology and design have expanded the clinical application of stenting to include complex coronary lesions, multivessel disease, and small-diameter vessels. In addition, the development of stents as drug delivery systems for antithrombotic or antiproliferative agents has the potential to expand the role of coronary stenting, and early clinical experience appears promising. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in stent design, examine the results of clinical trials of contemporary stents, and present future directions for investigation of new stent technologies.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 09/2002; 56(4):562-76. · 2.51 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Controversy exists regarding the frequency of late stent thrombosis among patients treated with intracoronary stents and the most appropriate duration of treatment with a thienopyridine that is required to prevent this complication. We analyzed the frequency of stent thrombosis and other ischemic events in the Antiplatelet Therapy alone versus Lovenox plus Antiplatelet therapy in patients at increased risk of Stent Thrombosis (ATLAST) trial. In the ATLAST trial, 1102 patients at increased risk of stent thrombosis (ST-elevation myocardial infarction within 48 hours, diffuse distal disease, a large amount of thrombus, acute closure, residual dissection, etc) were randomly assigned to receive either enoxaparin (40 or 60 mg given every 12 hours for 14 days) or placebo; all patients received aspirin (325 mg daily) and ticlopidine (250 mg twice daily) for only 14 days. The primary end point, the 30-day combined incidence of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and urgent revascularization, was reached in 2.3% of patients (1.8% of patients taking enoxaparin vs 2.7% of patients taking placebo; P =.295). However, during the 15th through 30th days, the frequency of ischemic events was only 0.73%, and only 0.27% (3/1102) of patients had possible stent thrombosis (95% CI 0.06, 0.77). The frequency of stent thrombosis and other adverse ischemic events in the 15th through 30th days after stent placement in even high-risk stent patients treated with ticlopidine for only 2 weeks is low whether or not enoxaparin is administered.
    American heart journal 06/2002; 143(5):841-6. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken as a pilot investigation to compare multidetector CT angiography with conventional catheter angiography for the visualization of the renal artery lumen after renal artery stent placement. CT angiography was performed within 24-48 hr of renal artery stent placement in 15 patients. Two patients had bilateral stents, resulting in a total of 17 stents. CT angiography was performed using a multidetector scanner and a bolus of IV contrast material with the scanning delay determined by a small-volume timing bolus. A volumetric data set was acquired through the stented arteries in the axial plane using a 4.0 x 1.25 mm detector configuration and a pitch of 3:1. The stent lumen diameter, as measured on direct CT angiography and curved multiplanar reformations in both the axial and coronal planes, was compared with that measured on catheter angiography. The lumina of all 17 stents were well visualized and patent on both CT angiography and catheter angiography. Anatomic definition, including stent position and wall apposition in the renal artery, correlated well with catheter angiography. The diameter of the renal artery stent lumen measured on catheter angiography (mean, 5.9 +/- 1.3 mm) was greater than that on CT angiography (mean stent lumen diameter for direct axial plane was 4.6 +/- 1.0 mm, for curved multiplanar reformations in the axial plane was 4.3 +/- 1.0 mm, and for curved multiplanar reformations in the coronal plane was 4.4 +/- 1.0 mm) in 14 (82%) of 17 stents. CT angiography produced interpretable multiplanar images of the renal artery, even with a metallic stent in place, and was adequate for determining stent patency. Compared with catheter angiography, the intrastent luminal diameter was underestimated in most patients who underwent CT angiography.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 06/2002; 178(5):1155-9. · 2.90 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We performed a multicenter, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to examine the efficacy and safety of enoxaparin in patients at high risk for stent thrombosis (ST). The optimal antithrombotic regimen for such patients is unknown. We randomized 1,102 patients with clinical, angiographic or ultrasonographic features associated with an increased risk of ST to receive either twice-daily injections of weight-adjusted enoxaparin or placebo for 14 days after stenting. All patients received aspirin and ticlopidine. The primary end point was a 30-day composite end point of death, myocardial infarction (MI) or urgent revascularization. The target enrollment for the study was 2,000 patients. However, the trial was terminated prematurely at 1,102 patients after interim analysis revealed an unexpectedly low event rate. The primary outcome occurred in 1.8% enoxaparin-treated patients versus 2.7% treated with placebo (odds ratio [OR] 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29 to 1.5, p = 0.30); for death or MI the rates were 0.9% vs. 2.2%, respectively (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.14 to 1.2, p =0.13); and for MI, 0.4% vs. 1.6%, respectively (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.99, p = 0.04). The groups had comparable rates of major bleeding (3.3% for enoxaparin, 1.6% for placebo, p =0.08), but minor nuisance bleeding was increased with enoxaparin (25% vs. 5.1%, p < 0.001). The clinical outcomes of patients at increased risk of ST are more favorable than previously reported, rendering routine oral antiplatelet therapy adequate for most. However, given its relative safety and potential to reduce the risk of subsequent infarction, a 14-day course of enoxaparin may be considered for carefully selected patients.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 12/2001; 38(6):1608-13. · 14.09 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of invasive cardiology 09/2001; 13(8):597-9, discussion 599-600. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To predict which patients might not require stent implantation, we identified clinical and angiographic characteristics associated with repeat revascularization after standard balloon angioplasty. Stents reduce the risk of repeat revascularization but are costly and may lead to in-stent restenosis, which remains difficult to treat. Identification of patients at low risk for repeat revascularization may allow clinicians to reserve stents for patients most likely to benefit. Data from five interventional trials (5,146 patients) were pooled for analysis. We identified patients with optimal angiographic results (final diameter stenosis < or =30% and no dissection) after balloon angioplasty and determined the multivariable predictors of repeat revascularization. Optimal angiographic results were achieved in 18% of patients after angioplasty. The repeat revascularization rate at six months was lower for patients with optimal results (20% vs. 26%, p < 0.001) but still higher than observed in stent trials. Independent predictors of repeat revascularization were female gender (odds ratio [OR] 1.67, p = 0.01), lesion length > or =10 mm (OR 1.62, p = 0.03) and proximal left anterior descending coronary artery lesions (OR 1.62, p = 0.03). For the 8% of patients with optimal angiographic results and none of these risk factors, the repeat revascularization and target vessel revascularization rates were 14% and 8% respectively, similar to rates after stent implantation. Cost analysis estimated that $78 million per year might be saved in the U.S. with a provisional stenting strategy using these criteria compared with elective stenting. A combination of baseline characteristics and angiographic results can be used to identify a small group of patients at very low risk for repeat revascularization after balloon angioplasty. Provisional stenting for these low risk patients could substantially reduce costs without compromising clinical outcomes.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 06/2001; 37(7):1883-90. · 14.09 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A 33-year-old woman with subacute thrombosis of the distal aorta after aorto-bi-iliac stenting had local thrombolysis with reteplase in conjunction with systemic abciximab. The infusion was given as a bolus and then continuously for 14 hr by radial artery access with two selective kissing catheters. Patency of the stented segments was achieved with this technique in conjunction with resolution of her clinical symptoms. Cathet Cardiovasc Intervent 2001;53:264–268. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 05/2001; 53(2):264 - 268. · 2.51 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

761 Citations
228.85 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007
    • Beth Israel Medical Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1992–2006
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • • Division of Cardiology
      • • Duke Clinical Research Institute
      • • Department of Medicine
      Durham, NC, United States
  • 2003
    • The Ohio State University
      • Center for Real Estate Education and Research
      Columbus, OH, United States
  • 2002
    • Mayo Clinic - Rochester
      Rochester, Minnesota, United States
    • Duke Raleigh Hospital
      Raleigh, North Carolina, United States
  • 2000–2001
    • St. Michael's Hospital
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • North Carolina Clinical Research
      Raleigh, North Carolina, United States
    • Montreal Heart Institute
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada